Culture

Arts and culture

In this segment from last week's episode of the Big Something, Noel Black brings you a profile of beloved Manitou artist Charles Rockey. He just released a book of fables and illuminations--Love Songs of Middle Time--that he’s been working on for the past 15 years. You can buy copies of the book at the Manitou Art Center, the Manitou Heritage Center, and Miramont Castle in Manitou.

During the Cold War, the Army began making land acquisitions to develop a training site where mountain post soldiers could prepare for war in an environment similar to potential areas for deployment. The result was the establishment of the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site, an over 200,000 acre training area in Southeastern Colorado. More than 20 years later, in 2006, the Army sought to expand the site. Instead, they met a local organized resistance, and were unable to extend their training ground.  

Wolf Creek Pass is a multi-lane highway, winding through the San Juan Mountains between South Fork and Pagosa Springs. The high mountain pass is renowned for its grand views of the San Juan valley, river, and waterfalls, along with its National Forest access. In the last couple of years, however, the most noticeable part of Wolf Creek Pass is that much of the once thriving green spruce forest has now died off and turned red. In this segment from last week's episode of The Big Something, Emelie Frojen investigates.

 Last month, KRCC welcomed StoryCorps and their mobile booth back to Colorado Springs.  StoryCorps, a non-profit organization, dedicates itself to recording and preserving the oral histories of people from all backgrounds. They store these records at the American Folklife Center at The Library of Congress. In the following interview, Colorado Springs' first female mayor, Mary Lou Makepeace, and current Colorado Springs Councilwoman Jan Martin sit down together to discuss what it means to be a woman in politics.

On this episode of The Big Something Radio Programme, news director Andrea Chalfin speaks with the authors of a paper about the conflict between the military and ranchers in Piñon Canyon; Big Something intern Emelie Frojen looks into the beetle kill on Wolf Creek Pass; Former Colorado Springs Mayor Mary Lou Makepeace and former City Councilwoman Jan Martin look back on their careers in politics; And a portrait of Manitou artist Charles Rockey as he releases a book of fables and illuminations 15 years in the making.

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The late Myron Wood was one of the most prolific  photographers of the Pikes Peak Region and Southwest during the 20th Century. Though he himself never achieved the degree of fame that his talents might merit, students of his such as Robert Adams gained renown in the New Landscape movement.

Journalist and novelist Peter Heller has led a life of adventure, covering extraordinary stories in remote parts of the world for such magazines as Outside, Men’s Journal, and National Geographic Adventure. He’s the author of several critically acclaimed books of nonfiction, and more recently, he’s made a foray into fiction-writing with his bestselling novel The Dog Stars and his new book, The Painter. He’ll be in Colorado Springs to speak at Colorado College on Wednesday as part of the Journalist-In-Residence speaker series.

On this month’s episode of The Big Something we talk to a Greg Lutze, a Manitou Springs native who co-founded a digital photography company that aspires to be the Kodak of the 21st century; Legendary poet and environmental activist Gary Snyder speaks with us about his long and storied career; And writer Mia Alvarado takes us on a field trip to Stoner's Laundry, a laundromat that’s been a gathering place for a small neighborhood at the edge of downtown Colorado Springs for decades.

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San Simeon Films

Poet and essayist Gary Snyder is something of a living legend. He first rose to prominence in San Francisco in the 1950s as a central figure in the Beat Movement and San Francisco Poetry Renaissance. He read his poem “A Berry Feast” at the reading at which Allen Ginsberg debuted the poem “Howl,” and he was the inspiration for the character Japhy Ryder in Jack Kerouac’s 1958 novel, The Dharma Bums.

Noel Black

(Many poems in the slideshow NSFW or young eyes.)

In this episode of Wish We Were Here, we tell the story of Colorado Springs native Brian "Scoop" Nemeth, a man with high-functioning autism whose singular goal in life is to become "The Black Bill O'Reilly" — a national news and opinion anchor on the Fox News Network's prime-time broadcast.

Intermezzo Season Concert - St. Lawrence String Quartet

Apr 7, 2015

Location
Packard Hall
5 W. Cache La Poudre St. (map)

95.5FM Badger Mountain Translator Back on the Air!

Apr 6, 2015

Listeners who tune-in to KRCC in the Badger Mountain area on 95.5FM can rejoice.  KRCC heard from our Chief Engineer Joel Belik around 4 p.m. 4/6/15 that he was able to repair the translator and that KRCC is back on the air at 95.5FM!

Joel had been hindered by snow on his first attempts to make repairs, but today's wonderful weather finally granted him an opportunity to make it to the translator.  We have yet to find out if he had to walk the final stretch, which is quite possible.

Thanks for your patience listeners!

On this month's episode of The Big Something Radio Programme:

Become an EarlyBird. Win an iPad!

Mar 25, 2015

When you join now as an EarlyBird member, you will be entered into a drawing for an iPad Air 2 (WiFi, 64gb, Space Grey).  

EarlyBird members and all current Sustaining Members will be automatically entered into the drawing.  Additionally, while it would be awesome if you joined and supported KRCC, anyone that would like to enter this contest may by stopping by the station at 912 North Weber Street and filing out an entry form.  No donation is necessary. 

You may enter the contest until April 19th.  Good luck. 

Jonathan Worth

Activist, author, co-editor of the influential blog BoingBoing.net, contributor to The Guardian, The New York Times, and many other publications, Cory Doctorow is one of the essential voices of the twenty-first century. The author of numerous books, including Information Doesn't Want To Be Free, a book about earning a living in the Internet age, he’s also the author of the young adult novel Little Brother and its sequel, Homeland, both of which explore civil liberties and social activism in the age of the internet.

In 2002, retired FBI and CIA investigator Charlie Hess began writing letters Robert Charles Browne, a convicted murderer who claimed to have killed dozens of other people around the country. This episode of Wish We Were Here tells the story of their correspondence and the cold cases Hess would close with Browne's help.

Episode #5 of Wish We Were Here airs Friday, March 6 at 7 p.m. and Sunday, March 8 at 4 p.m.

You can subscribe to the podcast HERE.

Over the course of his career at NPR, Peter Breslow has covered stories all over the world—from war zones in the Middle East to a blues bar in Alabama. In the process, he’s earned some of the most prestigious awards in journalism. Now a senior producer at Weekend Edition, he’s helped to define the sound and scope of one of NPR’s signature programs. Breslow is in town teaching at Colorado College this month, and he’ll be giving a talk tomorrow on the CC campus. KRCC’s Jake Brownell spoke with Breslow in advance of that talk. 

50 years ago this year, two young artists from Lawrence Kansas, Gene and Jo-ann Bernofsky, joined forces with their friend Clark Rickert, a student at University of Colorado Boulder, and moved to Trinidad Colorado to start one of the most influential communes of the Hippie era, Drop City. In honor of the 50th anniversary of Drop City, arts and archaeology organizations across southern Colorado have planned exhibits and events exploring the history of the Commune.

Johnny Ryan

On this episode of Wish We Were Here, Producer Noel Black tells the story of a small community of kids who grew up in Colorado Springs with gay parents.

Jessica: The argument was, which is more harmful, a lesbian mother or a junkie father? I was subpoenaed to testify about my mom’s relationship.

 

Twitter

As the wife of an Army Colonel, Angela Ricketts knows firsthand the effects of war on the families of those who serve. In her acclaimed debut book, No Man's War: Irreverent Confessions of an Infantry Wife, she offers a behind-the-scenes look at the sacrifices made and the hardships endured by soldiers' spouses and children, and provides a rare glimpse into the tight-knit, sometimes insular community of military families. Hampton Sides, bestselling author of In The Kingdom of Ice, Blood and Thunder and Ghost Soldiers, spoke with Ricketts about her book.

 

After more than 200 episodes and nearly five years, Kathryn Eastburn has decided to retire The Middle Distance. It has been a pleasure to work with Kathryn, and we wish her all the best in her future endeavors, whatever they may be. If you've enjoyed reading/hearing her column over the years, we hope you'll  join us in thanking her in the comment section below. 

 

This cold January, Mama keeps the heat cranked up to 73 and only goes outside to put out the mail. She’s down to less than 90 pounds, her weight about the same as her age, but she still glides around on her little cat feet from chore to chore, all day long, every day. By the time I get up in the morning she has already unloaded the dishwasher, brought in the newspaper and read it, made the coffee and warmed up the biscuits.

WINTER ON THE RANCH – A COOL EXPERIENCE

Jan 11, 2015
Bing Images

The little sorrel mare plunges joyfully through the powdery drifts, like a carousel horse freed from its pole. Her shaggy winter coat is frosted with snow and when she pauses at the hilltop, she snorts steam and her sides heave with the effort. Yet, she tugs at the reins, seems eager to push on.

But not yet.

The view from here needs to be savored – silvery snow and dark evergreens are cast against the blue-jay sky over the Rocky Mountains near Granby.

The Middle Distance, 1.9.15: Migrations

Jan 8, 2015
Kathryn Eastburn

The plan was to fly, but at the last minute I decided to drive instead. I’d set aside a month to visit my mother on the Texas Gulf coast over Christmas and into the new year, and I reasoned it would be good to have my car for the month in Galveston, if the mechanic deemed it roadworthy for the 2,500-mile round trip.

MUSH! WINTER FUN GOES TO THE DOGS

Jan 4, 2015
Bing Images

There’s at least one way to have a blast of snowy fun without even standing up. And that’s tucked into a sled, sitting behind a team of yapping, churning, happy Huskies.

Dog-sledding has become increasingly popular in many Colorado mountain towns and ski areas as a different way to explore the winter wilderness. So whether or not you can ski or snowshoe, you can park your butt in a sled and let someone else do the work while you enjoy the scenery.

TWELVE WAYS TO SAVE ALL YEAR LONG

Dec 28, 2014
Bing Images

Planning a trip for 2015, but need to watch your budget? Consider visiting a destination in its off-season, when airfares and hotel rates are lowest. You may have to deal with less-than-perfect weather, but there are compensations.

Here are some places to visit in their off-season, where you might just find travel bargains.

JANUARY: Denver

The Denver Center for the Performing Arts is in full swing, with half a dozen different entertainments on tap. Speaking of taps, Denver’s famous for its fine micro-breweries, so tip one before the show.

Where to Find Santa Claus

Dec 21, 2014
PHOTOS: Rick DuVal

This time of year, you can find Santa Claus in every mall in America. In department stores and even discount stores. Ringing bells and coddling toddlers. But if you want the real Santa experience, you need to visit him where he lives.

The North Pole.

 

The tree lights twinkle silently on Christmas morning in our Kentucky living room. Beneath the lowest limbs, glassy-eyed baby dolls, circa 1960, lounge among piles of soft new pajamas and socks, awaiting the arms of three little girls.

I believe these are the happiest days of my mother’s life, when she sees us with our new dolls. It’s true that we asked for them, but in a roundabout way. 

“What do you want Santa to bring you?” she asks. 

“A football and shoulder pads,” says my older sister.

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