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NPR Story
2:43 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Many In Washington Were Surprised By Obama's Syria Decision

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:47 am

President Obama on Saturday announced that he would wait on military action against Syria until members of Congress could vote on the resolution. Congress still has a week to go before its recess ends and lawmakers can discuss the matter.

NPR Story
2:43 am
Mon September 2, 2013

U.S. Delay On Strikes Prolongs Tension For Syrians

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:40 am

President Obama announced over the weekend that he will seek authorization from Congress for strikes against Syria over its reported use of chemical weapons. For an update on the situation in Syria, Steve Inskeep talks to Sam Dagher, the Middle East correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, in Damascus.

NPR Story
2:43 am
Mon September 2, 2013

One Direction Heats Up Labor Day Box Office

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 11:40 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: boy band. Because what's better than one teenage heartthrob? Five of them. In 3-D.

The Irish-English pop group One Direction helped Hollywood break a Labor Day weekend record. Their 3-D concert film "One Direction: This is Us" grossed $17 million in its first three days to top the weekend box office. That's a nice take for the Morgan Spurlock music documentary, which cost a modest $10 million to make.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US")

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Politics
1:31 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Syria Resolution Could Be A Hard Sell On Capitol Hill

From left, Rep. Sander Levin, D-Mich., Rep. Robert Scott, D-Va., and Rep. Brad Schneider, D- ll., walk to a closed members-only briefing on Syria on Sunday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:41 pm

Twenty-four hours after President Obama announced on Saturday that he'll wait for congressional authorization before launching strikes on Syria; members of Congress attended a classified briefing at the Capitol.

For days, most of the discontent among members of Congress has been about not being included in the deliberations on Syria, about not getting the chance to vote. Now that they've gotten their way, each member of Congress will have to go on the record.

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Crime In The City
1:26 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Hardcore With A Heart: Joburg Thrillers Star A Spunky P.I.

Jassy Mackenzie was born in Rhodesia and moved to South Africa when she was eight years old. She edits and writes for the annual publication Best of South Africa.
Soho Crime

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 3:54 pm

South Africa's commercial capital, Johannesburg, is a mixture of the old Wild West and a complex, modern African hub — at least, that's how crime novelist Jassy Mackenzie describes it. Mackenzie was born across the border, in Zimbabwe, but she moved to Johannesburg — Joburg for short — as a child, and she's a passionate champion of the city.

"I love the energy of Johannesburg," Mackenzie says. "People are open. People communicate. People are friendly in a brash, big-city way, which I love. ... [it's] the New York of South Africa!"

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Shots - Health News
1:24 am
Mon September 2, 2013

To Keep Polio At Bay, Israel Revaccinates A Million Kids

In early August, Israel launched a mass campaign to vaccinate children against polio, including this little girl at a clinic in Rahat.
David Buimovitch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 8:10 am

Israel is in the midst of a massive, emergency immunization drive of all children under the age of 9 against polio.

Why?

Health workers detected the virus in southern Israel in February. Since then, they've found it in 85 different sewage samples across the country, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative said Wednesday. Yet so far, no children have gotten sick or been paralyzed by the virus.

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U.S.
1:23 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Cincinnati's Airport: Best In The U.S.?

A passenger rides an escalator to Terminal A at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in Erlanger, Ky.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 2:45 am

In the grand days of railroad travel, passengers arrived in monumental terminals. There was grandeur, style and comfort — qualities that today's equivalent for long-distance travel, the airport, mostly lack. Especially in the United States.

In a survey of international travelers by the British firm Skytrax, not a single U.S. airport ranked anywhere near the top of the list. Singapore got top honors, while the best the United States could do was Cincinnati's airport — which came in at No. 30.

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Planet Money
1:21 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Ecuador To World: Pay Up To Save The Rainforest. World To Ecuador: Meh.

An aerial view of the Yasuni National Park, in Ecuador's northeastern jungle.
Dolores Ochoa AP

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 5:04 pm

The government of Ecuador has abandoned a plan that would have kept part of the Amazonian rainforest off limits to oil drilling. The initiative was an unusual one: Ecuador was promising to keep the oil in the ground, but it wanted to be paid for doing so.

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Business
1:20 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Trucker Shortage Worsens As Energy Sector Booms

Keith Ceynar transfers oil from his truck into a tank at a facility outside Alexander, N.D. An increasing amount of oil is being delivered by trucks.
Matthew Staver Landov

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 2:45 am

When goods arrive in Houston, they may come in containers stacked high on huge ships or strung out on long lines of rail cars. But to get to the customer, those goods need to be put on trucks and driven to their final destinations.

And now with the oil and gas sectors booming, the demand for truckers is soaring. The U.S. Energy Information Administration says oil delivered to refineries by trucks shot up 38 percent between 2011 and 2012.

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History
4:18 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

Declassified Documents Reveal CIA Role In 1953 Iranian Coup

Former Iranian Premier Mohammed Mossadegh appears in October 1951. The CIA's overthrow of Mossadegh was a template for the agency's covert operations going forward.
AP

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 4:44 pm

The Central Intelligence Agency was behind the overthrow of Iranian Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh in 1953. It's been an open secret for decades, but last week, The George Washington University's National Security Archive released newly declassified documents proving it.

Orchestrating the Iranian coup d'état was a first for the CIA and would serve as the template for future Cold War covert operations worldwide.

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Business
3:41 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

When Stress Takes Over, Employee Burnout Can Set In

Pushing workers only goes so far, says one long-time human resources manager.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 5:16 pm

As Labor Day honors American workers, stress weighs on many. A changing world — and therefore a changing workplace — has many employees on the job and staring at screens for hours upon hours. Some have reached a breaking point.

John Challenger, CEO of workplace consulting company Challenger, Gray & Christmas, diagnoses burnout. He tells NPR's Jacki Lyden stress can manifest emotionally, mentally or physically. "It can be combined with doubts about your confidence or the value of the work you do," he says.

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Religion
3:04 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

Cowboy Church: With Rodeo Arena, They 'Do Church Different'

A Western motif greets visitors to the Cowboy Church of Ellis County, in Waxahachie, Texas. About 1,700 people attend the church on Sundays.
Matt Slocum AP

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 6:36 pm

It's Sunday morning at the Cowboy Church of Santa Fe County, N.M. You know you're there because of the chuck wagon parked by the highway.

You couldn't find a more nonreligious-looking building. The church is a charmless metal warehouse on a concrete slab. Inside, the altar is decorated like a set from a 1950s western — complete with saddles, hats, boots, a lasso and wagon wheel.

The band has just kicked off with "I Think God Must Be a Cowboy at Heart," and about 30 people in folding chairs are tapping their feet.

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Music Interviews
3:04 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

Kathleen Hanna On Working Through Illness And Focusing Anger

Kathleen Hanna (center) is the frontwoman of The Julie Ruin. The band's debut album is titled Run Fast.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 4:18 pm

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Television
3:04 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

'Cold Justice' Is Coming To A Small Town (And TV) Near You

In her 21 years as a prosecutor, Kelly Siegler successfully tried 68 murder cases.
John Nowak

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 4:18 pm

Television has served up sass and brass with its female crime solvers for decades: Angie Dickenson in Police Woman, in the 1970s, Cagney and Lacey in the 80s, and the modern duo Rizzoli and Isles on TNT.

This fall, that network has decided to forget the script. It has two more sleuths who've already cracked thousands of real crime scenes and racked up dozens of victories in court.

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The Two-Way
2:17 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

Egypt Charges Former President Mohammed Morsi, Others

Mohammed Morsi in January of this year. He's been in custody since his ouster in July.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Egypt's top prosecutor has referred ousted President Mohammed Morsi to trial on charges of inciting deadly violence against his opponents.

State television said Sunday that Morsi, senior Muslim Brotherhood leader Essam el-Erian, former presidential aides and advisors Assad Sheikha and Ahmed Abdel-Ati were among those charged in connection with clashes Dec. 5, 2012 at the presidential palace.

In all, 14 individuals have been referred to a Cairo criminal court, according to Sky News.

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Parallels
1:03 pm
Sun September 1, 2013

Anxiety, Relief, Confusion Build Whirlwind In Damascus

Shoppers form a line at a bakery in Damascus, Syria, on Friday. Ahead of President Obama's speech Saturday, the price for a bag of pita bread shot up amid speculation of a U.S. military strike.
Kyodo /Landov

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 5:56 pm

The author is a Syrian citizen in Damascus who is not being further identified for safety reasons.

It has been a 24-hour emotional roller coaster in the Syrian capital, as Damascus first went abuzz with speculation ahead of President Obama's speech.

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The Two-Way
11:45 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Another Chinese Official Caught Up In Corruption Probe

Jiang Jiemin, left, is the latest Chinese official to come under scrutiny for possible corruption.
Kin Cheung Associated Press

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 5:52 pm

Another high-level corruption probe has begun in China even as the trial of former regional Chinese Communist Party boss Bo Xilai was apparently still underway.

Jiang Jiemin, the head of the commission that oversees state-owned companies, is suspected of a "serious violation of discipline" related to his top job at the China National Petroleum Corporation.

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The Two-Way
9:27 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Radioactive Water Leak At Fukushima Worse Than First Thought

This photo taken Aug. 6 shows local government officials and nuclear experts at Fukushima after contaminated water was discovered.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:48 am

Radiation surrounding Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant has increased 18-fold following a report last month that radioactive water had leaked into the ground around the plant, which was badly damaged in a 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

Tokyo Electric Power Co., which owns the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, reports that radiation around the site is at 1,800 millisieverts per hour, a level that Reuters says is "enough to kill an exposed person in four hours."

Previously, the utility, also known as Tepco, said the leaking water was at around 100 millisieverts per hour.

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The Two-Way
7:29 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Kerry: Tests Indicate Sarin Used In Syria

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry delivers a statement about the use of chemical weapons in Syria at the Department of State last week.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 2:46 pm

Secretary of State John Kerry says that tests have shown evidence of Syria's use of the chemical agent sarin in an attack on the opposition last month that the White House has blamed on the regime of President Bashar al-Assad.

"I can share with you today that blood and hair samples that have come to us through an appropriate chain of custody from East Damascus, from first responders, it has tested positive for signatures of sarin," Kerry told CNN on Sunday.

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Around the Nation
7:14 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Austin Lakefront Institution Closes Doors For Lack Of Water

Dockside at Carlos 'n Charlie's on Lake Travis.
Pete Clark

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:54 pm

Carlos 'n Charlie's restaurant on Lake Travis in Austin, Texas, will be having its last last call on Monday. But don't bother coming by boat.

The restaurant has been a lakeside hotspot since it opened in 1995. Back then, docking at the restaurant's wharf was a popular way to take in the party atmosphere, which part-owner Pete Clark describes as like "a cheap Spring break movie."

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Politics
7:14 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Congress Gets Its Say On Syria

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:54 pm

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

This morning, Secretary of State John Kerry said he has evidence that the Syrian regime used sarin gas. The evidence was found in blood and hair samples gathered by first responders, and is separate from that collected by U.N. inspectors. With us now to talk about the president's announcement yesterday is NPR's Congressional reporter, Ailsa Chang. Good morning, Ailsa.

AILSA CHANG, BYLINE: Good morning.

GOODWYN: OK. So, the president got the message. How loud have the cheers been from members of Congress?

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National Security
7:14 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Obama's Sudden Shift On Syria

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:54 pm

Transcript

WADE GOODWYN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Wade Goodwyn. Rachel Martin is away. Syrians and the world have spent the last week bracing for a U.S. attack on Damascus that seemed to be imminent. Now, President Obama has surprised everyone by pushing the pause button and by announcing yesterday in the Rose Garden that he will go to Congress for approval. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports from the White House.

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The Two-Way
6:42 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Syrian Media Declares 'Historic American Retreat'

Syrian refugees pass through the Turkish Cilvegozu gate border on Sunday.
Gregorio Borgia Associated Press

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 7:09 am

Syrian state media on Sunday reacted to President Obama's decision to ask Congress for authorization to strike President Bashar al-Assad's regime, calling the move the start of a U.S. retreat.

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All Tech Considered
6:17 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Out Of The Fields And Into Computer Science Classes

The inaugural class of the Computer Science and Information Technology program, scheduled to graduate in 2016.
Hartnell College

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:54 pm

To earn money for her family, Alicia Leon Rios worked in the fields in Salinas, Calif. Meanwhile, she sent her toddler, Leticia, to Mexico to be raised by her grandparents.

Even now, Alicia Leon Rios chokes up thinking about that difficult decision more than two decades ago. But it was worth it, she in Spanish, because her daughter "was able to choose another path."

That path led to college.

Fast-Track To A Degree

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Health
6:17 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Texas Megachurch At Center Of Measles Outbreak

The Eagle Mountain International Church in Newark, Texas, is linked to at least 21 cases of measles.
LM Otero AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:58 pm

Measles was declared eliminated in the U.S. more than a decade ago. But in recent years, the highly infectious disease has cropped up in communities with low vaccination rates, most recently in North Texas.

There, 21 people — the majority of whom have not been immunized — have gotten the disease, which began at a vaccine-skeptical megachurch.

The outbreak began when a man who contracted the virus on a recent trip to Indonesia visited the Eagle Mountain International Church in Newark, about an hour and a half northwest of Dallas.

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World
6:17 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Last Flight Of Ethiopia-To-Israel Jewish Migration Program

A boy waves the flag of his new homeland on the last flight of organized, large-scale emigration of Ethiopian Jews to Israel.
Moshik Brin Courtesy of Moshik Brin

Originally published on Sun September 8, 2013 1:54 pm

Last Wednesday, two jetliners flew 450 Ethiopian Jews to Israel.

They were the last to arrive under an official program designed to bring to Israel all remaining Ethiopian Jews who are eligible for citizenship.

At the Tel Aviv airport just before the planes landed, everyone seemed excited. Relatives of people arriving from Ethiopia cheered when the plane doors opened.

Achenef Chekole arrived with his wife, two sons and two daughters. Family and friends who had already immigrated to Israel greeted them with hugs.

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The Two-Way
6:16 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Ailing Mandela Is Sent Home In Critical Condition

Nelson Mandela photographed during a lunch to Benefit the Mandela Children's Foundation in April 2009 in Cape Town, South Africa.
Chris Jackson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 5:51 pm

Nelson Mandela, still in critical condition with a chronic lung infection, was discharged from a hospital Sunday and taken by ambulance to his home in Johannesburg after three months of intensive care. The former South African president and anti-apartheid leader is 95.

The news comes a day after mistaken reports that he had already been sent home from a Pretoria hospital.

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The Two-Way
5:44 am
Sun September 1, 2013

British Journalist And TV Personality Sir David Frost Dies At 74

Sir David Frost arrives at London's Downing Street in April 2009.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 5:20 pm

Veteran British journalist and broadcaster Sir David Frost has died from a suspected heart attack while aboard a luxury cruise ship. He was 74.

The Guardian and The Daily Mail both report that Frost was giving a speech aboard the Queen Elizabeth II, en route from Southampton to Lisbon, when he collapsed.

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Code Switch
3:46 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Asians-Only Volleyball Brings Community Together

Sam Li, 52 (center, lime green) has been playing 9-man volleyball for nearly 30 years and keeps up with the younger players.
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 9:23 am

Volleyball games are stopping traffic on one of Washington, D.C.'s landmark streets, Pennsylvania Avenue, this Labor Day weekend.

More than 1,000 players from across the U.S. and Canada have gathered in the nation's capital to bump, set and spike in an annual tournament with unusual rules.

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The Two-Way
3:10 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Mandela Is Released From The Hospital

A portrait of former South African President Nelson Mandela with get well messages Saturday outside the hospital where he was treated for a lung infection.
Themba Hadebe AP

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 12:22 pm

Former South African President Nelson Mandel was released from a hospital where he has been treated for a recurring lung infection since June 8.

His condition remains critical, but doctors feel he can still receive intensive care at home, the government said.

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