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3:04 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Draft Of 'Like A Rolling Stone' Sells At Auction

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 10:48 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business. "Like A Rolling Stone" - the only handwritten copy of that famous Bob Dylan song about a person down on his luck, sold at auction this week to someone who clearly isn't.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

An anonymous bidder got it for $2 million. That's believed to be a record. This draft version of the song also includes rejected phrases, including dry vermouth, you'll tell the truth - also, something about Al Capone leading into the line, like a complete unknown.

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Asia
1:33 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Beijing: From Hardship Post To Plum Assignment And Back Again

A woman wearing face protection walks across a street during a hazy day in Beijing on March 27. Worsening air pollution is fueling a slow exodus of expatriates from the Chinese capital.
Petar Kujundzic Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:48 am

As Beijing's notorious air pollution continues to take a toll on people's health, it's also making it much harder for foreign firms to attract staff there these days. Some companies are now offering more money, more vacation and shorter stints to lure people to China's capital. What was once a plum assignment for expatriates is increasingly seen as a hardship post.

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Heirs Of The Revolution: A Changing Cuba
1:29 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Cuba's Mariel Port: Once An Escape, Now A Window To The Future

A fisherman walks the streets of Mariel, on Cuba's northwest coast. In the distance, construction is underway on the Port of Mariel, where the government is creating a special free-trade zone.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 8:20 am

When you arrive at the Jose Marti International Airport in Havana, you're greeted with a barrage of billboards with the popular Cuban government slogan promoting tourism: "Cuba, where the past and the present converge."

Perhaps nowhere on the island is that statement more true than in the city of Mariel, about 30 miles from Havana on the northwestern coast.

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Sweetness And Light
1:28 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Deford: NCAA Says Amateurism Is Alive And Well, But The Jig Is Up

Wisconsin's Traevon Jackson at practice for the 2014 NCAA men's college basketball tournament. Commentator Frank Deford says that, despite NCAA claims to the contrary, most college players are not typical students — "their job is to play a sport."
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 10:48 am

Amateurism is dead, revealed so in the trial against the NCAA now in progress in Oakland, Calif., U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken presiding. Before her skeptical eyes, amateurism has been laid out naked on a courtroom slab for a jury of all fans to see that it has no beating heart.

Amateurism, Judge Wilken has been told in the case, commonly known as the O'Bannon trial, nobly protects college athletes from being exploited by evil outsiders — so the NCAA knighthood was created in order that colleges could tie up athletes all by themselves.

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Parallels
1:27 am
Wed June 25, 2014

How Much Does A Terrorist Attack Cost? A Lot Less Than You'd Think

Fighters from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria march in Raqaa, Syria, in a picture posted on Jan. 14. The group is believed to hold as much as $2 billion.
AP

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:28 am

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria is flush with cash, and holds as much as $2 billion. Counterterrorism officials say the group knows how to use that money to its advantage. It's showing a kind of professional acumen and discipline that sets it apart from other terrorist organizations. But what kinds of attacks can its money buy?

Back in 2006, when Germany was hosting the World Cup soccer tournament, a terrorist attack was narrowly averted. With bombs hidden in their suitcases, two men in their 20s boarded commuter trains in the city of Cologne.

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Around the Nation
1:25 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Trouble In Paradise: Opiate Use Spikes On Martha's Vineyard

A cache of Percocet and other opiates seized by Oak Bluffs police in an arrest earlier this year.
Courtesy of Oak Bluffs Police

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 10:48 am

Underneath the charm of Martha's Vineyard's picturesque beaches, peaceful woods and luxury homes is a problem: Since August, there have been six overdose deaths on the island.

"That's a phenomenal rate for a community of 16,000 people — and that's not to mention the overdoses that haven't been fatal," says Charles Silberstein, an addiction specialist and psychiatrist at Martha's Vineyard Hospital. "We've had overdoses for years, but I don't think we've ever seen this kind of number or frequency."

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The Two-Way
5:24 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Methodists Reinstate Minister Who Officiated At Son's Gay Marriage

United Methodist minister Frank Schaefer (right) hugs the Rev. David Wesley Brown after a news conference Tuesday at First United Methodist Church of Germantown, Pa. Schaefer was reinstated by the church after being defrocked for presiding over his son's same-sex wedding ceremony.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:24 pm

A Methodist minister in Pennsylvania, who was defrocked last year for presiding over his son's same-sex wedding, has been reinstated by the church.

A nine-person appeals panel of the United Methodist Church ordered Frank Schaefer's pastoral credentials restored, saying "the jury that convicted him last year erred when fashioning his punishment," according to The Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
5:01 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

'Star Wars' Museum Lands In Chicago

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 6:08 am

Star Wars creator George Lucas has chosen Chicago as the location of a planned museum of his art and movie memorabilia.

A spokesman for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel says the Lucas Cultural Arts Museum will be built in the Windy City.

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The Salt
3:49 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

'Natural' Food Sounds Good But Doesn't Mean Much

Advocates say consumers may assume that the "natural" label is the same as "organic."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 7:50 am

Some people have had it with "natural" food.

For fifteen years, Urvashi Rangan, director of consumer safety and sustainability for Consumer Reports, has been pointing out that "natural" is just about the most misleading label that you'll ever see on a food package. Yet consumers still look for that word, food companies still love to use it and the Food and Drug Administration can't or won't define it.

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All Tech Considered
3:25 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

A New Jersey Law That's Kept Smart Guns Off Shelves Nationwide

The Armatix smart gun is implanted with an electronic chip that allows it to be fired only if the shooter is wearing a watch that communicates with it through a radio signal. It is not sold in the U.S.
Michael Dalder Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 9:51 am

A gun that fires only in the hands of its owner isn't science fiction anymore. A so-called smart gun is already on sale in Europe. But you won't find it on store shelves in this country — in part because of an obscure New Jersey law that's had unintended consequences for the rest of the nation.

Basically, the Childproof Handgun Law of 2002 says that once "personalized handguns are available" anywhere in the country, all handguns sold in New Jersey must be smart guns within 30 months.

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Politics
3:25 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Meet The New Stars Of Campaign Ads: Mom And Dad

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., talks with her father, former New Orleans Mayor Moon Landrieu, on Feb. 1. The two appear together in recent television ads for her re-election campaign.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

It's the summer of a campaign year and once again the airwaves, the Internet, and likely your own Facebook and other social media feeds are full of political ads.

In the primaries, we've already seen ads featuring cartoon turtles, gator wrestling, lots of dogs, horses and, of course, guns — propped against pickup trucks or resting over shoulders.

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Politics
3:25 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Addressing Border Crisis, Politicians Find Invitation In Misperception

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

The House Committee on Homeland Security held a hearing Tuesday to address the influx of unaccompanied immigrant children from Central America. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson spoke at the proceedings, saying the situation at the border was "urgent."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Deceptive Cadence
3:24 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

New York Philharmonic's Lead Fiddler Rests His Bow

Glenn Dicterow joined the New York Philharmonic as its concertmaster in 1980. He has performed as its soloist every year since.
Chris Lee Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 9:58 am

Most people who attend symphony performances can spot the concertmaster. That's the first chair violinist who enters before the conductor and helps tune the orchestra. But the all important position calls for much more than that — from playing tricky solos to shaping the sound of the string section.

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The Two-Way
3:09 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Living Up To His Past, Suarez Apparently Bites Italian Opponent

Uruguay's Luis Suarez sits on the pitch after apparently biting Italy's Giorgio Chiellini during a World Cup soccer match in Brazil on Tuesday.
Hassan Ammar AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:55 pm

In some ways, we should have seen it coming. By the time Uruguay's Luis Suarez apparently took a bite out of Italian defender Giorgio Chiellini in Tuesday's match, the ref had already handed out a red card and three yellows.

Chiellini dropped to the ground, writhing, pulling his shirt off his shoulder. And Suarez dropped too, grabbing at his teeth, like they'd been attacked by Chiellini's shoulder. The ref paid no mind, and eventually both men continued their trot across the World Cup stage like nothing happened.

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Energy
2:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

In Wyoming, Going Deep To Draw Energy From Coal

Linc Energy has installed 44 monitoring wells at its proposed test site near Wright, Wyo., to establish baseline water quality.
Stephanie Joyce for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 7:42 am

The United States is the Saudi Arabia of coal. The only catch is that most coal is buried too deep for conventional mining.

In the tradition of fracking pioneers in the oil and gas industries, an Australian company working in Wyoming wants to use an unconventional technique to access that deep coal: burning it underground.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Report Points To 'Dangerous Militarization' Of U.S. Law Enforcement

During a drill, SWAT team members prepare to secure a ship in Bainbridge Island, Wash.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:09 pm

U.S. law enforcement at all levels has undergone a dangerous militarization in recent years, with heavily armed SWAT teams being deployed to serve warrants and for drug searches, but rarely for the hostage situations they were designed for, the American Civil Liberties Union says in a new report.

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Shots - Health News
2:35 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

3-D Mammography Finds More Tumors, But Questions Remain

A standard digital mammogram, left, compared to a 3-D tomosynthesis mammogram, right.
Courtesy of Hologic

A form of mammogram that takes multiple images does a slightly better job of finding tumors and reducing women's risk of having to be scanned again, a study finds.

It's the biggest study yet to look at tomosynthesis, also called 3-D mammograms. But it's still unclear if using this kind of mammogram increases a woman's odds of surviving breast cancer, the researchers say.

Rather, it found that the 3-D mammograms reduced the rate of recalls, where women had to have more scanning or a biopsy, by 1.6 percent.

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Asia
2:18 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

In Rift Over Interfaith Ban, A New Fault Line For Burmese Politics

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:50 am

Myanmar's parliament is now considering a bill that would restrict marriages of people from different religions. Buddhist nationalists hope it will protect their religion from the spread of Islam and claim it's a way to prevent coerced conversions, but critics lambaste the proposed law as targeting the country's Muslim minority.

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Asia
2:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Iraqi Crisis Brings Focus On Indian Migrants Who Seek Profit Amid Peril

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. When ISIS militants took control of wide swaths of northern Iraq, foreign workers in those areas ended up being trapped. India is working to win the release of some 40 of its citizens abducted in the Iraqi city of Mosul. There are also hundreds more in other locations who are clamoring to leave. NPR's Julie McCarthy reports.

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Technology
2:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

A Wild West In Flight: Drones Outpace The Rules Reining Them In

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:49 am

Drone technology has moved at a quicker pace than the rules regulating their use, creating an environment that journalist Craig Whitlock likens to the Wild West. He talks with Audie Cornish about what he learned in the course of reporting his series "Hazard Above," which addresses the safety record of drones for The Washington Post.

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Education
2:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

A 'Major Shift' In Oversight Of Special Education

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan says states must ensure progress for students with disabilities.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

The Obama administration said Tuesday that the vast majority of the 6.5 million students with disabilities in U.S. schools today are not receiving a quality education, and that it will hold states accountable for demonstrating that those students are making progress.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced what he calls "a major shift" in how the government evaluates the effectiveness of federally funded special education programs.

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Iraq
2:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

U.S. Faces Challenges In Shoring Up Iraq's Crumbling Military

The Iraqi army left behind equipment, including body armor and vehicles, as Sunni militants overran the northern city of Mosul earlier this month.
Safin Hamed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 6:19 pm

Rick Brennan remembers sitting around Baghdad back in 2011 with some fellow U.S. military planners. Talk turned to the Iraqi army of the future. In one scenario, they pictured the Iraqi army falling apart, splintering along ethnic lines.

"We painted a worst-case scenario, a nightmare scenario, that was exactly what we're seeing take place right now," Brennan says.

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Iraq
2:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

At Iraq's Largest Oil Refinery, Siege Nears A Complicated Conclusion

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Code Switch
2:15 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has designed a map of Native American tribes showing their locations before first contact with Europeans.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 5:14 pm

Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived.

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.

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The Two-Way
1:30 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Draft Of Bob Dylan's 'Like A Rolling Stone' Sells For $2 Million

A photo provided by Sotheby's shows a page from a working draft of Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone." The draft sold for more than $2 million.
AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 4:42 pm

This post was updated at 5:50 p.m. ET.

Lyrics scribbled on hotel stationery circa 1965 that later became one of the most iconic rock songs of all time, Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone," has fetched more than $2 million in an auction at Sotheby's.

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The Two-Way
12:55 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Federal Judge Rules No-Fly List Process Is Unconstitutional

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 3:21 pm

A federal judge in Oregon says the process surrounding the federal government's "no-fly list" is unconstitutional.

Specifically, U.S. District Judge Anna Brown said the process doesn't give Americans on the list an effective way to challenge their inclusion.

The Oregonian reports:

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The Two-Way
12:18 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

NTSB: Too Much Technology, Too Little Training Caused Asiana Crash

Asiana Flight 214 crashed at San Francisco International Airport in July 2013. The NTSB concluded Tuesday that an over-reliance on automated systems contributed to the crash.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 1:32 pm

Pilot misjudgment and an over-reliance on automated systems were the main causes of last year's crash of Asiana Flight 214 in San Francisco that killed three people, the National Transportation Safety Board concluded Tuesday.

The Boeing 777 with 307 people aboard came in too low and too slow in its landing approach, the NTSB said. It hit a seawall, ripping off the tail and sending the plane's fuselage skidding down the tarmac.

The board said there was confusion over whether the plane was maintaining adequate speed for landing.

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The Fresh Air Interview
12:02 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Mary Gauthier De-Romanticizes Romantic Love

"Music and books, I think, were the two things I trusted the most as a child," Mary Gauthier says.
Jack Spencer Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 12:28 pm

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Shots - Health News
11:29 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Never Too Young: Pediatricians Say Parents Should Read To Infants

Cuddling up to read a story with the very young helps them recognize words and learn vocabulary, researchers say.
Jo Unruh iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 2:29 pm

Children whose parents read to them get a head start on language skills and literacy, as well as lovely cuddle time with Mom or Dad. But many children miss out on that experience, with one-third of children starting kindergarten without the language skills they need to learn to read.

So the nation's pediatricians are upping the ante, asking parents to start reading to their children when they're babies.

And pediatricians are becoming book purveyors, handing out books to families who might not have the resources to buy them.

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The Two-Way
11:24 am
Tue June 24, 2014

FBI Says It Freed 168 U.S. Children In Sex-Trafficking Raids

The authorities rounded up 281 pimps and freed 168 juveniles last week, targeting child sex-trafficking operations in more than 100 U.S. cities. Police arrested 21 pimps in Phoenix, the most of any FBI division. Other hotspots in the coordinated raids were centered in Denver, Cleveland, and Los Angeles.

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