91.5 KRCC Music

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Welcome to 91.5 KRCC Music! Check back here often for updates from Vicky, Jeff and the volunteer DJs! We'll have posts from our monthly music show, Air Check, album and concert reviews, announcements about shows we'll be at and more.

Keep up with 91.5 KRCC Music!

Jake Brownell / 91.5 KRCC

If you’ve spent any time in the Broadmoor neighborhood of Colorado Springs, you’ve probably heard a chorus of musical chimes float down Cheyenne Mountain to the valley below.

Ever get the nagging feeling that catastrophic danger is looming and the world could end at any minute? Sure you do, it's 2017! Unsettling as it may be, some would say the only way to get through it is by sticking together. In ODESZA's new, post-apocalyptic, sci-fi music video, that's exactly the takeaway.

"[Bob] Seger's absence from digital services, combined with the gradual disappearance of even physical copies of half his catalog, suggest a rare level of indifference to his legacy," Tim Quirk wrote for NPR Music in late March in his feature, "Where Have All The Bob Seger Albums Gone?"

A Look Back At Monterey Pop, 50 Years Later

Jun 15, 2017

In the 21st century, destination music festivals seem like a dime a dozen. But just 50 years ago, there was only one: the Monterey International Pop Festival, which featured more than 30 artists and bands playing over the course of three days in the summer of 1967.

Monterey Pop set the template for all the huge rock festivals that would follow — Woodstock, Coachella, Bonnaroo and all the rest — and its influence would spread even further via a documentary, Monterey Pop, that was helmed by D.A. Pennebaker and would set a gold standard for concert films.

There are very few artists who can bring the past into the present in a way that captures both the nuance of history and the immediacy of now. But Rhiannon Giddens has done it, beautifully, on her second solo album, Freedom Highway.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify or Apple Music playlist at the bottom of the page.

Hearing ALA.NI sing for just a moment feels like being transported back in time. On her debut album, You & I, the British-born, Paris-based singer's voice evokes greats like Billie Holiday and Judy Garland. But ALA.NI is not one for blindly indulging nostalgia: She's just staying true to the music she's always loved.

The Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, the site of the Woodstock music festival in 1969, has been added to the National Register of Historic Places, according to an announcement on its website. The news was first reported by the Associated Press.

Jake Brownell / 91.5 KRCC

On this episode of Air Check, three more favorite songs from Jeff, Jake and Vicky, a talk with the Denver-based band the Flobots about their musical mission, we have a listen to the swan songs of I Sank Molly Brown during their last live performance as a band at Right Heel Studios, Jake and Jeff investigate the musical history of the Will Rogers Shrine on the side of Cheyenne Mountain, and three must-see concert events of the summer/fall music season. 

When it comes to today's guests, mystery is the name of the game. The band's name is the symbol of a triangle. It's pronounced alt-J. You won't find pictures of the three stars of the band very many places — certainly not on the cover of its new record, which features a drawing of an anonymous red body on the side of a highway. And not in the music video for the album's first single, which stars a scurrying wood mouse.

Southern Rocker Gregg Allman Dies At 69

May 27, 2017

Gregg Allman, founding member of the Allman Brothers Band, has died at the age of 69.

Allman's manager, Michael Lehman, told NPR News Allman had suffered a recurrruence of liver cancer five years ago, and died from complications of the disease.

A statement on the southern rock musician's website reads,

"Gregory LeNoir Allman

December 8, 1947 – May 27, 2017

Singer and multi-instrumentalist Krystle Warren has been compared to artists like Tracy Chapman and Nina Simone. The latter comparison is particularly intriguing: Not only does Warren share that icon's talent for evocative storytelling, but she also lives in France, as Simone once did.

By night, they play gigs. By day, they sample ramen in cities across America.

https://www.seracahoone.com/

Sera Cahoone grew up in Colorado, but has called Seattle home for the better part of two decades. She made a name for herself as a drummer in the band, Band of Horses, and then turned to her own solo career, releasing several albums, including two on Seattle-based Sub Pop records. 

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band turns 50 next week — so what's been done to celebrate one of the greatest records ever? They've remixed the entire album! The word "remix," in fact, may not capture the scope of the project — it's more like someone rebuilt a pyramid with fresh bricks. But a question remains: Why would anyone do so? I traveled to New York to meet Giles Martin, who spearheaded the project, to find that out.

If folk conjures an image in your head, Aldous Harding's Party is that image sieved, sifted and twisted, upended like a rock to show the fat, interesting bugs squiggling beneath it. A dark document of ambition and growth and heartbreak, it's a piece of work that, by design, demands patience.

Like her record, Harding speaks slowly, in deeply considered sentences. In the background as we spoke, birds sang and rain plip-plipped, her chin perched on books as she smoked a cigarette.

Beginning Thursday, May 18, at 12:00 p.m. ET, watch a live stream of the sassy vaudeville duo Nancy And Beth (better known as actors Megan Mullally and Stephanie Hunt) and the pioneering alt-rock band Pixies. They perform as part of this year's Non-Comm convention, held at World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

The show streams live via VuHaus; find approximate set times (listed in Eastern time) below.

Updated at 2:25 p.m. ET

Chris Cornell, the unmistakable voice and frontman of the bands Soundgarden and Audioslave, died overnight in Detroit at the age of 52. He was discovered just past midnight at the MGM Grand Detroit, according to police.

The office of the Wayne County Medical Examiner on Thursday determined the cause of his death to be suicide by hanging, noting that a full autopsy has yet to be completed.

The Youthful Nothings, via Facebook

The stages of a rock 'n' roll career can include: transcending suburban boredom, landing your first paying gig, releasing your debut record, long months on tour, a band break-up or two, periods of self doubt, and, eventually, looking back fondly on your years spent in beloved local bands, while also wondering why you didn't listen to your musician father when he told you it was going to be a hard road.

Rhiannon Giddens' new solo album, Freedom Highway, is an exploration of African-American experiences, accompanied by an instrument with its own uniquely African-American story: the banjo.

Twenty-five years ago Tuesday, a career-defining single was born — and with it, endless sitcom jokes and rap homages. It was referenced in Sing, the 2016 animated children's movie, and in Shrek years before that. But when it debuted in 1992, there were those who took it to heart as an anthem of body positivity.

https://www.seracahoone.com/

This month on Air Check, Sub Pop alumna Sera Cahoone hangs out with Vicky and performs a couple of songs, John Bueno from Pueblo’s Pulp magazine chats with The Brightest Quasar over a cup of coffee, local producer Bill Douglass talks about working with Smashing Pumpkins front man Billy Corgan, and Hannah Fleming explores the many stages of a rock and roll career with Chuck Snow and the Youthful Nothings. 

Colonel Bruce Hampton, guitarist and respected elder statesman of the jam-band community, died Monday night after collapsing on stage during the encore of his own birthday celebration. He was 70 years old.

Blues Under the Bridge
KRCC

On Saturday, July 29th, the 11th Annual 91.5 KRCC Blues Under the Bridge Festival will feature six-time Grammy Award Winners the Blind Boys of Alabama, the Paladins, Bob Corritore and Big Jon Atkinson, Erica Brown with Movers and Shakers, and Mike Clark and Sugarsounds. 

Pre-festival parties will include Jeremy Vasquez and the Survivors on Wednesday, July 26th, the Paladins on Thursday, July 27th, and Bob Corritore on Friday night, July 28th. 

Tickets go on sale Monday, May 1st.

91.5 KRCC member tickets ONLY will be available at the 91.5 KRCC Offices, 912 N Weber St, for $40.

General public tickets will be available at Ivywild Drygoods, and online at Ticketfly.com.  There will be a limited number of VIP seats available for $91.50.

More about the 2017 91.5 KRCC Blues Under the Bridge Festival available here.

One hundred years ago Tuesday, in a working-poor neighborhood of Newport News, Va., a laundress and a shipyard worker had a baby girl. The father soon disappeared, and the mother and child moved north to New York. The mother died. The girl ran away and became one of the most important singers of the 20th century.

Ella Fitzgerald could sing anything: a silly novelty song, like her breakthrough hit, "A-Tisket, A-Tasket." A samba that scatted. A ballad, spooling out like satin.

Carrie Brownstein has made a name for herself as creator and star of Portlandia and as one-third of the beloved riot grrl band Sleater-Kinney, whose seminal album Dig Me Out recently turned 20. But before all that, Brownstein was just another music fan — and as she tells NPR, her local record store, Rubato Records, was the site of an awakening.

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