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The Two-Way
12:35 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

'Nothing Racist' Implied In 'Obama' Act, Says Rodeo Clown

A photo taken of the clown who wore a mask resembling President Obama during a rodeo Saturday at the Missouri State Fair.
Jameson Hsieh AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

Tuffy Gessling, the rodeo clown at the center of the controversy over the skit at the Missouri State Fair in which a man wearing a President Obama mask was mocked, says "nothing racist was ever implied."

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The Two-Way
12:18 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

In Moscow, American Runner Dedicates His Medal To Gay Friends

Nick Symmonds of the United States celebrates winning silver in the Men's 800 meters final during Day Four of the 14th IAAF World Athletics Championships Moscow 2013 at Luzhniki Stadium on Tuesday.
Mark Kolbe Getty Images

The two-time U.S. Olympian Nick Symmonds won the silver medal in the 800 meter race, yesterday, in the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Moscow.

That wasn't the news, however. Instead, the news became Symmonds' dedication of his medal to his gay and lesbian friends.

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Shots - Health News
12:00 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Violence Causes Doctors Without Borders To Exit Somalia

Somali women and children wait to get medicine in July 2008, from a clinic run by Doctors Without Borders about 20 miles south of Mogadishu.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:05 am

The aid group Doctors Without Borders said Wednesday that it's closing all operations in Somalia after 22 years because of the increase in violent attacks and abuse against its staff.

"This is the most difficult announcement that I've had to make as MSF president," Dr. Unni Karunakara said at a press conference from Kenya. "Respect for humanitarian principles no longer exists in Somalia today."

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Law
11:50 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Past Immigration Policies Had A Reverse Effect, Professor Says

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 12:20 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:20 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Jesse Jackson Jr. Sentenced To 30 Months In Prison

Former Illinois Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., leaves federal court in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday. Jackson was sentenced to two and a half years in prison Wednesday after pleading guilty to scheming to spend $750,000 in campaign funds on TV's, restaurant dinners, an expensive watch and other costly personal items.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 3:56 pm

Jesse Jackson Jr., who pleaded guilty to misusing $750,000 in campaign funds, was sentenced to 30 months in prison plus three years of supervised release today, The Chicago Tribune and The Chicago Sun-Times are reporting.

Earlier during the sentencing hearing, the former Democratic congressman from Chicago and his wife wept, while apologizing for their failings.

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World Cafe
11:14 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Daughn Gibson On World Cafe

Daughn Gibson.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 3:24 pm

Daughn Gibson is the alter ego of Pennsylvania singer-songwriter Josh Martin. The former stoner-rock drummer took on his nom de plume as an homage to country legend Don Gibson, which makes sense: Martin's life thus far sounds like a country song. He's worked behind the counter in an adult book store, poured tall ones as a bartender and worked as a long-haul trucker.

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Parallels
11:13 am
Wed August 14, 2013

French Maker Of Military Rafts Gets An American Identity

U.S. Marines with 4th Force Reconnaissance Company slide off F470 Combat Rubber Raiding Crafts during training in Waimanalo, Hawaii. The French company Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts for roughly two decades. Now the company is making the rafts in the U.S.
Lance Cpl. Reece E. Lodder Marine Corps Base Hawaii

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

For roughly two decades, the Zodiac has been the U.S. military's choice for inflatable rubber rafts. These rafts, especially the high-end model F470, are not the recreational rafts you take out to the lake on a Sunday, says Lionel Boudeau, the head of Zodiac's North America operations.

"It is used for a large variety of missions, like assault landings, infiltration and exfiltration," he says. "It can be deployed from the shore or deployed from the air by an aircraft, a helicopter, by a submarine. It is used by special forces and regular Army."

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The Salt
10:42 am
Wed August 14, 2013

How A Seed Saver Discovered One Of Our Favorite Tomatoes

A Cherokee purple tomato grown in Alaska in 2011.
Sherry Shiesl Tatiana's TOMATObase

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 1:04 pm

Fortunately for those of us who are suckers for novelty, every year fruits and vegetables seem to come in more bewitching colors, shapes and flavors. Lately, we've been tickled by the cotton candy grape and the vibrant orange Turkish eggplant.

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The Two-Way
10:41 am
Wed August 14, 2013

San Diego's Hooters, Other Businesses Tell Mayor To Stay Away

At the entrance to this Hooters restaurant in San Diego, the sign is up telling Mayor Bob Filner that he's not welcome.
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 10:51 am

San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, who is refusing calls to resign following the dozen or so accounts of women who say he sexually harassed them, isn't welcome at his city's Hooters restaurants.

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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Pentagon Details Plan To Extend Benefits To Same-Sex Spouses

The Pentagon said Wednesday that it will extend benefits to same-sex spouses of service members and civilian employees.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 11:37 am

The Department of Defense announced Wednesday that it is extending full benefits to the same-sex spouses of service members and civilian employees.

The move is an effort to bring Pentagon policies in line with a Supreme Court decision that found the Defense of Marriage Act was unconstitutional.

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Asia
10:28 am
Wed August 14, 2013

On Mount Everest, Sherpa Guides Bear The Brunt Of The Danger

Lhamu Chhiki's husband, Chhewang Nima, summited Mount Everest 19 times. He died while leading a private expedition on Mount Baruntse in 2010.
Courtesy of Grayson Schaffer

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 11:46 am

The Sherpa people of Nepal have become famous for guiding mountain climbers up some of the world's highest peaks, especially Mount Everest. And while Sherpa guides earn relatively good pay for their work, they and their families pay a price in death and injury. According to Grayson Schaffer, a senior editor and writer for Outside magazine, a Sherpa working above Everest's base camp is nearly 10 times more likely to die than a commercial fisherman, the most dangerous, nonmilitary occupation in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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The Two-Way
10:22 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Journalist Jack Germond, One Of The 'Boys On The Bus,' Dies

Journalist Jack Germond in August 2000 on NBC's Meet the Press.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:07 pm

Political journalist and author Jack Germond died Wednesday at his home in West Virginia. He was 85.

The longtime columnist died just as he'd finished writing a political novel titled A Small Story for Page Three, reports USA Today.

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All Tech Considered
10:14 am
Wed August 14, 2013

'The New York Times' Site, Apps Return After Two-Hour Outage

The New York Times headquarters in New York City.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 6:40 am

One of the world's most trusted sources for news is back up, after an internal outage knocked it out for nearly two hours on Wednesday morning. The New York Times' main site and mobile app went down a little after 11 a.m. ET, when users who tried to visit received a "Service Unavailable" message.

The news organization's Twitter account sent this message, before the site returned:

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Bradley Manning: 'I Am Sorry ... I Hurt The United States'

U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 3:46 pm

Update at 5:33 p.m. ET. 'I'm Sorry':

Delivering an unsworn statement before a military judge in Fort Meade, Md., Pfc. Bradley Manning apologized for perpetrating the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history.

"I'm sorry I hurt people," he said according to Reuters. "I'm sorry that I hurt the United States. I'm apologizing for the unexpected results of my actions. The last three years have been a learning experience for me."

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The Two-Way
9:29 am
Wed August 14, 2013

The Knuckleball Can Devastate, So Why Don't All Pitchers Throw It?

The knuckleball grip used by Boston Red Sox pitcher Steven Wright. Good fingernails are important.
Marvin Fong The Plain Dealer /Landov

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 4:17 pm

This sports news got our attention this week:

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Parallels
9:07 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Blast Aboard Submarine A Blow To Indian Military

A general view of a naval dockyard where a submarine caught fire and sank after an explosion early Wednesday in Mumbai, India.
Rafiq Maqbool AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 10:45 am

The deadly explosion aboard an Indian submarine with 18 sailors on board is the worst loss for the country's navy since its 1971 war with Pakistan, and is seen as a setback to India's modernization of its defense capabilities.

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All Tech Considered
8:55 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Man Learns How Not To Launch A Site For Women

Bryan Goldberg is founder and CEO of Bustle.com, a new site targeting female audiences.
Courtesy of Bryan Goldberg

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 1:02 pm

Bustle.com is a new women's site staffed by editors and writers from traditionally female-oriented organizations like Glamour and Seventeen but founded and led by a man, Bryan Goldberg. His previous venture was the multimillion-dollar sports site Bleacher Report. In announcing the launch of his new lady-targeted venture Tuesday, he wrote:

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The Two-Way
7:54 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Is Europe's Recession Really Over? It's Too Soon To Say

The line outside an employment office in Madrid last October. Spain's economy has been among the hardest hit in Europe.
Dominique Faget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:29 am

These headlines this morning make it sound like Europe's economy is up and running again:

-- "Euro Area Exits Longest Recession on Record." (Bloomberg News)

-- "Euro Zone Emerges from Recession." (The Wall Street Journal)

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Shots - Health News
7:34 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Doctors Look For A Way Off The Medical Hamster Wheel

The doctor is too tired to see you now.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:50 am

I became a doctor to help people.

When I was a medical student, I held the naive and idealistic belief that if I just did good work, the business side of things would somehow take care of itself.

How wrong I was.

Now I'm an internist taking care of all comers age 18 and up. Some days I find myself facing patients and feeling more like a harried airline clerk than a real doctor.

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All Tech Considered
7:27 am
Wed August 14, 2013

This Little Thing May Help You Find Your Keys

The Tile, accompanied by an iPhone app, locates items that are attached to it. It's about as small as a matchbook or a stamp.
Matt Perko Courtesy of Tile

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NPR Story
6:37 am
Wed August 14, 2013

UPS Plane Crashes Near Birmingham, Ala.; 2 Dead

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:16 am

A UPS cargo plane crashed near the airport in Birmingham, Ala., Wednesday morning. The pilot and co-pilot were both killed.

The Two-Way
5:45 am
Wed August 14, 2013

AOL CEO Apologizes For Public Firing

Tim Armstrong, the CEO of AOL.
Michael Kovac Getty Images for AOL

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 10:51 am

After several days of brutal criticism and commentary about the brutal way he fired a man during a conference call, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong is now apologizing.

"I am writing you to acknowledge the mistake I made last Friday during the Patch all-hands meeting when I publicly fired Abel Lenz," Armstrong says in an email to AOL employees, which Mashable has posted here.

Armstrong adds that:

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
5:43 am
Wed August 14, 2013

A Postman's 1963 Walk For Justice, Cut Short On An Alabama Road

Civil rights activist William Moore made several one-man marches for racial equality. In April 1963, he was killed during a march from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss.
Baltimore Sun

In April of 1963, a Baltimore mailman set off to deliver the most important letter in his life — one he wrote himself. William Lewis Moore decided to walk along Highway 11 from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., hoping to hand-deliver his letter to Gov. Ross Barnett. Moore wanted Barnett to fundamentally change Mississippi's racial hierarchy — something unthinkable for a Southern politician at the time.

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Around the Nation
5:41 am
Wed August 14, 2013

What Food Should Astronauts Eat On The Way To Mars?

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:16 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Two-Way
5:38 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Book News: Handwriting Offers Clues In Shakespeare Debate

Shakespeare's handwriting may offer clues to a mysterious passage in Thomas Kyd's Spanish Tragedy.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Sports
5:35 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Brazilian Soccer Team Is Full Of Stars

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

What do John Lennon, Michael Jackson and Mahatma Gandhi have in common? You guessed it: They all play for the same Brazilian soccer team. The team is Atletico Goianiense. They just signed a striker named Carlos Adriano Souza Cruz. He's better known as Adriano Michael Jackson for his smooth celebration dances. Brazilian players often go by nicknames, even putting them on their jerseys. Just ask national team player Hulk. He's the one who looks like actor Lou Ferrigno.

Parallels
5:26 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Is The Middle East Conflict Getting Even Tougher To Solve?

Israeli-Palestinian peace talks were launched 20 years ago when Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (left), Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat (right) and President Bill Clinton met at the White House on Sept. 13, 1993. But today, some of the issues appear more intractable than ever.
J. David Ake AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:23 am

When the Israelis and Palestinians signed an interim peace agreement on the White House lawn in 1993 amid soaring optimism, the Jewish settlers in the West Bank numbered a little over 100,000.

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The Two-Way
5:11 am
Wed August 14, 2013

2 Killed When UPS Cargo Plane Crashes In Alabama

Debris burns as a UPS cargo plane lies on a hill near Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport after crashing Wednesday.
Hal Yeager AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 11:36 am

We're monitoring the news from Birmingham, Ala., where a UPS cargo plane crashed Wednesday morning. UPS says the incident involves UPS Flight 1354, which was traveling from Louisville.

The flight, which would normally last about 45 minutes, had been scheduled to land before 5 a.m. local time, according to several flight-tracking websites. Louisville is in the Eastern time zone, while Birmingham is in the Central.

We'll update this post as details emerge.

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Middle East
4:56 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Months-Long Political Crisis In Egypt Erupts Into Violence

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:16 am

Security forces in Cairo have begun to forcibly disband two massive protest camps there. Supporters of ousted Islamist President Morsi have been conducting a sit-in for weeks amid threats of a government crackdown. For details, Renee Montagne talks to Michael Wahid Hanna, an analyst with The Century Foundation.

The Two-Way
4:42 am
Wed August 14, 2013

'Bloodbath' In Cairo As Troops Move On Morsi Supporters

Protesters taunt security forces moving in to clear one protest camp near the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo. The military-backed government described the camps as violent and unlawful.
Hesham Mostafa EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:00 am

  • On 'Morning Edition' just after 10 a.m. ET: NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

(We most recently updated the top of this post at 5:08 p.m. ET.)

In what looks to be the bloodiest day since the July 3 ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, dozens of people in Cairo were killed Wednesday as government forces moved to clear Morsi's supporters from sites where they have been camped.

By evening, the ministry of health reported 275 people had been killed and 2,001 had been injured across the country. The government said 43 policemen had been killed.

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