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Shots - Health News
1:08 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Why Younger Women Could Benefit From Mammograms After All

Mammography detects cancer, but debate rages over when and how often women should get screened.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 3:10 pm

Women should get screened for breast cancer in their 40s, a study concludes, because they face a greater risk of death when cancers aren't found early.

Women who were diagnosed with cancer in their 40s and died of the disease were more likely to have never had a mammogram than were older women, according to the study.

Seventy percent of the women diagnosed with cancer in their 40s who later died hadn't had a mammogram, compared to 50 percent of women in their 60s. Half of the cancer deaths in the study were in women who had been diagnosed before age 50.

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Planet Money
1:08 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

The Most (And Least) Lucrative College Majors, In 1 Graph

Matt Stiles NPR

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 11:59 pm

Erin Ford graduated from the University of Texas two years ago with a bachelor's degree in petroleum engineering. Recruiters came to campus to woo her. She got a paid summer internship, which turned into a full-time job after she graduated. Now, at age 24, she makes $110,000 a year.

Michael Gardner just graduated from City College in New York with a degree in psychology. He applied for more than 100 jobs, had trouble getting interviews and worked at Home Depot to make ends meet.

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Parallels
12:42 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

In The Arab World, Unrest Is Coupled With Unemployment

Tunisians are silhouetted Jan. 13 behind a poster of those who died in the revolution that overthrew an authoritarian president and started the Arab Spring. More than two years after the revolution, Tunisia is struggling with high unemployment and rising violence in its politics.
Amine Landoulsi AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 4:54 pm

The Syria conflict was initially part of a wave of uprisings in 2011 known as the Arab Spring, which began in part as a cry for political freedom and more economic opportunity. Fast-forward to today, when unemployment in some of these countries is among the highest in the world.

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All Tech Considered
12:26 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Net Neutrality In Court: Here's What You Need To Know

The future of the Internet is at stake in a case before a D.C. court.
Hoang Dinh Nam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 1:27 pm

The beauty of the Internet — and the reason for its ubiquitous place in our lives — is that just about anyone can use it to offer services, products or information. But the link between what's out there on the Internet, how fast it gets to us and how much data can get to us is dependent on Internet service providers and the rules that govern them. That's where things get thorny for the principle of net neutrality.

If your eyes are already glazing over, consider this: This debate could affect the speed, quality and cost of your Hulu or Netflix binge-viewing.

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The Salt
12:17 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Burger King French Fry Burger

The Burger King Fry Burger.
NPR

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 2:03 pm

The Burger King doesn't stay king by resting on his laurels. No, he stays king by constantly innovating (and by executing dissenters). New on the menu is the French Fry Burger, which is, you may have guessed, a burger topped with french fries. It costs $1, which should be considered a value and a red flag.

Peter: Since they're exactly $1 each, they can legally be used as currency.

Ian: And you can use actual dollars as napkins!

Mike: Dollar Menu is fast-food shorthand for "Day Old."

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The Two-Way
11:53 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Craft Beer's Success Makes Sam Adams Founder A Billionaire

Founder and Chairman of the Boston Beer Co. Jim Koch has seen shares of his company rise from $20 in 2009 to a record $227 Monday.
Isaac Brekken Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 1:38 pm

These are good times for craft beers — and not just for people who like to drink them, but for those who make them. As an example, look to the brewer of Sam Adams. Boston Beer Co.'s soaring stock price has made its founder, Jim Koch, into a billionaire, Bloomberg News reports.

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Author Interviews
11:41 am
Mon September 9, 2013

For Novelist Jonathan Lethem, Radicalism Runs In The Family

Jonathan Lethem's other books include The Ecstasy of Influence, Chronic City and Girl in Landscape.
John Lucas Courtesy Doubleday

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 1:01 pm

People who don't believe in God but have an almost religious belief in causes are at the center of Jonathan Lethem's new novel, Dissident Gardens. The novel opens in 1955 Queens, N.Y., when Rose Zimmer, a secular Jew and Communist, is expelled from the party, ostensibly because the local committee disapproves of her affair with a black police officer.

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Parallels
11:38 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Zubin Mehta's Concert Strikes A Discordant Note In Kashmir

Zubin Mehta conducts the Bavarian State Orchestra in Srinagar, India, on Saturday night. The heavy security surrounding the event was an affront to many citizens of the state, which has chafed under heavy police presence for the better part of two decades.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 2:58 pm

In Kashmir, the Shalimar Gardens of Srinagar, a relic of Mughal-era emperors, has been restored to its imperial tranquility with murmuring fountains, shallow pools and manicured beauty.

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The Two-Way
11:03 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Kerry Says Syria Action Would Be 'Unbelievably Small'

Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a news conference Monday in London.
Susan Walsh AFP/Getty Images

As he sought to make the case Monday that the U.S. needs to strike Syria, but won't be going to war as it did in Afghanistan and Iraq, Secretary of State John Kerry said this:

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Music Reviews
10:20 am
Mon September 9, 2013

When Duke Flirted With The Queen

Duke Ellington, looking dapper in 1958.
Evening Standard Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 7:35 am

In 1958, at an arts festival in Yorkshire, Duke Ellington was presented to Queen Elizabeth II. They tied up the reception line for a few minutes, exchanging royal pleasantries; our Duke politely flirted with Her Majesty. Soon afterward, maybe that very night, Ellington outlined the movements of The Queen's Suite. He recorded it with his orchestra the following year, sent it to Her Majesty, and declined to release it to the public in his lifetime. It's not clear whether Queen Elizabeth has listened to it.

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Sports
9:54 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Monday Night Marked By Redskins Name Debate

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 11:19 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to spend a few minutes today talking about the power of words and labels. In a few minutes, we'll meet a person whose irritation with too many of the images he was seeing about Asian-Americans sparked what's become one of the most influential blogs about Asian-Americans. We're talking with the creator of the Angry Asian Man, Phil Yu.

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World
9:54 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Unemployment: Arab Spring Not Springing Back

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 11:19 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. You might be ready for some football but many Native Americans say they are already tired of hearing team names they consider racial slurs. We'll hear what the Oneida Indian Nation is trying to do about one of those team names. That's coming up later in the program.

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The Two-Way
9:53 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Luxury Retailer Neiman Marcus Sells For $6 Billion

The Chicago skyline is reflected in the exterior of Neiman Marcus on Michigan Avenue in Chicago in a file photo from 2009. The luxury retailer sold for six billion dollars on Monday.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 1:32 pm

Two large investors — Ares Management LLC and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board — have reached a deal to purchase Neiman Marcus for $6 billion, the companies said Monday. The two buyers will hold equal shares of Neiman, which is based in Dallas.

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Parallels
9:49 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Who Are The Syrian Rebels?

A rebel fighter inspects purchases made by civilians as they cross through a building near the front lines in Aleppo, in northern Syria, on Monday. The city has been divided for more than a year, with the rebels holding the eastern part and government troops holding the west.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 11:46 am

When it comes to Syria's rebels, the conventional wisdom in Washington has been that there are countless factions with a range of agendas and it's difficult, if not impossible, to know exactly who they are.

But ask researchers who've spent two years digging into social media and YouTube videos and they offer a remarkably detailed picture of rebel brigades, their ideologies and their arsenal of weapons in the fight against President Bashar Assad's regime.

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The Two-Way
9:26 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Found At Sea: 30 Tons Of Hashish, On Fire

An aerial image shows the Gold Star cargo ship ablaze. Officials say the ship's crew set fire to 30 tons of hashish after authorities approached the vessel for inspection.
Guardia di Finanza

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 10:21 am

A fire aboard a cargo ship in the Mediterranean Sea was set in order to get rid of 30 tons of hashish, according to officials in Italy and Malta. Authorities had approached the Gold Star, a Tanzania-registered ship, for an inspection Friday afternoon. But members of the crew reportedly set fire to their cargo, which Italian authorities identified as hashish resin.

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The Two-Way
9:25 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Talk Turns To Getting Assad To Give Up His Chemical Weapons

Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-Moualem (left) and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov in Moscow on Monday.
Yuri Kadobnov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 12:53 pm

(1:45 p.m. ET: Since our original headline — "Russia Urges Assad To Cede Control Of His Chemical Weapons" — we've updated this post several times.)

Saying he hopes to "receive [a] fast and positive answer," Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Monday that Russia believes a U.S. military strike on Syria can be averted if President Bashar Assad hands over control of his regime's chemical weapons to international monitors.

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Code Switch
8:46 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Are You Ready For Some Controversy? The History Of 'Redskin'

A Washington Redskins fan watches from the sidelines during the first half of an NFL preseason football game this August.
Nick Wass AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:38 pm

Monday Night Football kicks off this evening with the Washington Redskins facing off against the Philadelphia Eagles at FedEx Field. As the Redskins start a new season, they are once again in the center of a national debate about their name.

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The Two-Way
8:12 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Downing St. Denies 'Dozy' David Cameron Left Secrets Unguarded

The prime minister's "red box," looking rather lonely, on a train Saturday from London to York. The Mirror made it front page news.
The Mirror

Since he's already got a reputation for absent-mindedness because last year he left his 8-year-old daughter behind at a pub, it's easy to see why Britain's Mirror is jumping on a claim that a "dozy" British Prime Minister David Cameron left the "red box" in which he carries official papers unguarded for a while Saturday whi

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The Two-Way
7:44 am
Mon September 9, 2013

How Does A 107-Year-Old Die In A Police Shootout? Details Emerge

This house in Pine Bluff, Ark., was the scene of a shootout Saturday evening, as Monroe Isadore, 107, held off police for hours before being killed. He had been approached about moving out, a roommate says.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 1:20 pm

Monroe Isadore, the 107-year-old man who died in a shootout with a SWAT team Saturday in Arkansas, had been asked to move out of the house he was living in and into an apartment. That detail comes from Isadore's roommate, who says the centenarian was very angry.

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The Two-Way
6:31 am
Mon September 9, 2013

'New' Van Gogh Painting Identified; Was In A Norwegian Attic

Alex Ruger, director of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, at the unveiling Monday of Vincent Van Gogh's Sunset at Montmajour.
Olaf Kraak AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 9:15 am

A painting that had earlier been thought to be a fake and had been stored for decades in the attic of a Norwegian home has now been identified as a long-lost work by Vincent Van Gogh.

Sunset at Montmajour has been authenticated thanks to "extensive research into [its] style, technique, paint, canvas, the depiction, Van Gogh's letters and the provenance," Van Gogh Museum Director Axel Ruger says in a statement posted Monday by the Amsterdam museum.

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The Two-Way
5:51 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Strike On Syria: Meaningless Gesture Or Necessary Response?

Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., called military action in Syria legitimate and necessary.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 9:09 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power
  • From 'Morning Edition': Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla.
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Tom Bowman

The arguments for and against taking military action against the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad for its alleged use of chemical weapons against civilians were laid out Monday on Morning Edition.

Making the case for a "legitimate, necessary and proportional response" was Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.

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Shots - Health News
5:25 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Humanitarian Aid Agencies Brace For Fallout From Syrian Strikes

At the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, many families struggle to get clean water, food and health services.
Jeff J Mitchell Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 9:04 am

The World Health Organization says the Syrian civil war is currently the worst ongoing humanitarian crisis on earth.

Aid groups have been scrambling to provide shelter, food, water and health care to the huge numbers of people who've been uprooted by the fighting. The big question now is whether U.S. military action could spark another wave of refugees and make the situation worse.

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Europe
5:25 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Tourists Flock To Downton, England

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Two-Way
5:18 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Book News: Why Batwoman Can't Get Married

In this illustration released by DC Comics, Batwoman is shown as a 5-foot-10 superhero with flowing red hair, knee-high red boots with spiked heels, and a form-fitting black outfit.
AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
4:51 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Sailor Proposes To Girlfriend Among Flash Mob Dancers

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to Michael Turner. He's a sailor on a guided missile destroyer. He wanted to propose to Jamie Story before he was deployed, so he invited her to dinner in Virginia Beach. And according to the Virginian-Pilot, that's when the flash mob appeared. Mr. Turner arranged for 50 dancers to do synchronized steps on the street as he proposed. Luckily, she said yes, 'cause otherwise it would have been awkward.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
2:57 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Concert Stirs Strife In Disputed Kashmir Region

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The New York City Opera may be forced to cancel the rest of its current season and all of its next season, if it is not able to raise $20 million by the end of the year. It has been known as the People's Opera since it debuted 70 years ago. Its mission: Making opera more accessible and affordable. City Opera, as it's called, has experienced what it calls a cash crisis for some years. And now, it's started a Kickstarter campaign to raise the money it needs to survive.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:57 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Congress Returns Facing Work Besides Syria Resolution

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, when Representative Cole and his colleagues return to Capitol Hill today, they will hear about Syria from administration officials.

NPR congressional correspondent Tamara Keith reports.

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NPR Story
2:57 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Rep. Cole Weighs In On Syria Resolution

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 5:25 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Seeking to win support in Congress for air strikes on Syria, President Obama addresses the nation tomorrow and also gives a series of TV interviews today. Syrian president Bashar al-Assad is also going to America's airwaves. Asked on CBS if a strike on his country could provoke a retaliation involving chemical weapons, this was his response.

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Around the Nation
1:31 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Trail Life USA, The 'Other' Boy Scouts Of America

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 10:49 am

A new faith-based group for boys is taking shape, just three months after the Boy Scouts of America decided to change its membership policy to allow gay youth to join.

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All Tech Considered
1:30 am
Mon September 9, 2013

It's OK To Protest In China, Just Don't March

Security guards stand outside newspaper offices in Guangdong province in January, where banners and flowers were laid in protest of censorship.
AP

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 11:12 am

Thousands of messages posted on the Internet every day in China get censored. Until now, little has been known about how the Chinese censorship machine works — except that it is comprehensive.

"It probably is the largest effort ever to selectively censor human expression," says Harvard University social scientist Gary King. "They don't censor everything. There are millions of Chinese [who] talk about millions of things. But the effort to prune the Internet of certain kinds of information is unprecedented."

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