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The Two-Way
7:40 am
Tue September 10, 2013

World's Largest Ferris Wheel Takes Shape In Las Vegas

The 55-story High Roller, which will be the world's largest Ferris wheel, is scheduled to open in early 2014.
Isaac Brekken AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:41 pm

Las Vegas is adding an eye-catching tourist attraction, in the form of a huge wheel that can take more than 1,000 people on a ride 550 feet into the sky over the city's famed Strip. The main construction of the wheel, called the High Roller, is nearly finished; it is expected to open in early 2014.

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The Two-Way
6:57 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Got 'Ya Web: Jimmy Kimmel Was Behind 'Worst Twerk Fail EVER'

Talk about hot pants: A screen image from the "Worst Twerk Fail EVER" video.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:47 am

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The Two-Way
6:06 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Breakthrough? Syria Hints It Might Give Up Chemical Weapons

In Washington, D.C., this week, there have been demonstrations both in favor of and against a military strike on targets in Syria. Outside the White House on Monday, supporters of Syrian President Bashar Assad waved a Syrian flag with his face on it.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 2:04 pm

(We most recently updated this post at 4:02 p.m. ET.)

Amid reports that Syrian President Bashar Assad may be willing to give up his chemical weapons, as his strongest ally has suggested he do, the Obama administration expressed skepticism Tuesday.

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Around the Nation
5:39 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Ordinary Americans React To Calls For Strikes On Syria

Soldiers rappel at the Sabalauski Air Assault School at Fort Campbell, Ky.
U.S. Army Jennifer Andersson AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:55 am

Before we hear from President Obama Tuesday night, let's hear now from some concerned citizens. The president will go on television to ask for support to press Syria to stop using chemical weapons.

Polls suggest Americans are largely opposed to military strikes in Syria. For a sampling of opinions we have reports from Pennsylvania, Los Angeles and Kentucky.

We begin at a place whose residents know a lot about overseas conflicts: Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Our report is from Blake Farmer of member station WPLN.

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The Two-Way
5:17 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Book News: NoViolet Bulawayo, Jhumpa Lahiri Shortlisted For Booker Prize

NoViolet Bulawayo is a Zimbabwean author. She is currently a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University.
Smeeta Mahanti Courtesy Reagan Arthur Books

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

  • The shortlist for the Man Booker Prize, Britain's most prestigious literary award, was announced Tuesday morning. Although the prize is limited to writers from the British Commonwealth and the Republic of Ireland, the list skews international, and includes authors from Zimbabwe, New Zealand and Canada. The complete shortlist is:

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The Two-Way
4:43 am
Tue September 10, 2013

4 Men Convicted In Rape And Murder That Shocked India

A police bus believed to be carrying the four men convicted for the December rape and murder.
Money Sharma EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 9:11 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Julie McCarthy, in New Delhi, speaks with Renee Montagne

Four men convicted Tuesday for the December rape and murder of a young woman on a bus in India are due to learn Wednesday whether they will be sentenced to death by hanging.

From New Delhi, NPR's Julie McCarthy reported on Morning Edition that there's great "political pressure ... to mete out the most extreme punishment." She called the guilty verdicts "a moment that the family [of the victim] and the country has been waiting for."

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Around the Nation
4:31 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Masked Crusaders Save Cat From Burning House

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. John Buckland and Troy Marcum of Milton, West Virginia were superheroes when they rescued a cat from a burning home. WCHS-TV reports the two men were mentoring children at an American Legion Post wearing Batman and Captain America costumes when they saw smoke at a nearby house. The masked crusaders rushed over and after the cat was resuscitated by Batman, it took one look and hissed. You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
4:24 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Cubs Fan Continues Wait For World Series Win

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

This next news story has been a tradition since roughly 1908. It's the story of a Chicago Cubs fan waiting to win the World Series. The News-Sun says Doris Davis has been a fan since 1926. In the days before TV, she listened on the radio while moving players around a diamond she made from a checkerboard. And she's still waiting for that championship. As the season nears its end, the Cubs are 22 games out of first.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Middle East
3:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

2 Democratic Senators Propose Alternate Plan For Syria

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

President Obama on Tuesday meets with Democratic senators to press his case for military action against Syria. Two moderate senators are offering an alternative plan. It would delay military action for 45 days, and give Bashar Assad another chance to get rid of his chemical weapons. Steve Inskeep talks to Sen. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota about the plan.

Politics
3:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Tea Party Won't Let Congress Forget Obamacare Issues

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Congress did not expect to spend September debating Syria. Many Republicans, instead, were planning battles over the budget and over the healthcare law that's about to take affect. Tea Party activists are going ahead with meetings on their issues. One event comes in Washington D.C. today. NPR's Don Gonyea has been talking with activists.

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Asia
3:11 am
Tue September 10, 2013

India Court Convicts 4 Men In Fatal Gang Rape

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A judge in New Delhi has just delivered his guilty verdict for four men who raped and murdered a young woman on a city bus back in December. It was one of the most high profile cases in Indian history. The horrific crime stirred a national debate over the country's lax prosecution of crimes against women and became an international issue as well. We talk to NPR's Julie McCarthy who was at the courthouse. Good morning.

JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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Politics
1:39 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Colorado Voters To Decide 2 Lawmakers' Fates In Recall Elections

State Sens. Angela Giron and John Morse, both Democrats, face recall elections Tuesday. The battle in Colorado has attracted major players from across the nation, reflecting the sustained intensity over the issue of gun rights.
Ed Andrieski AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 12:01 pm

Two prominent Democratic state senators could lose their jobs after lawmakers passed sweeping gun control laws following the theater shooting in Auro, Colo., and the Newtown school shooting in Connecticut. Gun rights activists collected enough signatures to force the historic recall elections.

The recalls follow a combative and bitter legislative session. Among the most controversial measures passed were universal background checks and limiting high-capacity magazines to 15 rounds.

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Author Interviews
1:05 am
Tue September 10, 2013

During Katrina, 'Memorial' Doctors Chose Who Lived, Who Died

Floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina fill the streets near downtown New Orleans on Aug. 30, 2005.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

On Aug. 30, 2005, a doctor climbed the stairs through a New Orleans hospital to the helipad, which was rarely used, and so old and rusted it wasn't even painted with the hospital's current name.

From that helipad over Memorial Medical Center, the doctor looked out over New Orleans, now flooding after Hurricane Katrina. He considered the more than 2,000 people in the hospital below — 244 of them patients.

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Code Switch
1:04 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Congress Honors Victims Of Infamous Alabama Church Bombing

One man was convicted in the bombing in 1977, but more than two decades would pass before any other suspects were tried for murder.
AP

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 8:32 am

On Tuesday, Congress will bestow its highest civilian honor — posthumously — on the young victims of a deadly Alabama church bombing from the civil rights era.

The Congressional Gold Medals for Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley come 50 years after the black girls were killed by a Ku Klux Klan bomb.

Just as the federal recognition is long in coming, so was justice.

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History
1:04 am
Tue September 10, 2013

Remembering A 'Brave,' 'Lucky' Hero In The War Of 1812

The U.S. Brig Niagara is a replica of the ship Oliver Hazard Perry sailed to victory. The Niagara carries four carronades, or short-range cannons. The original ship was outfitted with 18 carronades that could shoot a 32-pound ball about half a mile.
Ryan Whaley Green Door Mediawork

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

Two hundred years ago today, a young U.S. naval captain named Oliver Hazard Perry penned the words, "We have met the enemy and they are ours ..."

Perry's remarkable victory over the British changed the course of the War of 1812, and a full-scale re-enactment — the largest sailing re-enactment ever attempted in the U.S. — recently commemorated the anniversary of the win in the Battle of Lake Erie.

A Bit Of History

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Education
4:07 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

School Districts Struggle To Get Principals To Stay Put

Lila Hillman is starting her first year as principal at Milwaukee Parkside School for the Arts in Wisconsin. Nearly one-fifth of the city's public schools have new principals this year.
Erin Toner WUWM

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 10:06 am

At Milwaukee Parkside School for the Arts on the south side of Milwaukee, kids are back in class and getting their bearings in the sprawling building. So is Lila Hillman, the school's brand-new principal. She has to figure out where everything is, who everyone is, how to run a school — and how to answer everyone's questions.

As Hillman walks through the halls, one teacher wants to know where to hang a cutout of a tree trunk. A few steps later, a janitor asks why all the lights went out in the school the night before.

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Found Recipes
4:07 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

This Football Season, Grab Some PB&J And Spread Your Wings

Sunny Anderson came up with the recipe when trying to find new flavor combinations for chicken wings.
John Lee

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:20 pm

The regular NFL season has officially started, which — for many viewers — means hours of excitement (and angst) fueled by chips and dip, sliders, nachos and, of course, chicken wings.

Sunny Anderson, a personality on the Food Network and author of Sunny's Kitchen: Easy Food For Real Life, is a big fan of wings.

"Wings are great because they're primal. First of all, you're eating with your fingers; you're gnawing meat off the bone, you know what I mean, and there's a good meat-to-skin ratio," she says.

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All Tech Considered
4:07 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Smartwatch Is Next Step In 'Quantified Self' Life-Logging

Samsung's new Galaxy Gear smartwatch marks a new generation of wearable devices.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:20 pm

You could call it the phantom menace. Each year, in the midst of winter, a rumor surfaces about a new Apple product that sets tech bloggers buzzing.

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It's All Politics
3:42 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Constituent Mailbag: A Deluge Of Opposition To Syria Strikes

Protesters against U.S. military action in Syria march to Capitol Hill from the White House on Saturday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 4:28 pm

Rep. Jim Himes is willing to vote against the wishes of his constituents. Probably not this time, though.

"Like the rest of the country, my constituency is pretty much opposed to the intervention in Syria," says the Connecticut Democrat. "Since health care reform, I haven't seen an issue that energized as many people."

His colleagues in the House and Senate report the same.

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Shots - Health News
3:42 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

How Expansion Will Change The Look Of Medicaid

What will Medicaid look like in the future?
University of Michigan

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 2:22 pm

Starting in January, it will get a lot easier for millions of people across to the country to qualify for Medicaid.

Adults making up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level ($15,856 in 2013) will be able to sign up for Medicaid, under an expansion paid for entirely by the federal government between 2014 and 2017.

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Shots - Health News
3:33 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Microbe Transplants Treat Some Diseases That Drugs Can't Fix

Billie Iverson, 86, of Cranston, R.I., recently underwent a transplant of intestinal microbes that likely saved her life.
Ryan T. Conaty for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:20 pm

Billie Iverson may be getting up there, but for an 86-year-old, she's still plenty active.

"I take trips, and I go do my own shopping, and I take myself to the doctor," Iverson says. "I do everything. I don't let anything stop me."

But one day, she got hit with something she'd never experienced — the worst case of the runs ever.

For days at a time, off and on for weeks, the problem kept coming back. Iverson eventually got so weak, she ended up in a nursing home.

"I just thought maybe I wasn't going to make it," she says. "I thought I was going to die."

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The Two-Way
3:32 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Obama: Diplomatic Solution In Syria Is 'Overwhelmingly My Preference'

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:16 pm

After much diplomatic wrangling, President Obama on Monday left open the possibility of a diplomatic solution in Syria, saying a proposal allowing Syria to give up its chemical weapons was a "potentially positive development."

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The Salt
3:31 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Rye Bother? An Inside-The-Barrel Look At American Whiskeys

America's Signature Whiskey: Some craft distilleries, like Catoctin Creek in Virginia, are making a whiskey that's 100 percent rye to showcase the grain's spicy, peppery flavor.
Courtesy of Catoctin Creek

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 12:18 pm

Ten years ago rye whiskey was on the brink of extinction.

Despite its venerable history as the whiskey made by George Washington, only a handful of distillers were bottling this quintessentially American spirit. And you definitely couldn't order a rye Manhattan at your local cocktail lounge.

My, how times have changed.

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World Cafe
3:23 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

The Head And The Heart On World Cafe

Seattle's The Head and the Heart recently performed on World Cafe.
Josh Principe The Billions Corporation

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 12:29 pm

This session, from Dec. 12, 2011, is the second in our Vintage Cafe series, where we revisit some of our best studio performances.

The Head and the Heart was formed after five twentysomethings met at an open mic night in Seattle.

"None of us knew each other beforehand," recalls singer Josiah Johnson. "I just happened to go to the same open mic. [Jonathan Russell] played some songs and I played some songs, then we started talking and hanging out."

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Europe
2:57 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Skateboarders Mobilize As Art Center Tries To Reclaim Cavern

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

In medieval times, the south bank of the River Thames in London was full of seedy theaters, brothels and scoundrels. But centuries later, it has become one of the world's finest centers for the arts. Recent plans to expand the arts center has revealed a uniquely, contemporary conflict. As NPR's Philip Reeves reports, this conflict is reviving grassroots activism in Britain's capital.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Europe
2:57 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Loser In Moscow Mayoral Election The One That's Made News

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

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Law
2:57 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Basic Internet Economics At Stake In Net Neutrality Suit

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:20 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Time now for All Tech Considered.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

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The Two-Way
2:45 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Police Question George Zimmerman After Confrontation With Wife

George Zimmerman leaves court with his family after a jury found him not guilty in the murder of Trayvon Martin, in Sanford, Fla., on July 14.
Joe Burbank AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:26 pm

George Zimmerman, the former neighborhood watch volunteer acquitted in the killing of Trayvon Martin, was questioned by police Monday, after his wife called 911, saying Zimmerman was threatening her with a gun and knife.

The AP reports:

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National Security
2:36 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

U.S. Mulls Over More Possible Targets For Syria Strike

The U.S. is considering adding helicopters to its list of potential targets of a military strike. Here, rebel fighters are seen on a Russian-made helicopter seized from the Syrian army at the Minnig Military Airport near the Turkish border on Aug. 11.
Mahmoud Hassano Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:20 pm

As U.S. lawmakers weigh whether to support an attack on the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad, military planners have expanded the target list for a potential strike.

The Pentagon had been focused on attacking Syria with so-called standoff weapons — cruise missiles, for example. Launched from ships, they can attack Syrian positions without placing American pilots in danger. Cruise missiles are very precise, and perfect for hitting fixed targets, such as command-and-control centers the Syrian military relies on.

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Monkey See
2:31 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

A Toronto Film Chat, From Two Jake Gyllenhaals To Three Daniel Radcliffes

Jesse Eisenberg stars in The Double, which is screening at the Toronto International Film Festival.
Toronto International Film Festival

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:20 pm

Bob Mondello and I took a break from our time at the Toronto International Film Festival today for a chat withAll Things Consideredand host Audie Cornish. We filled her in on just how many movies we've both seen, the surplus of stories about doppelgangers, the adventures of Daniel Radcliffe, and what we think are the early awards contenders.

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