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Shots - Health News
9:18 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Fines Remain Rare Even As Health Data Breaches Multiply

ProPublica

In a string of meetings and press releases, the federal government's health watchdogs have delivered a stern message: They are cracking down on insurers, hospitals and doctors offices that don't adequately protect the security and privacy of medical records.

"We've now moved into an area of more assertive enforcement," Leon Rodriguez, then-director of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Civil Rights, warned at a privacy and security forum in December 2012.

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NPR Ed
9:08 am
Fri February 27, 2015

A Glut Of Ph.D.s Means Long Odds Of Getting Jobs

Jorge Cham is the creator of PHD Comics and received his doctorate in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. PHD (Piled Higher and Deeper) is a comic strip about life (or the lack thereof) in academia. See more of his work at www.phdcomics.com.
Jorge Cham/PhD Comics

This week marked National Adjunct Walkout Day, a protest to gain better working conditions for part-time college instructors.

Why are college professors from San Jose State U, to the City University of New York, taking to the streets like fast food workers?

They say they have something in common.

Adjuncts and other non-tenured faculty make up three-quarters of college and university teachers. Over the past decades, as this shift has taken place, there have been growing complaints that they work for lower wages and without access to health care and other benefits.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Rocker Gary Glitter Jailed For 16 Years For Child Sex Abuse

A court sketch of former glam rocker Gary Glitter, who was sentenced today to 16 years in prison for sexually abusing three schoolgirls.
Elizabeth Cook PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:50 am

Rocker Gary Glitter, best known for the stadium rock anthem "Rock & Roll (Part 2)," was sentenced to 16 years in prison for sex offenses during the 1970s and '80s against three girls between the ages of 8 and 13.

Glitter, whose real name is Paul Gadd, was sentenced today for attempted rape, four counts of indecent assault and one of having sex with a girl under 13, the BBC reports. A jury found the 70-year-old guilty of the charges on Feb. 5, and Judge Alistair McCreath said then that Glitter would remain jailed until his sentencing.

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Parallels
8:19 am
Fri February 27, 2015

After 6,000 Years, Time For A Renovation At Iraq's Citadel

Construction workers at the Erbil Citadel, which was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site last year.
Ari Shapiro NPR

A map of the northern Iraqi city of Erbil looks like a dart board: circles, radiating outward from a central core. The bull's eye sits high on a hill, crowned by ancient walls.

The Erbil Citadel has stood here for at least 6,000 years. It's one of the oldest — and possibly the oldest — continuously inhabited site on earth.

The stories coming from this region these days are primarily ones of destruction and war. But here, in the Citadel, there's a different narrative, that of a plan to rebuild, restore and revitalize this ancient site.

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The Two-Way
8:15 am
Fri February 27, 2015

9 People Found Dead In Southern Missouri

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 9:20 am

Police say a gunman is among nine people found dead in south-central Missouri, following a series of shootings in multiple locations Thursday night. The man was 36; police say he died from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

The attacks happened in Texas County, Mo., and the gunman's body was found in nearby Shannon County. Police say an elderly woman whose body was found in a residence seems to have died from natural causes. Seven other people died of gunshot wounds; one person who was wounded is in the hospital.

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Goats and Soda
8:11 am
Fri February 27, 2015

It Kills Germs For Up To Six Hours. Can It Wipe Out Ebola?

A health worker in Liberia washes up after leaving a clinic's Ebola isolation area.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Clean hands go a long way toward preventing the spread of many illnesses, including Ebola. But finding the right hand-wash to impede deadly germs is tricky.

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Bangladeshi-American Blogger Hacked To Death In Dhaka

People gather on the spot where Bangladeshi blogger Avijit Roy was killed in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Thursday.
Abir Abdullah EPA /Landov

A Bangladeshi-American blogger, whose writings denounced fundamentalist thought and earned him death threats from Islamist groups, was hacked to death by two attackers in Dhaka. Avijit Roy's wife, Rafida Ahmed, who was with him during the attack late Thursday, was severely wounded.

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Shots - Health News
7:09 am
Fri February 27, 2015

5 Things To Know About The Latest Supreme Court Challenge To Health Law

The Affordable Care Act will take center stage at the Supreme Court on March 4.
Drew Angerer Getty Images

The Affordable Care Act is once again before the Supreme Court.

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The Two-Way
6:48 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Senate OKs Full Funding For Homeland Security, Ahead Of Midnight Deadline

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 9:29 am

The Senate has voted to fund the Department of Homeland Security through Sept. 30, providing the agency with full funding. The bill does not include any provisions that would block President Obama's executive actions on immigration.

Both the House and Senate are holding votes Friday on bills to fund the DHS, and there's a chance the Senate might approve the House's new proposal of a three-week funding extension, to avoid a shutdown.

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The Two-Way
5:51 am
Fri February 27, 2015

More Details On 'Jihadi John': Early Run-Ins And Radicalization

A playground is seen in London, outside an address where Kuwaiti-born London computer programmer Mohammed Emwazi is believed to have lived. Emwazi has been identified as masked ISIS militant "Jihadi John."
Niklas Halle'n AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 9:13 am

More details are emerging about Mohammed Emwazi, the man identified as the militant seen in beheading videos released by the self-styled Islamic State. His name came out Thursday, and more details are emerging about his past.

Emwazi is a British citizen who was born in Kuwait and grew up in West London. He reportedly graduated from the University of Westminster with a degree in computer programming.

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Research News
5:42 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Science Says The Dress Is Blue

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
5:15 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Nation Riveted By Llamas On The Loose

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 5:42 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's All Politics
3:32 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Jeb Bush Takes 2016 Show Into Unfriendly Territory At CPAC

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush addresses the audience at his last Conservative Political Action Conference appearance in March 2013. Bush is to appear again Friday, as he considers a potential 2016 presidential campaign.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 9:30 am

For close to a decade, Jeb Bush's audiences have almost exclusively been people who have paid good money to hear him speak.

That changes today, when he appears at the Conservative Political Action Conference — where potential 2016 presidential rivals are already taking shots at him and some activists are organizing a walkout.

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NPR Story
3:03 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Britain Tries To Counter Extremists' Appeal

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 4:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Fri February 27, 2015

ISIS Video Shows Extremists Destroying Artifacts

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 5:42 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Task Force Proposes Fracking Rules To Colorado Governor

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 5:03 am

Copyright 2015 KUNC-FM. To see more, visit http://kunc.org.

Business
2:08 am
Fri February 27, 2015

White House Move To Protect Nest Eggs Sparks Hopes And Fears

President Obama makes remarks on his proposal to tighten consumer protections for people saving for retirement Monday at AARP as Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Labor Secretary Tom Perez listen.
Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 5:42 am

The Obama administration is creating new protections for Americans saving and investing for retirement, but industry groups say the new rules could hurt the very people the president says he wants to help

If you're building a retirement nest egg, big fees are the dangerous predators looking to feast on it. The White House says too many financial advisers get hidden kickbacks or sales incentives to steer responsible Americans toward bad retirement investments with low returns and high fees.

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All Tech Considered
1:45 am
Fri February 27, 2015

'Ballot Selfies' Clash With The Sanctity Of Secret Polling

A man takes a "selfie" while waiting in line to cast his vote in the Wisconsin gubernatorial race in November.
Darren Hauck Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 5:42 am

From Pope Francis and President Obama to the kid down the block, we have, for better or worse, become a world full of selfie-takers.

But as ubiquitous as they are, there are some places where selfies remain controversial — like the voting booth. The legal battle rages over so-called "ballot selfies" in the state that holds the first presidential primary.

This may be a fight of the digital age, but according to New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner, it involves a very old American ideal — the sanctity of the secret ballot.

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U.S.
1:40 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Colorado Pushes For Concealed Guns In K-12 Schools

Colorado educators take part in a concealed carry course in Englewood, Colo. on Nov. 8, open to all state school employees. Participants who complete the training are eligible to apply for a permit to carry a handgun.
MATTHEW STAVER Landov

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 5:42 am

Patrick Neville was a 15-year-old sophomore at Columbine High School in 1999. He was on his way to a fast food lunch when the shooting started.

Two students, armed with guns and pipe bombs, had stormed the Colorado school, on their way to killing one teacher and 12 students — some were Neville's friends.

Neville, now a Colorado State Representative, says that many of Columbine's teachers and faculty acted heroically that day.

But, he says, "I truly believe that had some of them had the legal authority to be armed, more of my friends might be with me today."

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Television
1:39 am
Fri February 27, 2015

This Season On 'House Of Cards,' It's Tough To Be The Boss

Kevin Spacey's President Frank Underwood is embattled and often frustrated in the third season of Netflix's House of Cards.
David Giesbrecht Courtesy of Netflix

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 9:13 am

When House of Cards' third season opens, Kevin Spacey's murderous politician Frank Underwood is fooling the world again.

From the very first scene, he's bringing a presidential motorcade to his tiny hometown of Gaffney, S.C., pretending to honor his father's grave for the press.

"Nobody showed up for his funeral except me, not even my mother," Underwood says in one of those sly asides where he speaks directly to the audience. "But I'll tell you this: When they bury me, it won't be in my backyard. And when they pay their respects, they'll have to wait in line."

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The Salt
1:38 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Stone Age Britons Were Eating Wheat 2,000 Years Before They Farmed It

A field of unharvested wheat is seen in Ashby-de-la-Zouch, England, in 2012. Wheat wasn't cultivated in Britain until some 6,000 years ago, but DNA evidence suggests early Britons were eating the grain at least 8,000 years ago.
Darren Staples Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:45 am

Scientists have learned a lot about our distant ancestors from DNA that's thousands of years old. Like the fact that we've inherited some Neanderthal DNA, so apparently our ancestors mated with them. Now there's new research from DNA that moves on from paleo-mating to paleo-eating.

About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers in the Near East figured out how to grow cereal crops like wheat. The farming culture spread, and wherever it went, people traded in their spears for plows.

That's the conventional view. Apparently, it was more complicated than that.

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StoryCorps
1:36 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Obama To Ambitious Teen: 'You Have This Strength Inside Yourself'

President Barack Obama participates in a "My Brother's Keeper" StoryCorps interview with Noah McQueen in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Feb. 20.
Chuck Kennedy The White House

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 9:01 am

Noah McQueen is part of "My Brother's Keeper," a White House program aimed at young men of color.

His teen years have been rough, and include several arrests and a short period of incarceration. But last week, he was at the White House. The 18-year-old sat down for a StoryCorps interview with President Obama, who wanted to know more about Noah's life.

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Goats and Soda
1:35 am
Fri February 27, 2015

A 10-Hour Ride, A Welcome With Cola Nuts, A Sad Yet Hopeful New Normal

Twins Watta and Fatta Balyon pose for a picture outside their guardian Mamuedeh Kanneh's house.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 5:42 am

They hired a car and drove for ten hours over the most rutted dirt roads you can imagine, dodging motorbikes and pedestrians and overloaded cars all the way.

It was December. NPR producers John Poole and Sami Yenigun had come to see what happens to a village after Ebola has struck.

Barkedu is a beautiful place, green and forested. Tall hills start to rise near its border with Guinea. Cows and chickens roam around the village, which is built on the side of the Lofa River. A small stream runs through Barkedu, where people bath and wash their clothes.

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Code Switch
7:41 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

As First Black American NHL Player, Enforcer Was Defenseless Against Racism

Val James of the Toronto Maple Leafs takes warmup prior to a preseason game against the Boston Bruins at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in 1986.
Graig Abel Collection Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 8:03 am

The first black American hockey player in NHL history is telling his story almost 30 years after he retired.

Val James was a revered and feared fighter — known in hockey as an enforcer — during short stints for the Buffalo Sabres and the Toronto Maple Leafs in the 1980s. But he was defenseless to the racist taunts and slurs that showered down on him from opposing teams' fans.

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National Security
5:14 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Families Of Sept. 11 Victims Watch Guantanamo Hearings With Mixed Feelings

Relatives of victims of the Sept. 11 attacks are periodically flown down to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to witness court proceedings against five men accused of plotting the attacks. For the witnesses of the most recent court session, the experience raised questions about justice, humanity and the ethics of the death penalty.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:42 pm

Thad Rasmussen, 36, lost his mother, Rhonda, in the Sept. 11 attacks; she died at the Pentagon. This month, he sat in a courtroom at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and looked at five men accused of planning those attacks.

"It was very difficult to see them as humans," he says.

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Parallels
4:11 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

For One Parliamentarian, A Stronger Jordan Is Key To Fighting ISIS

Jordan's election laws make it impossible for any one political party to build a strong bloc in Parliament. Observers say that's one reason for the country's weakness — and for the growing appeal of the messages used by militants of the self-proclaimed Islamic State.
Khalil Mazraawi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:42 pm

There's a election law implemented in 2010 in Jordan known as "one person, one vote" that advocates of reform and democratization there regard, surprisingly, as a big step backward.

That's because of the strong ties Jordanians feel to family, clan and tribe, says Omar Razzaz, an economist and banker in Amman, the Jordanian capital.

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Cities Project
4:11 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Living Small In The City: With More Singles, Micro-Housing Gets Big

Jay Austin's tiny house in Washington, D.C., has 10-foot ceilings, a loft bed over the bathroom and a galley-style kitchen.
Franklyn Cater NPR

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 9:05 am

Back in 2012, something unusual got started in an alleyway in an already tightly developed part of northeast Washington, D.C.

On an 11th-of-an-acre lot next to a cemetery, behind a block of row houses, tiny houses started to go up. And not just one little house in backyard, like you might see in many places. The builders billed this as an urban tiny house community.

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The Two-Way
3:15 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Ahead Of Netanyahu's Speech To Congress, Hints Of A Thaw

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 6:25 pm

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will reportedly meet with Sens. Mitch McConnell, the Senate majority leader, and Harry Reid, D-Nev., the chamber's top Democrat, after his March 3 speech to Congress.

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Author Interviews
3:09 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

'Don't Be Afraid Of The Bullets' A Memoir Of Reporting In Yemen

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:42 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Middle East
3:09 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

ISIS's 'Jihadi John' Revealed As Londoner Born In Kuwait

Originally published on Fri February 27, 2015 6:47 am

NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with Washington Post contributor Souad Mekhennet. The Post broke the news about the identity of "Jihadi John," the masked man with a British accent who has beheaded several hostages held by the Islamic State and who speaks directly to the camera in ISIS videos. The identity was revealed as Mohammed Emwazi, a Briton from a well-to-do family who grew up in West London and graduated college with a degree in computer programming.

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