All Things Considered on KRCC 1

Weekdays 4:00-7:00 PM, Weekends 5:00-6:00 PM
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted byRobert SiegelMelissa Block and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fatsis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne.

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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All Tech Considered
2:44 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Is Your Watch Or Thermostat A Spy? Cybersecurity Firms Are On It

After Grant Hernandez, an undergraduate security researcher at the University of Central Florida, hacked Nest, he programmed it to riff off a favorite line from the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey.
Aarti Shahani NPR

Originally published on Fri November 7, 2014 9:15 am

There is a sharp divide in the technology world. One camp is racing to connect our devices to the Internet, to make everything — from the watch to the refrigerator — smart, so to speak.

The other camp is terrified of what that means: everyday objects that can be hacked, easily, to spy on us and hand off valuable data to cybercriminals. The cynics are gathered in Las Vegas this week, at the security conference Black Hat.

The Nest Hacker

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Around the Nation
2:44 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Carroll, Iowa: Where The Childhood Paper Route Is Alive And Well

It takes Jaxson Kuhlmann, 11, less than 30 minutes to complete his paper route in Carroll, Iowa. He's paid 10 to 12 cents per copy to deliver the paper five days a week.
Noah Adams for NPR

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 10:21 am

This story began in 2012 while I was working on a story in Iowa. I was taking pictures on a foggy afternoon and saw a young girl on a blue bicycle, a newspaper bag slung across her shoulder. She stopped and held up a copy of The Daily Times Herald.

These days, most newspapers are delivered by fast-moving adults driving vans and trucks. I guess I didn't know that kids still had paper routes, anywhere.

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The Salt
2:23 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Truth In Labeling: Celiac Community Cheers FDA Rule For Gluten Free

An FDA rule effective Aug. 5 states that foods may be labeled "gluten free" only if there's less than 20 parts per million of the protein.
James Benet iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 5:29 pm

If you spot a food package label that says gluten free, you can now be pretty well assured that the label means what it says.

As of Aug. 5, all food manufacturers must be in compliance with a new labeling standard set by the Food and Drug Administration.

The rule states that foods may be labeled "gluten free" only if there's less than 20 parts per million of the protein.

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Remembrances
2:04 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

From Surgeon General To Smoking Foe: Remembering Dr. Steinfeld

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 5:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Economy
2:04 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Construction Industry Missing Key Tool: Skilled Workers

After laying off roughly 2 million workers during the recession, the construction industry may not have enough crews to keep up with demand for building projects.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 5:56 pm

It's a beautiful day and Jeremy Smith, the business manager for a school district in northern Wyoming, is showing off the new Tongue River Elementary School — or at least the plot of land where the school should be.

"What you're going to see when you get up here a little bit closer is you are going to just see pasture," Smith says.

The school was supposed to be under construction by now, but last month state officials said they didn't have the money.

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National Security
5:45 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Victim Of Insider Attack, Gen. Harold Greene Was An Engineer By Training

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 7:46 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Book Reviews
4:44 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

With Magic And Fables, 'Angel Of Losses' Breathes Life Into History

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 7:47 am

At the heart of Stephanie Feldman's debut, The Angel of Losses, is a deceptively straightforward story. The heroine, Marjorie, is a Ph.D. student living and studying in New York. Her subject is the "Wandering Jew" — the mapping and reclamation of an ancient legend. She spends her days in the library, reading and researching, the evenings redrafting and honing her thesis. She is a woman with "a weakness for stories," but one who is often selfish and cold. When we meet her, she seems well on the way to walling herself into an ivory tower.

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The Salt
4:21 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

No More Reservations: Exclusive Restaurants Require Tickets Instead

A peek inside the kitchen of Next, an early adopter of the ticket system that's replacing reservations at some restaurants.
Courtesy of Christian Seel

Originally published on Mon August 11, 2014 8:57 am

Have you ever wanted a ticket to see your favorite band so much that you could taste it?

You set the alarm, and start calling or clicking right when the tickets go on sale. You try again and again, until, finally, you snag a ticket. And even though the process is a pain, when you succeed, you feel like part of an exclusive group.

In the future, going out to eat could become a lot like going to a sold-out rock concert. In fact, some of the hottest restaurants now sell tickets instead of taking reservations.

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Trade Lingo
3:33 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

In Some Circles, Slowpoke Flight Attendants Go By 'Salads'

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 7:47 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Africa
2:48 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Obama Calls On Business To Bridge Divide Between U.S. And Africa

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 7:47 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Around the Nation
2:42 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

A 30-Foot Cliff Makes This Eatery A Different Kind Of Dive Bar

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 7:47 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Health
2:35 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Numbers Of Americans With Health Plans Way Up, But States Vary

Arkansas, Kentucky, Delaware and Colorado have all seen significant increases since 2013 in the percentage of residents who have health insurance.
Vectoraart/iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 7:47 am

A Gallup poll released Tuesday suggests the Affordable Care Act is significantly increasing the number of Americans with health insurance, especially in states that are embracing it. It echoes previous Gallup surveys, and similar findings by the Urban Institute and Rand Corp.

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Africa
2:21 pm
Tue August 5, 2014

Ebola Photographer Introduces The West To Outbreak's Victims

Originally published on Wed August 6, 2014 9:58 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

If you watched any TV news today, you probably saw images of an ambulance making its way to the streets of Atlanta. The ambulance pulls up to hospital carrying an American infected with the Ebola virus. The whole trip was narrated by CNN.

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Middle East
3:03 pm
Mon August 4, 2014

Gaza Family Mourns The Loss Of A Son, Brother — And Hamas Militant

Originally published on Mon August 4, 2014 5:09 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Men In America
2:59 pm
Mon August 4, 2014

What's The Big Screen Recipe For A Good Guy-Cry? You Tell Us

Originally published on Tue August 5, 2014 1:50 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

OK, grab the tissues, get a firm shoulder to lean on. It's time for a big cry.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "ANCHORMAN")

WILL FERRELL: (As Ron Burgundy) (Crying).

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Iraq
2:53 pm
Mon August 4, 2014

Islamic State Bolsters Its Control Over Northwestern Iraq

Originally published on Mon August 4, 2014 5:09 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Remembrances
2:53 pm
Mon August 4, 2014

Jim Brady, Press Secretary Turned Gun Control Activist, Dies At 73

Originally published on Mon August 4, 2014 5:09 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Technology
2:53 pm
Mon August 4, 2014

Tech Companies Take Notice Of The Importance Of Marketing

Originally published on Tue August 5, 2014 7:58 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

What we just heard from Laura Sydell has deep roots in the culture of tech companies.

ALEX KANTROWITZ: There is this sort of tech myth, which is that it's product, product, product, and marketing doesn't matter.

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Around the Nation
4:52 pm
Sun August 3, 2014

Amid Lake Erie's Algal Bloom, Toledo's Water Woes Continue

Copyright 2014 Michigan Radio. To see more, visit http://michiganradio.org/.

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

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Author Interviews
4:52 pm
Sun August 3, 2014

Amid Rising College Costs, A Defense Of The Liberal Arts

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon August 4, 2014 7:18 am

The price of a college education is soaring in America; so is the amount of student loan debt. President Obama has proposed regulations that would cap student loan payments at 10 percent of a graduate's income, and according to the latest Labor Department data, about a third of recent college graduates are either underemployed or jobless.

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Education
4:52 pm
Sun August 3, 2014

Debunking Common Myths About The Common Core

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 10:11 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

I'm joined now by my colleague on the NPR Ed Team, Cory Turner. He's done most of our Common Core reporting, and he edited this postcard series. Cory, thanks for coming in.

CORY TURNER, BYLINE: Thanks for having me, Eric.

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Music News
3:04 pm
Sun August 3, 2014

Met Opera's Union Lockout Postponed; Financial Analysis To Come

A worker unveils advertisement for future productions at the Metropolitan Opera at Lincoln Center in New York City. The Metropolitan Opera's general manager Peter Gelb has threatened a lockout if there is no an agreement with unions to that represent musicians, stagehands and other employees.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 10:11 am

Labor negotiations for New York's Metropolitan Opera took a surprising turn Saturday evening. Twelve of the opera's 16 unions faced the threat of a lockout at midnight Sunday, but negotiations were put on hold for a week while an outside analyst takes a look at the Met's finances.

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My Big Break
3:04 pm
Sun August 3, 2014

Danny Trejo: From The Big House To The Big Screen

Danny Trejo's big break came about partly because of a prison tattoo on his chest, depicting a woman wearing a sombrero. Thanks to that distinctive mark, a screenwriter recognized him as a champion boxer.
Carlos Jasso AP

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 10:10 am

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Fans know Danny Trejo for all the tough guys he's played in action movies like Machete and From Dusk Till Dawn. He's been cast as that kind of character since the start of his career — his very first role was as a convict in the 1985 film Runaway Train.

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Around the Nation
3:04 pm
Sun August 3, 2014

Say Bye-Bye To A Beloved Kiddie Amusement Park

Originally published on Tue August 5, 2014 8:26 am

As you enter the gates of Hoffman's Playland, a kiddie amusement park just outside Albany, N.Y., a 62-year-old merry-go-round lures you with multi-colored horses and the tunes of yesteryear. An old-fashioned, pint-sized train engine, piloted by an engineer in full garb, lumbers by, toting four carloads of families. Kids ring bells and beep horns from little boats and cars.

On a recent Saturday, the park is packed with families. Hoffman's has been a summer-must for three generations of residents of New York's Capital Region.

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Economy
4:25 pm
Sat August 2, 2014

Stock Markets Take A Dive After Months Of Growth

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 12:35 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

From the studios of NPR West in Culver City, California, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Eric Westervelt.

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Politics
4:25 pm
Sat August 2, 2014

Congress In Recess After A Notably Unproductive Session

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 9:57 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:09 pm
Sat August 2, 2014

Bounding From Boat To Mailbox, Young Letter Carrier Delivers

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 9:58 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

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Music Interviews
3:09 pm
Sat August 2, 2014

Better Late Than Never: Soul Singer Hits National Spotlight

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 9:56 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Eric Westervelt.

(SOUNDBITE OF ALBUM, "COLD WORLD")

SHELTON AND THE GOSPEL QUEENS: (Singing) Moving and I feel all right. Here's a song you'll wanna write.

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Sports
3:09 pm
Sat August 2, 2014

3 Grads Of Historically Black Schools Enter Football Hall Of Fame

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 9:56 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Eric Westervelt. In Canton, Ohio tonight, seven men are being inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, including former New York Giants defensive end Michael Strahan.

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Around the Nation
4:00 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

A Right Or A Privilege? Detroit Residents Split Over Water Shut-Offs

Demonstrators protest against the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department last month. Thousands of the city's customers are behind on their water payments.
Joshua Lott Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:02 pm

In Detroit, protests continue over the city's massive effort to shut off water to thousands of customers who aren't paying their bills. Activists call the move a violation of a basic human need, while city officials call it an economic reality.

Detroit's Water and Sewerage Department has been accruing a massive debt for decades — in part because officials say there was only a token attempt to collect past-due bills. By this year, about half of all water customers were behind on payments, owing a combined $90 million.

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