All Things Considered on KRCC 1

Weekdays 4:00-7:00 PM, Weekends 5:00-6:00 PM
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted byRobert SiegelMelissa Block and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fatsis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne.

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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Sports
3:07 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

For Physicians, The Ethics Of Treating Athletes

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 7:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Several hundred pro-football players say that the National Football League supplied them with painkillers, risky narcotics, to keep them playing, despite injuries. Some say they weren't told of the seriousness of those injuries. Others say they became addicted to the drugs and they have sued.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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NPR News Investigations
2:39 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Court Fees Drive Many Poor Defendants Underground

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 8:14 am

The use of fines and fees charged to criminal defendants has exploded. An NPR investigation has found people who can't afford those charges can go to jail for not paying. Hundreds of thousands are hiding from police and the courts.

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Photography And Memory
2:35 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Take Photos To Remember Your Experiences? Think Again

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 10:57 am

Kicking off a series that explores the relationship between human memory and photography in the age of smartphone cameras, Audie Cornish talks to psychologist Linda Henkel about whether photographs impair our memory.

"As soon as you hit click on that camera, it's as if you've outsourced your memory," Henkel says. "Anytime we kind of count on these external memory devices, we're taking away from the kind of mental cognitive processing that might help us actually remember that stuff on our own."

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Economy
2:10 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Penny Hoarders Hope For The Day The Penny Dies

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 7:21 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Every year, the U.S. government loses money minting pennies. They cost around twice as much to make as they're worth. And some politicians and economists say we ought to just get rid of them. They want the U.S. to kill the penny, take it out of circulation. If that happens, a small group of people plan to make a bunch of money.

NPR's Zoe Chace has that story from our Planet Money team.

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Politics
8:20 am
Wed May 21, 2014

In Kentucky Primary, McConnell Bests Tea Party Challenger

In a day packed full of primaries, voters headed to the polls in six states — including three that are expected to have highly competitive Senate races.

Politics
3:18 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Despite Drama, Oregon GOP Choice Comes Down To Purity, Practicality

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:16 pm

Two Republicans with compelling personal stories are vying for the chance to unseat Oregon's incumbent Democratic senator, Jeff Merkley. Monica Wehby is a doctor with a rare specialty: She performs brain surgery on kids. Her chief opponent, Jason Conger, rose from extreme poverty to attend Harvard Law School in just a few years. The Northwest News Network's Chris Lehman reports on the GOP primary as it unfolds.

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Movie Interviews
3:18 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Filmmaker Brings Light To Roma, Holocaust Victims Lost To History

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:16 pm

The Roma people — commonly called Gypsies — have long been relegated to the margins of European society. As outsiders, they were targeted during the Holocaust, but the number of victims remains little-known. Filmmaker Aaron Yeger tells their story in the documentary A People Uncounted, and he joins the program to explain more.

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Music
3:18 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Heir To A Jazz Legacy, A Trumpeter Finds His Own Way

Theo Croker's new album, AfroPhysicist, comes out May 20.
Thomas Brodin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 8:20 am

Jazz composer and trumpeter Theo Croker opens his new album, AfroPhysicist, with an ode to his grandfather: New Orleans jazz great Doc Cheatham. The thing is, Croker didn't grow up in New Orleans or any other jazz hub. He's from Jacksonville, Fla., and he was just a child when his grandfather died in 1997. It wasn't until his grandfather's memorial services — attended by jazz legends — that he decided to join the legacy.

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Science
2:42 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Big Bang's Ripples: Two Scientists Recall Their Big Discovery

The Holmdel Horn Antenna at Bell Telephone Laboratories in New Jersey was built in 1959 to make the first phone call via satellite.
NASA

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 6:27 pm

On May 20, 1964, two astronomers working at a New Jersey laboratory turned a giant microwave antenna toward what they thought would be a quiet part of the Milky Way. They weren't searching for anything; they were trying to make adjustments to their instrument before looking at more interesting things in the sky.

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NPR Ed
2:37 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

Anatomy Of A Great Commencement Speech

Comedian and actress Amy Poehler addresses Harvard University's graduating class of 2011 on the school's campus, in Cambridge, Mass.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 8:20 am

It's that time again — graduation season. And that means next week or last week or right this very minute, some 7 million students in the U.S. and lots of doting parents have to sit through a commencement speech.

If you're stuck listening to a particularly bad one — or just need an inspiration infusion — the NPR Ed Team has sifted through hundreds of past speeches (going all the way back to 1774) and built an online database of the very best.

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Europe
2:37 pm
Tue May 20, 2014

UK Government Asks: What's The Greatest Challenge Of Our Time?

Originally published on Wed May 21, 2014 8:20 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, a prize that's making a return: the Longitude Prize.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It was set up in 1714 by the British government to solve the greatest challenge of that time: Pinpoint a ship's location at sea by knowing its longitude.

CORNISH: Three hundred years later, there's a video announcing its return.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: We're at the dawn of a new world.

SIEGEL: Its committee is led by Lord Martin Rees, a professor at Cambridge University.

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Remembrances
3:10 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

For A Showman Larger Than Life, An Even Bigger Best Friend

When your best friend weighs several tons, sometimes a trunk hug will have to do.
Scott Raffe Courtesy of Shotwell Media

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 1:41 pm

Ivor David Balding once said, "I wanted an elephant all my life." And he got her: Balding adopted a baby elephant named Flora. Together, he and his beloved elephant were the stars of Circus Flora, which he co-founded in St. Louis. Decades later, the circus remains an institution in the city.

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Law
3:07 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Fiery British Imam Found Guilty Of Terrorism Charges

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 6:54 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

In New York, a jury has found a British imam guilty on 11 counts of terrorism. Abu Hamza al-Masri was a fiery speaker at a London mosque and he's seen as an inspiration to people who later became familiar names in terror cases. People like attempted shoe bomber Richard Reid, who visited that mosque. Now, after a relatively quick trial, he's been found guilty, like several of his followers before him.

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Politics
3:07 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Tea Party Stumbles As GOP Establishment Flexes Fundraising Strength

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 6:54 pm

Tea Party candidates did well in GOP primary elections in 2010 and 2012; this year, not so much. Part of this lack of success is because establishment candidates have generally out-raised them, and establishment-aligned outside groups are no longer reluctant to get involved in primaries.

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Europe
2:16 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

The Blogging Battlegrounds Of Eastern Ukraine

Separatists occupy the administration building in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk. Pro-Ukraine bloggers and activists say they've had to leave eastern cities because of threats and surveillance by separatists.
Fabio Bucciarelli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 6:54 pm

As Ukraine prepares for presidential elections on Sunday, a social media struggle is underway in the country's eastern provinces.

That's where pro-Russian separatists have seized government buildings in many towns and declared independence after a much-disputed referendum. The separatists have vowed to block the vote in at least two key regions, Donetsk and Luhansk.

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

California Chrome's Triple Crown Hopes Hang On By A Nasal Strip

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 6:54 pm

California Chrome has already won the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes, but for one day, its hopes for a Triple Crown were in danger. In its first two races, the horse had worn a nasal strip, which wasn't permitted at Belmont Park — until Monday. Dave Grening, the New York Correspondent for the Daily Racing Form, explains the situation.

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Technology
2:16 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

The Rise Of Blogger-Activists, And The Regimes That Rule By Fear

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 6:54 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Emily Parker has written about how the Internet is changing activism. Her new book is called "Now I Know Who My Comrades Are: Voices from the Underground."

Emily Parker, thanks for coming in to our New York bureau.

EMILY PARKER: Thank you so much for having me.

CORNISH: So your research comes in part from interviews with bloggers and online activists in countries like Russia. Give us a sense, what are some of the advantages that they have today compared to a generation or two ago?

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Sports
4:28 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Softballers Face A Fielder's Choice: When To Wear A Face Mask?

Ferris High School softball player Kylee Fowler stands beside the dugout, face mask on and ready.
Lauren Silverman KERA News

In Texas, it's playoff time for high school softball teams. While softball is one of the safest high school sports in the state, concussions remain a real risk for players — especially those who frequently field line drives from batters. That's partly why this year, fans and spectators can expect to see more girls wearing face masks than they have in the past.

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Asia
3:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

In Sea Change Election, Young India Ushers In A New Political Era

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 4:28 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Tess Vigeland in for Arun Rath. This week, Narendra Modi and his BJP party won India's general election in a landslide. Modi's historic victory upends years of political domination by the Gandhi family, which has been a ruling power since India's independence. NPR's Julie McCarthy is in New Delhi, and I asked her what Modi's election says about the kind of country India is now?

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Music Interviews
3:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

Six Decades Later, A Long-Lost Hank Williams Recording Resurfaces

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:35 am

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

All right. If you're just joining us, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Tess Vigeland.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVE RADIO BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: It's "The Garden Spot" Program presenting the songs of Hank Williams.

VIGELAND: Let's travel back for a few minutes to the year 1950.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

HANK WILLIAMS: (Singing) Hello, everybody, Garden Spot is on the air. So just relax and listen in your easy rocking chair.

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Humans
3:00 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

The First American Teenager, Millennia-Old And Underwater

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 4:28 pm

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

From the studios of NPR West in Culver City, California it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'M Tess Vigeland. Let us contemplate the American teenage girl, perhaps the very first one. Apparently, there's been some scientific debate about who she is and whether she hails from the same gene sequence as what we think of as the first Americans, American Indians. And when I say gene sequence, we're not talking about Skinnies from Urban Outfitters. NPR's science correspondent Joe Palca has the story of a very old American teenage identity crisis.

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The New And The Next
4:53 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Shifting Images: Cleaning Up Amsterdam And Controversial Art

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:06 am

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

It is time for The New and The Next.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

VIGELAND: Eugene Robinson is the deputy editor of the online magazine Ozy. And he's filling in for Carlos Watson this week as we talk about what's new and what's next. Welcome back, Eugene.

EUGENE WATSON: Hey, thanks for having me, Tess.

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Religion
3:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Southern Baptist Leaders Seek Softer Approach To Homosexuality

Pastor Jimmy Scroggins (right) tells other Southern Baptist leaders to be compassionate to gay people during a leadership summit in April.
ERLC Leadership Summit/Flickr

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 4:29 pm

Some Christian denominations around the U.S. have been slowly warming to the idea of gay marriage. A few have even made an about-face.

Not so with the country's largest protestant group, Southern Baptists. The Southern Baptist Convention still preaches that marriage can only be between one man and one woman. But some pastors are softening their message.

A Change Of Tone

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Shots - Health News
3:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Filtering A New Idea: A Book That's Educational And 'Drinkable'

Contaminated water can spread diseases like cholera and typhoid. A new project aims to provide water filters in the form of an educational book.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 8:32 pm

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U.S.
3:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Veterans Advocate Says He Fears Loss Of Faith In VA

Tom Tarantino, chief policy officer at Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill Thursday about holding the Department of Veterans Affairs accountable.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 4:52 pm

Advocate and former Army Capt. Tom Tarantino says he's worried that allegations over delayed health care will keep veterans away from services.

"Our biggest fear is that there are veterans out there who are not going to seek help because they lose faith and they lose trust in the VA," he tells Tess Vigeland, guest host of All Things Considered.

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Law
3:07 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

How It Happened: 10 Years Of Gay Marriage

Originally published on Sun May 18, 2014 12:05 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TESS VIGELAND, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West in for Arun Rath.

Ten years ago today, gay marriage became a reality in Massachusetts.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

VIGELAND: Just after midnight, thousands celebrated what was once just a dream.

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Code Switch
4:36 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Federal Goverment Jeopardizes Navajo Family's Ties To Its Home

Navajo elder Stella Peshlakai Smith, 89, stands at a traditional dwelling on her homestead at Wupatki National Monument in 2014. The National Park Service says her children cannot stay when she dies.
Felicia Fonseca AP

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 8:46 am

At 89 years old, Stella Peshlakai Smith shuffles around her Arizona yard in white tennis shoes and a long traditional Navajo skirt. She points to her ceremonial home, called a hogan. "My father made this one [almost 100 years ago]," Smith says. Her modern house sits next door.

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This Week's Must Read
3:41 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

A 'New York Times' Shake-Up, But Not The One You're Thinking Of

Taxis speed past the headquarters of the New York Times.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 9:51 am

It's not all that often that the New York Times goes from printing the biggest stories of the day to actually being the biggest story of the day. But that's exactly what happened this week when the publisher, Arthur Sulzberger Jr. replaced Jill Abramson as the executive editor.

The Times has dealt with big problems before. I'm thinking of course about about Jayson Blair. Seth Mnookin's book, Hard News, is the definitive account of that saga. It's the story of an old line institution that allowed a snake to slip through unnoticed.

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The Two-Way
3:39 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Ancient Skeleton In Mexico Sheds Light On Americas Settlement

In this June 2013 photo provided by National Geographic, diver Susan Bird, working at the bottom of Hoyo Negro, a large dome-shaped underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, brushes the Naia skull found at the site.
Paul Nicklen AP

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 6:00 pm

The nearly complete skeleton of a teenage girl who died some 12,000 to 13,000 years ago in a cave in the Yucatan Peninsula, has yielded DNA clues linking her to Native Americans living today.

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NPR Story
2:57 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

What's In A Name? Plenty Of Ways To Make A Mistake

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 6:00 pm

When Arizona State University graduates hear their names announced, they have Peter Lafford to thank. It's his job to ensure students' names are pronounced correctly — and it's not always an easy task.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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