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Interviews
8:48 am
Fri November 8, 2013

A Daughter Remembers Her 'Entertainer' Father

Courtesy of Margaret Talbot

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 10:45 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Nov. 21, 2012.

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It's All Politics
7:09 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Friday Political Mix: Obama, CBS Apologize; Rand Paul Copied

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 11:01 am

Good morning.

This was a week that gave Virginia a new governor, New Jersey the same one for another term, and ended with some big apologies.

Let's go to the "I'm sorry" roll first, starting with the biggie.

Obama's Sorry About All That

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All Tech Considered
7:02 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Lost Luggage? Airlines Have Got A Brand New (Electronic) Tag

Lost luggage can be one of the inconveniences of travel.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 2:29 pm

With holiday travel right around the corner, many Americans will have to decide whether to carry on or to check their baggage. Each decision comes with its own hassles.

By 2014, airlines are hoping to make you sweat less when you decide to check your bags. They will introduce an electronic tag system that allows you to track your suitcase's exact location on your smartphone during your travels.

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Parallels
7:01 am
Fri November 8, 2013

In Pakistan, It's Not Just Soldiers With PTSD

A boy stands at the site of a suspected U.S. drone attack in northwest Pakistan in 2008. Drone attacks and fighting in the region have resulted in post-traumatic stress disorder for many civilians, but few receive treatment.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 1:38 pm

Noor Khan traveled more than three hours through treacherous mountain roads from his remote village of Bajaur to the city of Peshawar in northwestern Pakistan. He makes the journey every few months in an effort to quiet the whirring he hears in his head.

The 27-year-old farmer has family and neighbors among the estimated 49,000 Pakistanis killed in conflict since 2001, when the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan first began to seep across the porous border.

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The Two-Way
6:39 am
Fri November 8, 2013

More Jobs Than Expected Added, But Jobless Rate Rose In Oct.

Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:12 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's John Ydstie previews the October jobs report

There were 204,000 jobs added to payrolls in October, about 80,000 more than economists expected. But the jobless rate edged up to 7.3 percent from 7.2 percent the month before, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday.

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Parallels
6:15 am
Fri November 8, 2013

World Headlines: France Has Its Credit Rating Downgraded

French President Francois Hollande speaks to the media at the World Bank Paris Office in Paris on Friday.
Michel Euler/Pool EPA /LANDOV

France, Le Monde

Standard and Poor's has lowered France's credit rating one notch from AA-plus to AA, citing the country's limited ability to get its public finances in order.

French officials called the downgrade unfair. Prime Minister, Jean-Marc Ayrault said France's rating remained one of the best in the world while Economy Minister Pierre Moscovici said the country's rating was among the top six in the EU.

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The Two-Way
5:53 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Strongest Cyclone Ever? Typhoon Haiyan Slams Philippines

From space, Typhoon Haiyan was almost beautiful. On the ground, it wasn't so pretty.
EUMETSAT

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 7:08 pm

(Click here for our latest update.)

Meteorologists weren't holding back Friday after watching in amazement as Typhoon Haiyan roared over the Philippines with pounding rain and top sustained winds approaching 200 mph as it neared the coast.

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Around the Nation
5:25 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Joe Biden Congratulates Wrong Marty Walsh

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:17 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. After Marty Walsh was elected mayor of Boston on Tuesday, Vice President Joe Biden called him up with hearty congratulations: You son of a gun, Marty. You did it. Except this Marty Walsh hadn't. The real mayor-elect was celebrating at a fancy hotel. This Marty Walsh was sitting on the couch watching TV with his wife.

Around the Nation
5:18 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Rutgers Course To Explore Springsteen's Biblical References

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

For many fans, listening to Bruce Springsteen can be spiritual, that certainly includes a religion professor at Rutgers University. He's introduced a one credit course exploring religious references in The Boss's songwriting. The professor says it's important to understand the broader context of a writer's work. Some of the Biblical references in the music he says are subtle, others not.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, JESUS WAS AN ONLY SON)

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN: (Singing) Well, Jesus was an only son.

The Two-Way
4:55 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Hopes Rising For 'First Step' At Nuclear Talks With Iran

Negotiators at their round table in Geneva, where talks are being held about Iran's nuclear ambitions.
Denis Balibouse Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:22 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Geneva

(Click here to jump to updates.)

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Around the Nation
3:10 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Should TSA Agents Have Broader Law Enforcement Powers?

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:17 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Airports around the country will hold a moment of silence this morning to honor Gerardo Hernandez. He was the TSA officer killed a week ago today at Los Angeles International Airport. That shooting is renewing debate over airport security and the role of the TSA. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports.

KIRK SIEGLER, BYLINE: Security at major airports is a web of moving parts, and a tangle of bureaucracies and jurisdictions.

(SOUNDBITE OF CAR HORN HONKING)

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Television
3:08 am
Fri November 8, 2013

2 Finalists Vie To Be 'Master Chef Junior'

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Tonight, a big moment for a couple of extraordinary chefs. They were originally 24 but after unimaginable cooking challenges, devastating eliminations, and, yes, some tears, the field is down to two. We're talking about the reality cooking show "Master Chef Junior." These contestants were ages eight to 13. Some stood on crates to reach their cooking stations? The two finalists: 12 year old Dara Yu and 13 year old Alexander Weiss. We spoke to them, along with one of the celebrity judges, Joe Bastianich.

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Politics
2:47 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Outside Money Plays Big Role In Va. Race For Governor

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Two of the big winners in Virginia's elections this week were not on the ballot. They actually aren't even Virginians. They are two men who spent more than $2 million each to help elect Democrat Terry McAuliffe as governor.

NPR's Peter Overby reports on the Election Day impact of San Francisco environmentalist Tom Steyer and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

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Shots - Health News
1:06 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Persistence Pays Off For Uninsured Alaskan

Hairdresser Lara Imler used to be an accountant. She doesn't miss her old job, except for the insurance.
Annie Feidt

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:17 am

Despite all the problems with HealthCare.gov, a few dozen Alaskans have managed to enroll in a health plan through the marketplace. Lara Imler is one of them.

Imler, a 37-year-old hair stylist in Anchorage, ditched her office job as an accountant in 2004. She says she loves making people feel better about themselves and is a lot happier cutting hair than she was sitting in front of a computer. But she does miss one big thing about her old job: "I had health insurance, and it was wonderful."

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StoryCorps
1:05 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Sisterly Love: 'I Knew That We Had Each Other'

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:56 am

Ten days after a court verdict found a man guilty of sexual assault, two of his victims — his 14- and 15-year-old nieces — stepped into a StoryCorps booth.

"He was a police officer," the older sister said. "This big SWAT man with all the badges and the uniforms, and he couldn't keep his hands to himself. He sexually assaulted me when no one was around. I felt like I was on pause my whole childhood. A prisoner — dead. And I didn't say a word to anybody for seven years."

Audio produced for Morning Edition by Katie Simon with Jud Esty-Kendall.

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All Tech Considered
1:04 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Third-Graders React To Video Games Tracking Their Play

Ms. James' class at St. Patrick's Episcopal Day School in Washington, D.C. wrote in to Morning Edition with their reactions to a story.
Courtesy of Mary Beth James

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:17 am

Last week, as part of our kids and technology theme week, Steve Henn wrote about how video game makers are spending more time and money tracking players' behavior.

"As we play games, game designers are running tests on us and our kids. They're asking themselves what can they tweak to make us play just a bit longer," Henn wrote.

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Architecture
1:03 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Size Does Matter, At Least In The Tallest Building Debate

The view from the Willis Tower, formerly known as Sears Tower, in Chicago.
FleishmanHillard

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 12:20 pm

There's a question that's looming over the new skyscraper at the World Trade Center site in New York: Should it count as the tallest building in the country?

The developers say yes. But by some measures, the Willis Tower in Chicago — formerly known as Sears Tower — can still lay claim to the title.

Now, an obscure organization known as the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat is preparing to settle the debate.

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Around the Nation
5:13 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

School Named For Former KKK Leader Reconsiders Its Legacy

Nathan Bedford Forrest served as the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. The high school that bears his name, now majority African-American, has been at the center of controversy for decades.
Mike Wintroath AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 6:41 pm

Duval County Public Schools is considering a name change for Nathan Bedford Forrest High School in Jacksonville, Fla. The school is named for a Confederate hero who was the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan — and after five decades of debate, there appears to be momentum for change.

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Politics
4:13 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

How Kennedy's Assassination Changed The Secret Service

The limousine carrying President John F. Kennedy races toward the hospital after he was shot in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, with Secret Service agent Clint Hill riding on the back.
Justin Newman AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 8:45 am

Nov. 22 will mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, a moment that left an indelible mark on those who remember it.

It also permanently changed the agency charged with protecting the president — the U.S. Secret Service.

Looking back at the images of Kennedy, first lady Jackie Kennedy, Texas Gov. John Connally and his wife waving as they rode through the streets of Dallas in an open Lincoln, it all looks terribly innocent and naive.

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Code Switch
4:13 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Striking Harmonies With The Jubilee Singers' Past And Present

Soprano Nigia Hunt is a junior at Durham School of the Arts. She and others are singing for Paul Kwami, auditioning for a solo in the Duke Performances concert.
Leoneda Inge/NPR

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:51 pm

The Fisk Jubilee Singers are known worldwide for their flawless voices and stellar performances of Negro spirituals. They're from Fisk University in Nashville, Tenn., but they travel around the world to perform their music. Negro spirituals were originally sung by slaves and remain tightly linked to African-American culture. Paul Kwami, the choir's musical director, said singing these spirituals was a way for slaves to lament their servitude, along with the hope of being free one day.

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Around the Nation
4:13 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Trim Recess? Some Schools Hold On To Child's Play

Students play tag at Ruby Bridges Elementary in Alameda, Calif. The school has expanded recess time with help from the nonprofit group Playworks.
Eric Westervelt NPR

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:51 pm

It's recess time at Ruby Bridges Elementary School and a third-grader is pummeling a plastic tetherball with focused intensity. He's playing at one of more than a half-dozen recess play stations on the school's sprawling cement playground — there's also wall ball, basketball, capture the flag, sharks and minnows, a jungle gym and tag.

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The Salt
4:12 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

How 17th Century Fraud Gave Rise To Bright Orange Cheese

Shelburne Farms' clothbound cheddar has a bright yellow color because it's made from the milk of cows that graze on grasses high in beta-carotene.
Courtesy of A. Blake Gardner

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 7:46 am

The news from Kraft last week that the company is ditching two artificial dyes in some versions of its macaroni and cheese products left me with a question.

Why did we start coloring cheeses orange to begin with? Turns out there's a curious history here.

In theory, cheese should be whitish — similar to the color of milk, right?

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It's All Politics
3:57 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

AFL-CIO Lets GOP Speak For Itself In New Immigration Ads

Rep. Paul Broun, R-Ga., announces his plans to run for the U.S. Senate in February. A new AFL-CIO ad features a comment made by Broun regarding illegal immigrants.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:07 pm

The nation's biggest labor group is taking its support for an immigration overhaul to the TV airwaves, with Spanish-language ads that hammer Republican House members.

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Shots - Health News
3:44 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Doctors Slow To Embrace Recommended HPV Testing

The human papilloma virus causes most cervical cancers. That's why HPV testing is now recommended for women ages 30 to 65.
Science Photo Library

For decades the annual Pap test was women's chief protection against cervical cancer. That all changed when a test for human papillomavirus, the cause of most cervical cancer, was approved in 2003.

With the HPV test, women don't need to get Pap tests as often. But that message hasn't gotten through to many doctors.

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All Tech Considered
3:21 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Facebook Takes On Cyberbullies As More Teens Leave Site

On Wednesday, Facebook released a digital resource center to expand its efforts against online harassment.
Facebook

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:18 pm

Facebook has rolled out a tool to address online harassment that some digital safety advocates are calling a beneficial, but belated, first step.

The social networking site with 1.2 billion users worldwide released a "bullying prevention hub" this week. It's essentially an online resource center with suggestions for teens, parents and educators on how to address bullying — both online and off — and take action on Facebook.

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It's All Politics
2:51 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

All In The Family: Jimmy Carter's Grandson Runs For Governor

Former President Jimmy Carter and his grandson, Georgia state Sen. Jason Carter, watch a baseball game between the Atlanta Braves and Philadelphia Phillies in Atlanta on Aug. 14.
John Bazemore AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 3:29 pm

Jimmy Carter's grandson is running for Carter's old job — governor of Georgia.

Democratic state Sen. Jason Carter formally announced Thursday he will challenge Republican Gov. Nathan Deal, joining a long list of relatives of famous politicians on ballots in 2014.

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Around the Nation
2:32 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Here, Drink A Nice Glass Of Sparkling Clear Wastewater

One man's sewage is another man's drinking water. As wastewater comes through this pipe, straw-like filters get rid of any contaminants wider than a human hair. That's just one step of the purification process.
Amy Standen KQED

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:51 pm

In California's Silicon Valley, there will soon be a new source of water for residents. That may not sound like big news, but the source of this water – while certainly high-tech — is raising some eyebrows.

With freshwater becoming more scarce in many parts of the country, the public may have to overcome its aversion to water recycling.

Ah, The Stench Of Drinking Water

If text could transmit odor, you'd know where this water is coming from.

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Photography
2:32 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Photographer Editta Sherman, 'Duchess Of Carnegie Hall,' Dies At 101

Sherman poses for a photo in New York in July 2012.
Verena Dobnik AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 6:16 pm

For six decades, in her light-filled studio on top of New York's Carnegie Hall, portrait photographer Editta Sherman photographed celebrities from Leonard Bernstein to Yul Brynner to Joe DiMaggio. She was a legend — and she'd tell you that herself. Sherman died Friday at 101.

A note on her website reads: "Editta Sherman's vibrant sparkling life faded from this earth on November 1st, All Saints Day. She is at peace now and she is clothed in her ballerina dress with her diamond shoes dancing her way home to our hearts."

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National Security
2:32 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

When It Comes To Public Opinion, More News Is Not Good News For NSA

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:51 pm

New public opinion polls show distaste for National Security Agency surveillance does not break cleanly across party lines. Despite the administration's attempts otherwise, one new study finds that the more people know about the NSA, the more they dislike it.

Technology
2:32 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Twitter Goes Public And Its Stock Price Soars

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:51 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish, this week at NPR West in California.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block in Washington, D.C.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL RINGING)

BLOCK: Ringing the bell to open trading on the New York Stock Exchange today, @SirPatStew, @vivienneharr and @CherylFiandaca - all of them big users of Twitter - to mark the day the social networking site became a publicly traded company.

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