All Things Considered on KRCC 1

Weekdays 4:00-7:00 PM, Weekends 5:00-6:00 PM
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted byRobert SiegelMelissa Block and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fatsis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne.

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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Found Recipes
2:03 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Zwetschgendatschi, A Mouthful That Captures The Perfect Plum

Zwetschgendatschi is the Bavarian word for plum cake. The dessert uses Damson plums, which are only in season for a few weeks each year.
Courtesy of Gesine Bullock-Prado

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 3:48 pm

If it's early August, it must be time for Damson plums. Gersine Bullock-Prado — a Vermont-based pastry chef and author of Bake It Like You Mean It — has a special place in her heart for them.

"They're not like your normal plum. They're not round. They're oval and very dark purple, almost black."

When barely ripe, the plums are firm, tart and olive green, Bullock-Prado says. "[They're] just these lovely little orbs of joy."

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Code Switch
1:29 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Sikhs Remember Tragedy By Embracing Faith

Worshippers at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek. The Aug. 5, 2012, shooting tragedy has brought some Sikhs closer to their faith.
Erin Toner WUWM

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 3:48 pm

Every Sunday, hundreds of worshippers descend on the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek, just south of Milwaukee. They come here to pray and to eat a weekly meal together, called a langar. On Aug. 5, 2012, as women were preparing the meal, a gunman opened fire, killing six people, including the temple president, a priest, fathers and a mother, before turning the gun on himself. Photos of the victims now hang in the lobby of the temple, called a gurdwara.

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Around the Nation
4:45 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Twice Rejected, LGBT Group Won't Give Up On Boy Scout Bid

Senicka Arciaga-Spears (left), with his siblings and mothers, Kelly and Eliza. Senicka hopes to join the Boy Scouts if the Utah Pride Center's troop charter application is accepted.
Terry Gildea KUER

Seventh-grader Senicka Arciaga-Spears wants to be a Boy Scout. Over a homemade Sunday evening dinner, he tells his two moms, Eliza and Kelly, that he wants to learn survival skills — including fishing and "dangerous hiking."

Eliza would like her son to join the Scouts, too. "They teach discipline and obedience and respect and self-sufficiency. I want that for him," she says. "I want him to learn those things and be surrounded by those things."

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Media
2:52 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Local Kentucky TV Station Wants To 'Un-Hype' The News

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 4:05 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

In local TV news, one of the most basic ways to appeal to viewers is to constantly promise breaking news, but one station in Louisville, Kentucky, is taking a different approach. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik tells us more.

DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: The spot is for WDRB television in Louisville.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV BROADCAST)

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Africa
2:52 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Opposition Claims Zimbabwe Elections Were Manipulated

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 4:05 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The people of Zimbabwe cast ballots today for their next president. It's a two-horse race. Longtime president Robert Mugabe is once again being challenged by opposition leader and prime minister Morgan Tsvangirai. Violence and fear that followed an election five years ago have eased, but the opposition is again making claims that the election has been manipulated.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is in the Zimbabwean capital, Harare.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Foreign language spoken)

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National Security
2:52 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Bradley Manning Had Long Been Plagued By Mental Health Issues

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 4:05 pm

Sentencing began Wednesday in the trial of Army Pvt. Bradley Manning. Journalist Steve Fishman wrote an in-depth profile of Manning for New York Magazine. He speaks to Melissa Block about the famed Wikileaker who faces years in prison.

Religion
1:46 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Should Military Chaplains Have To Believe In God?

There has been a recent push for humanist chaplains in the United States military. Around 13,000 active service members are atheist or agnostic. Here, U.S. Army soldiers bow their heads in prayer during Easter sunrise service at Camp Liberty in Iraq, in 2009.
Marko Drobnjakovic AP

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 5:48 pm

The United States military chaplaincy program has a proud heritage that stretches all the way back to the Continental Army during the American Revolution.

"They are rabbis, ministers, imams and priests who serve our nation's heroes and their families as committed members of the U.S. Army," according to one video produced by the U.S. Army Chaplain Corps.

But are they ready for an atheist chaplain?

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Shots - Health News
3:32 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Parents Grapple With Explaining Cancer To Children

Laura Molina, 9, shows the mask she created expressing the feeling of "sadness." Her mother is being treated for breast cancer at the Lyndon B. Johnson public hospital in Houston.
Carrie Feibel KUHF

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 5:08 pm

Jack Goodman remembers the day his mother, Julie, told the family she had colorectal cancer. He was in seventh grade.

"They just sat us down on the futon in the living room, or the couch that we had, and told us," Jack says. "But I didn't worry because I give it up to God."

His younger sister, Lena, was in fourth grade. She wasn't so easily comforted.

"I was worried. Like she was going to like, maybe die from it, because it's happened to a few people that we know."

Julie Goodman reflects on how hard it was to tell them.

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Parallels
3:32 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Anti-Gay Riot In Tblisi Tests Balance Between Church, State

Anti-gay protesters try to attack a bus with gay activists who are being taken away from a pro-gay-rights rally by police for their own protection in Tblisi, Georgia, on May 17. Thousands of anti-gay protesters, including Orthodox priests, occupied a central street in Georgia's capital.
Shakh Aivazov AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:06 pm

While gay rights have been gaining ground in the West, they've been facing a strong backlash in many countries of the former Soviet Union.

Russia recently passed a law that makes it a crime to give information about "non-traditional sexual relationships" to minors.

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Music
3:32 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

On The Road To Rock Excess: Why The '60s Really Ended In 1973

British rockers Led Zeppelin pose in front of their private plane, dubbed "The Starship," in 1973.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 7:58 am

Author Michael Walker says that by the end of the 1960s, you could fairly say there were two generations of baby boomers: those who had experienced that decade's peace-and-love era of music firsthand, and those who learned about it from their older brothers and sisters.

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U.S.
2:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Where Do Drugs For Lethal Injections Come From? Few Know

A new law in Georgia makes information about where the state got its supply of lethal injection drugs a secret.
Ric Feld AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 4:45 pm

Several states are dealing with a shortage of lethal injection drugs and have had problems getting enough to carry out executions. In Georgia, lawmakers passed a measure that makes information about where the state got its supply a secret.

The Lethal Injection Secrecy Act says that the identity of people or companies that manufacture, supply or prescribe drugs used in executions is a state secret. But attorneys for death row inmate Warren Lee Hill are challenging the state over whether that law is constitutional.

Cruel And Unusual Punishment?

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Africa
2:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Zimbabweans Hope For Fair And Peaceful Presidential Election

A newspaper headline calls for the defeat of Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe on the eve of elections in Zimbabwe on Tuesday in Harare.
AP

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 6:43 pm

Zimbabweans vote for a new president Wednesday, after a violent and disputed election in 2008 and five anxious and turbulent years since.

The much anticipated vote ends a power-sharing deal between veteran leader Robert Mugabe and his main political rival, who is the leading challenger in the presidential race.

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Shots - Health News
2:26 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

Will Obamacare Mean Fewer Jobs? Depends On Whom You Ask

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:43 pm

Of all the contentious claims about the Affordable Care Act, few have been more contentious than over the impact it's having on employers.

It's hard to pick up a newspaper or turn on a television without seeing a story about some boss cutting workers' hours or saying he won't be doing any more hiring because of the health law.

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The Record
11:12 am
Tue July 30, 2013

Maxwell's, The Beloved New Jersey Venue, Closes

Maxwell's, in Hoboken, N.J., hosted Bruce Springsteen, Nirvana and the Replacements, to name a few.
George Kopp

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 3:32 pm

The rock club Maxwell's is a tiny space that's hosted some of the biggest names in music for more than 30 years. R.E.M., Nirvana and many more bands have squeezed onto Maxwell's stage in Hoboken, N.J. Native son Bruce Springsteen recorded the music video for "Glory Days" there.

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Shots - Health News
3:49 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Panel Urges Lung Cancer Screening For Millions Of Americans

Some images of lung cancer are clear cut. But in many others, a nodule on the screen turns out not to be cancer at all.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:24 pm

A federal task force is planning to recommend that millions of smokers and former smokers get a CT scan annually to look for early signs of lung cancer.

The 16-member US Preventive Services Task Force gives that lung cancer screening test a grade of B, which puts it on the same level as mammography for women between the ages of 50 and 74.

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Code Switch
3:49 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

In Nation's First Black Public High School, A Blueprint For Reform

Dunbar High School has a notable list of graduates, including the first black presidential Cabinet member, the first black general in the Army and several of the lawyers who argued the Brown v. Board of Education decision.
Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:26 pm

The nation's first black public high school, Paul Laurence Dunbar High, opened its doors in Washington, D.C., in 1870. But more than 140 years later, Dunbar — like many urban schools — has fallen on hard times. The crumbling, brutalist-style building is often described as a prison, and graduation rates hover around 60 percent.

But it wasn't always that way. Once upon a time, the yearbook read like a Who's Who of black America.

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All Tech Considered
3:40 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

What We're Watching As World's Big Hackers Meet In Las Vegas

Hackers attend the 2011 Def Con conference in Las Vegas. The 2013 conference as well as the Black Hat hacker conference kicks off this week.
Isaac Brekken AP

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

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All Tech Considered
3:02 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Tiny Tech Puts Satellites In Hands Of Homebrew Designers

Joyce Yu-Jean Lee, 33, concentrates on a yellow blinking light during a microprocessor workshop with HacDC.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

Two satellites set for launch Sunday will soon be in the hands of ordinary people because they run on a tiny microchip that anyone can program.

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Law
2:56 pm
Mon July 29, 2013

Legal Battles Over Land Rights, Pipelines Are On The Rise

The Crosstex NGL Pipeline is just one such project in the country that has forced long, unwanted legal battles between oil companies and landowners.
Mose Buchele KUT

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 7:01 pm

At Margaret O'Keefe's farm in East Texas, they grow high-quality Bermuda grass. The fields are flat and vibrant green, surrounded by woods of a darker, richer green. The family loves this land. O'Keefe inherited it from her mother, who divided it among eight children.

"She used to call it 'enchanted valley,' " O'Keefe says.

But her "enchanted valley" also lies in the path of the Crosstex NGL Pipeline.

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The Record
4:26 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

Paying The Piper: Music Streaming Services In Perspective

Thom Yorke of Radiohead and Atoms for Peace is one of many musicians concerned with Spotify's small royalty payments.
isifa Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 2:31 pm

As sales of recorded music continue to plummet, the concept of fans "owning" music may soon be considered old-fashioned. Today, it's all about access to music, rather than ownership of an album or a song, and newer streaming services like Spotify are at the center of the storm.

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Health Care
4:24 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

High-Deductible Health Plans, Gamble For Some, On The Rise

Near the end of last year, a big finance company in Charlotte, N.C., was doing what a lot of other businesses have been doing recently: switching up their health care offerings.

"Everything was changing, and we would only be offered two choices and each were a high-deductible plan," says Marty Metzl, whose husband works for the company.

High-deductible plans are the increasingly common kind of health insurance that have cheaper premiums than traditional plans, but they put you on the hook for thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs before the insurance kicks in.

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Book Reviews
3:39 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

A Touching, 'Telling' Book About Cheese

Michael Paterniti is also the author of Driving Mr. Albert: A Trip Across America with Einstein's Brain.
Joanna Eldredge Morrissey

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 4:24 pm

The first thing you should know: This is not a book about cheese. I mean, it is — and a famous, award-winning cheese at that, a Spanish sheep's milk cheese called the Páramo de Guzmán that cost $22 per pound in 1991. A cheese so good, the king of Spain himself couldn't get enough of it.

But this book is far more about its makers — the cheesemaker himself, an enormous and enormously charming Castilian named Ambrosio, and the book's maker, journalist and author Michael Paterniti, who basically falls in love with Ambrosio at first sight.

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Author Interviews
2:58 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

'Looking For Palestine': A Once-Split Identity Becomes Whole

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 6:46 am

Actress Najla Said is a Palestinian-Lebanese-American Christian, but growing up in New York City, her identity was anything but clearly defined.

The daughter of prominent literary critic Edward Said, she spent her childhood in one of the most influential intellectual households in America. Edward Said, who died in 2003, was a renowned professor at Columbia University and was critical to defining Palestinian independence.

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Music Interviews
2:37 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

AlunaGeorge Finds A Natural Groove, By Accident

George Reid and Aluna Francis have become darlings of the European music festival circuit without releasing an album. Body Talk, their full-length debut as AlunaGeorge, is out Monday.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 1:54 pm

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Science
2:36 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

'Batman' Style: How We Can See With Sound, Too

Echolocation is second nature to animals such as bats and dolphins. Can humans also find their way using sound as a tool?
Ian Waldie Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 9:30 am

Birds do it. Bats do it. Now even educated people do it. Echolocation is the process used by certain animals to identify what lies ahead of them, by emitting sounds that bounce off objects.

Now a team of researchers has created an algorithm that could give the rest of us a chance to see with sound.

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Science
2:34 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

The Rise Of Bloodsucking Insects You Can't Just Swat Away

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 4:24 pm

Steamy days, sultry nights and swarming bugs all make up the thrum of life in the heart of summer. But more and more, our summers are assaulted by the bloodsucking kind of bugs, namely mosquitoes and ticks.

More than a nuisance, new species can impact our health and indicate larger environmental trends.

Beautiful And Adaptable

One relative newcomer prowling the scene is the Asian tiger mosquito. Named for its unique markings, it is black with white stripes.

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U.S.
3:25 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

How Americans Said No To Cocaine After Years-Long Addiction

Narcotics officers in New York seized 3,586 pounds of cocaine and $1.3 million seized in 1997. Cocaine use in the U.S. has dropped by almost half since 2006.
Gino Dominico AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:56 am

In the 1980s, if you moved in certain circles — or picked up the newspaper — a certain white powder was everywhere, common as dust.

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A Blog Supreme
3:25 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

Piano Mastery, Trinidadian Trumpet, Singing Apes: New Jazz

Trumpeter Etienne Charles' new album is called Creole Soul.
Laura Ferreira Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 8:26 am

It's been too long since we simply sat up and pointed out a few of the many new releases worth a set of ears. Luckily, the staff on weekends at All Things Considered thought the same. They invited me to sit down with host Jacki Lyden and play a few cuts for them.

Here's music from an elder statesman of piano, a trumpeter who understands creole music personally, a drummer who writes tunes with a payoff, and a singer in her early 20s with maturity and kick.

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Author Interviews
3:25 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

In 'The Panopticon,' They're Always Watching

During the 19th century, a panopticon was a prison or asylum with an all-seeing eye. Some of the C-shaped prisons with central watchtowers still stand in the U.S. and Europe.

Jenni Fagan's new book borrows the panopticon idea as the setting for a gritty, often poetic, novel. The story is based loosely on Fagan's own experience growing up in the Scottish foster care system for 16 years.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

Handful Of Tracks Propelled J.J. Cale To Big Leagues

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 3:25 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

And as we mentioned earlier in the show, singer-songwriter J.J. Cale has died. If you're not familiar with his name, you've probably heard some of his music. He penned hits from the 1970s and '80s that were recorded by Eric Clapton, Lynyrd Skynyrd and many others. The success of those songs gave him the freedom to release his own albums for more than four decades. NPR's Dan Bobkoff has this remembrance.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CALL ME THE BREEZE")

LYNYRD SKYNYRD: One, two, one, two...

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