All Things Considered on KRCC 1

Weekdays 4:00-7:00 PM, Weekends 5:00-6:00 PM
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted byRobert SiegelMelissa Block and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fatsis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne.

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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NPR Story
3:13 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Teen Victoria Duval Pulls Off Major Upset At U.S. Open

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 4:39 pm

American teenager Victoria Duval pulled off a first round upset at the U.S. Open last night when she beat the 2011 tennis champ Samantha Stosur.

Media
3:13 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Kelly McEvers Reflects On Middle East Reporting As She Leaves Region

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 4:39 pm

Melissa Block has an exit interview with Kelly McEvers, who's ending a grueling years-long assignment in the Middle East that included coverage of Iraq, Syria and beyond. McEvers and her NPR colleague Deborah Amos, won four major awards in 2012 for coverage of the Syrian conflict.

It's All Politics
2:31 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Many U.S. Lawmakers Want A Say On Taking Action In Syria

Rep. Scott Rigell, R-Va., has gotten dozens of House members to sign on to a letter demanding that President Obama ask for the official blessing of Congress before attacking Syria.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 5:44 pm

The Obama administration appears poised to attack Syria after concluding Bashar Assad's government used chemical weapons, but many members of Congress say they haven't been briefed enough about why military action is warranted.

Opinions about Syria are all over the map, with many lawmakers saying the president cannot proceed without first getting authorization from Congress.

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Shots - Health News
11:12 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Diverse Gut Microbes, A Trim Waistline And Health Go Together

The tale of the tape may be told, in part, by the microbes inside you.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 4:39 pm

Scientists have discovered new clues about how microbes in our digestive systems may affect health.

European researchers found that the less diverse those microbes are, the more likely people are to gain weight, become obese and develop risk factors for serious health problems.

Evidence has been mounting in recent years that bacteria and other organisms in our bodies do a lot more than just help us digest food.

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All Tech Considered
4:12 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Outage Summer: What To Know About The Syrian Electronic Army

The New York Times headquarters building in New York City.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 4:39 pm

In the latest hacking that brought down The New York Times on Tuesday, evidence points to the activist group of hackers known as the Syrian Electronic Army. This group also took out The Washington Post briefly last week and has used phishing attacks to take control of NPR.org and other national news organizations in previous months. The Washington Post notes:

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Science
3:29 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Sophisticated Prosthetics Help Liberate Disabled Adventurers

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:31 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

A story now about technology and the creative ways it's being used to help people with disabilities enjoy the great outdoors - skiing, biking, even whitewater rafting, as Colorado Public Radio's Eric Whitney reports.

ERIC WHITNEY, BYLINE: In the equipment room at Telluride Adaptive Sports in Colorado, it's all about what works.

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Energy
3:29 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Vt. Nuclear Plant Shutdown A Sign Of Changing Energy Market

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:31 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

After years of litigation and political jousting, Vermont is set to close its only nuclear power plant by the end of next year. As John Dillon of Vermont Public Radio reports, the plant's closure is a sign of how much the country's energy market is changing.

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World
3:29 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

U.N. Security Council Not Expected To Approve Syria Strike

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:31 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A strike against Syria will almost certainly fail to win the support of the U.N. Security Council. That is because of Russian opposition, and the Chinese also oppose it. Why are the Russians so determined in their support of the Syrian regime despite Western claims that Bashar al-Assad's army has committed an atrocious war crime?

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Around the Nation
2:45 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Elite Native American Firefighters Join Crews At Yosemite

Flames burn near the Tuolumne Family Camp near Groveland, Calif., on Sunday.
Noah Berger EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 6:57 pm

One of the firefighting teams trying to contain the Rim Fire in and around Yosemite National Park is the Geronimo Hotshots team from San Carlos, Ariz., one of seven elite Native American firefighting crews in the U.S.

On the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, firefighting jobs are one of only a few ways for many young men to earn a living. For team member Jose Alvarez Santi Jr., 25, the work is rewarding — but being away from home fighting fires can be tough.

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Shots - Health News
1:55 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

After Missteps In HIV Care, South Africa Finds Its Way

A nurse takes a blood sample from Nkosi Minenhle, 15, in a mobile clinic set up to test students for HIV at Madwaleni High School in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa.
Stephane de Sakutin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 2:39 pm

South Africa has more people with HIV than any other country in the world.

Roughly 5.5 million of its 53 million citizens are infected with the virus. In some of the hardest hit parts of the country, one-third of women of childbearing age are HIV positive.

Now, after years of delay and mistakes, South Africa is transforming how it approaches the disease.

The South African government is simplifying AIDS care, cutting treatment costs and providing antiviral drugs to almost 2 million people every day.

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U.S.
10:00 am
Tue August 27, 2013

For Kids With Special Needs, More Places To Play

Brooklyn Fisher rolls down the ramp on the playground named for her in Pocatello, Idaho. The playground was built using accessible features so children of all abilities could play alongside each other.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 4:31 pm

Remember running around the playground when you were a kid? Maybe hanging from the monkey bars or seeing who could swing the highest?

It wasn't just a mindless energy burn. Many have called play the work of childhood. Play teaches children how to make friends, make rules and navigate relationships.

But for kids whose disabilities keep them from using playgrounds, those opportunities can be lost.

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The March On Washington At 50
3:48 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Sleepy, Southern And Segregated: What D.C. Was Like In '63

Charter bus passengers look for their transportation home after the March on Washington of Aug. 28, 1963.
AP

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

Fifty years ago this week, when hundreds of thousands of demonstrators came from across the country to take part in the 1963 March on Washington, the city was not yet the cosmopolitan capital that it arguably is today.

But it was a mecca for African-Americans, says historian Marya McQuirter.

"Washington was definitely a different city 50 years ago," she says, "for a number of reasons. By 1957, it had become the largest majority black city in the country."

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The Salt
3:26 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

'Braai Day' Aims To Bring S. Africans Together Over Barbecue

Jan Scannell, former accountant, has taken on a new identity as "Jan Braai," a South African TV show host and media personality promoting the idea of National Braai (barbecuing) Day, celebrated each year on Sept. 24.
Courtesy of Stephanus Rabie

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

Nelson Mandela is officially "improving," though still in critical condition at a South African hospital. His long battle with a lung infection has South Africans anxiously contemplating their "post-Mandela" future in a still racially divided country. In a unique strategy, one man is hoping to help heal those divisions with a pair of barbecue tongs.

Jan Scannell is a 32-year-old former accountant with a dream: To establish a national holiday in South Africa like July 4 called Braai Day.

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Law
3:26 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Embattled LA Sheriff Still Plans To Give Fifth Term A Shot

Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca at the Men's Central Jail in downtown LA in 2012. Baca, who has been under fire for jailhouse abuses, is facing calls to step down and not seek a fifth term.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca — who oversees the largest municipal jail system in the country — is facing growing pressure to bow out of the race for what could be his fifth term.

There's a lot that's been piling up against Sheriff Baca lately. At the top of the list is an FBI probe into what's been described as a systemic pattern of unnecessary force against inmates in county jails.

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Sports
2:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Was 1973 'Battle Of The Sexes' Tennis Match Thrown?

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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Strange News
2:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Finns Dominate Mobile Phone Throwing World Championship

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And we wrap up this week's All Tech Considered with a story out of Finland.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This past weekend, 80 people from six countries competed in the annual Mobile Phone Throwing World Championships. The Finns shut out the competition, winning first, second and third place overall.

SIEGEL: The top tosser threw his handheld device an impressive 320 feet. The top woman on the field was a 31-year-old Swede - Asa Lundgren. Her distance: 132 feet. She's a newcomer to the sport but threw javelin in her youth.

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Law
2:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Liens By 'Sovereign Citizens' A Headache For State Officials

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The New York Times reported last week on the practice of placing bogus liens against the property of government officials. It's a tactic of self-styled sovereign citizens, people who deny the legitimacy of the federal government. They take advantage of laws, both real estate laws and also the Uniform Commercial Code, that make it easy to file liens even if they're phony. Why do they do it? Well, because a lien can ruin your credit rating, and removing one, even a phony lien, can take countless hours in court and cost thousands of dollars.

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The Two-Way
12:29 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Wingsuit Flying: Incredible Thrill, But 'No Second Chance'

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 3:30 pm

"There is no second chance ... there is no margin of error whatsoever."

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All Tech Considered
11:54 am
Mon August 26, 2013

'I'd Tap That' And Other NSA Pickup Lines Are All The Rage

An anti-NSA protester in Washington, DC.
Steve Rhodes Flickr

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:58 pm

News that National Security Agency officers sometimes abuse domestic intelligence gathering practices to monitor potential love interests has led to a sweeping, satirical response by The People of The Internet. On Tumblr and Twitter, the #NSAPickupLines and #NSALovePoems hashtags have sparked all sorts of creativity from users poking fun at the potential intrusion of the NSA into our personal lives.

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Sports
3:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Quitting Your Job For Fantasy Football

Fantasy sports attract an estimated 36+ million players in the U.S. and Canada.
istockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 4:04 pm

You may just call it late summer; for many die-hard sports fans, it's called fantasy football drafting season.

Fantasy sports is a huge business, with an estimated 36 million people in the U.S. and Canada picking teams and talkin' trash, according to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association.

And now we may be at a tipping point.

One man - Drew Dinkmeyer - actually left his job as an investment analyst to play fantasy sports full-time.

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Around the Nation
3:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

The Howl Of The Eastern Timber Wolf

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's August, and that means a lot of us are looking for something out of the ordinary to do. And every August for the past 50 years, people from all around the world have made the journey to Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario to hear the howl of the eastern timber wolf, once a ubiquitous sound in the wild. Reporter Natasha Haverty sends this postcard.

RICK STRONKS: OK. How many people are here from outside Canada and the U.S.? Look at that. Amazing.

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Music Interviews
3:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Julia Holter's 'Loud City Song' Is A Story On Top Of A Story

Julia Holter's latest album is titled Loud City Song.
Rick Bahto Courtesy of the artist

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Books
2:52 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

'Heart' Of Iranian Identity Reimagined For A New Generation

In "The Nightmare of Siavosh," the young exiled Iranian prince dreams of his impending demise. Upon waking, he tells his wife, Farigis, about his fears regarding the tragic events to come.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 5:14 am

A thousand years ago, a Persian poet named Abolqasem Ferdowsi of Tous obtained a royal commission to put the ancient legends and myths of Iran into a book of verse.

He called this epic Shahnameh, or "Epic of the Persian Kings." It took him more than three decades and comprises 60,000 couplets — twice the length of The Iliad and The Odyssey combined.

Author Azar Nafisi, who wrote the memoir Reading Lolita in Tehran, says the importance of this foundational myth epic to Iranians can't really be overstated.

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Ecstatic Voices
10:03 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Atheists Take Old Hymns Out Of The Chapel And Into The Streets

The Renaissance Street Singers give a performance at the Winterdale Arch, near the West 81st Street gate in Central Park.
Joel Rose NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 8:16 am

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Author Interviews
3:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

'The Blessing Cup': Polacco And Her Family Of Storytellers

Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:17 am

Patricia Polacco has written and illustrated more than 90 picture books. Her young readers are drawn to her stories about family and growing up. She has won many awards for her illustrations, which are done in gorgeous, full watercolor. Polacco's latest book is called The Blessing Cup.

Polacco tells NPR's Jacki Lyden that early life had a profound effect on her work. Many of her books feature her grandmother, called "Babushka" in Yiddish, and take place on her grandmother's farm in Michigan.

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Art & Design
3:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

Hacker-Artist's Mantra: 'Fun Makes The Politics Go Down'

Artwork from Roth's solo exhibition "Welcome to Detroit," on display at Eastern Michigan University in 2012.
Evan Roth

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:17 am

Evan Roth knows how to get a rise out of the people and organizations he targets.

Over his career, the Michigan-born "hacker-artist" has taken on Google, the Transportation Safety Administration, and — most bravely of all — Justin Bieber's fans, Beliebers.

Some might call him a prankster, a rabble-rouser, or an enfant terrible, but Roth prefers "hacker-artist" despite the connotation that "hacker" might hold for some people.

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Law
3:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

N.Y. County Outsources The Job Of Monitoring Sex Offenders

suing Suffolk County, N.Y., contending its new sex offender monitoring law violates his civil rights." href="/post/ny-county-outsources-job-monitoring-sex-offenders" class="noexit lightbox">
Troy Wallace with his wife, Lynda. Wallace is suing Suffolk County, N.Y., contending its new sex offender monitoring law violates his civil rights.
Charles Lane NPR

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:17 am

A suburban county on Long Island, N.Y., is taking a novel approach to monitoring sex offenders: It's giving the job to a victims' advocacy group.

The measure was approved unanimously earlier this year; lawmakers call it a cost-effective way to keep citizens safe. But a local lawyer calls it a "vigilante exercise," and convicted sex offenders are organizing to challenge the legislation.

'The Trackers'

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NPR Story
2:57 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

It's Pandamonium Once Again In Washington, D.C.

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:17 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

We have a cub. The National Zoo made that announcement in all caps on Twitter at 5:32 p.m. last night. The zoo's giant panda, Mei Xiang, gave birth to her third cub Friday. Now there's a state of, wait for it, pandamonium here in Washington. Thousands of eyes were glued to the zoo's panda cam as the tiny creature came into the world.

(SOUNDBITE OF BABY PANDA)

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NPR Story
2:57 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

Remembering Ethicist Jean Bethke Elshtain, Who Backed 'Justifiable War'

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:17 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Writer and ethicist Jean Bethke Elshtain died this month in Nashville, Tenn. She was 72. As a very specific kind of political theorist, Elshtain was known as a realist, unafraid to talk about God. It made her a unique and influential public intellectual of her time. Rather unusually, she held a joint appointment at the University of Chicago in both the divinity school and the political science department. William Schweiker was Elshtain's colleague at the U of C, and her friend; and he offered this remembrance.

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NPR Story
2:57 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

In Tennessee Jail, It May Soon Be Pay To Stay

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:17 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

If you do the crime, you do the time. But if you're doing time at Anderson County Jail in Clinton, Tennessee, it may get a bit more expensive. This week, lawmakers in the county passed a resolution that would charge inmates for basic necessities: nine bucks for pants, $6.26 for a blanket, 29 cents for a roll of toilet paper.

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