Bruce Bookout

Looking Up: The Magnificent 7

Dec 11, 2017
Creative Commons / creativecommons.org

This week on Looking Up guest host Bruce Bookout continues our archeo-astronomy lesson on time keeping.

Our calendar has direct ties to astronomy with our count of days as we revolve around the Sun and our count of moonths as the moon goes around the Earth.  The remaining count you might say has a weak relationship to astronomy.

Looking Up: Slippin' Into Darkness...

Aug 7, 2017
nasa.gov

This week on Looking Up Bruce Bookout continues our series of episodes regarding the upcoming total solar eclipse on August 21st, 2017.

We continue our series preparing for the solar eclipse. Let’s take a look at how older cultures viewed this celestial event.

An eclipse is always a disruption of the established order.  Cultures depend on the sun's movement because of its predictability; It is regular, dependable, tamper proof. And then, all of a sudden. . . the sun vanishes into darkness.  

Looking Up: Not So Wile E. While He...

May 29, 2017
earthsky.org

This week on Looking Up guest host Bruce Bookout is back to finish the 2nd part of the Gemini Twins saga.

Rising high in the spring skies of southern Colorado is the constellation of the twins - Gemini.  Look after sunset high in the west for the two bright stars above Orion – Castor and Pollux.  Let’s pair up on last month’s discussion.

Looking Up: Eternal Twins

Apr 24, 2017
Wikipedia / via earthsky.org

This week on Looking Up guest host Bruce Bookout presents our monthly archeo-astronomy talk, this one is on the Gemini Twins.

Rising high in the winter skies of southern Colorado are the twin brothers of the sky - Gemini.  Look after sunset to the south for the two bright stars above Orion – Castor and Pollux.  Let’s double up on our knowledge of these guys.

Looking Up: Mythed Opportunities

Feb 27, 2017
David Lane / nasa.gov

This week on Looking Up Guest host Bruce Bookout presents another archeo-astronomy lesson.  This month it's all about the Pleiades star cluster.

Our Colorado winter skies contain one of the more famous small asterisms of the sky – the Pleiades.  They resemble a tiny dipper and are often confused as the little dipper.  They are easily found by first locating Orion, then moving to the right to the tiny cluster.  They appear as a petite bright cluster of white stars.

Looking Up: The Great Bright Hunter

Jan 23, 2017
evilestmark / openclipart.org

This week on Looking Up guest host Bruce Bookout presents this month's archeo-astronomy lesson  on Orion.

Rising high in the winter skies of southern Colorado is the great hunter of the sky - Orion.  Look after sunset to the east for three bright stars in a row surrounded by a rectangle of four other bright stars.  Let’s hunt through the world on Orion’s legend.

Looking Up: Long Night's Journey Into Day

Dec 19, 2016
by Kumar / http://freecoloringpages4uer.blogspot.com

This week on Looking Up guest host Bruce Bookout sheds light on the longest night of the year and how it's celebrated by other cultures.  

Our Colorado nights are getting deep and as we get to the longest night of the year every culture celebrates the winter solstice differently.  Solstice comes from latin, meaning “the sun” and “to stand still”. Because the winter solstice is also an event that marks the return of the sun’s presence in the sky, it has been connected with renewal, birth, sun gods, and life-death-rebirth deities. There are traditional celebrations that give people hope sunny days lay ahead.

Looking Up: Casio Watch

Nov 28, 2016
Rogelio Bernal Andreo (Deep Sky Colors) / nasa

This week on Looking Up guest host Bruce Bookout regales us with various mythologies surrounding the queen of the night sky, Cassiopeia.

Rising high in the autumn skies of Southern Colorado is the reigning queen of the sky - Cassiopeia.  Take a look after sunset to the northeast for a pattern of stars resembling a “W”. 

Looking Up: Bear Witness

Aug 29, 2016
VegaStar Carpentier / NASA

This week Bruce gives us different cultural perspectives on the constellation Ursa Major (the Big Dipper).

The skies of Southern Colorado were not always seen the same way as we do in modern times. If you take look at our evening skies this week to the northwest after sunset, you will see the familiar group of stars known as the Big Dipper.  The Big Dipper is an asterism contained in the constellation Ursa Major – the greater she-bear. 

My Very Educated Mother Just Served

Jul 25, 2016
Eliot-Herman-Tucson-AZ / earthsky.org

This week Bruce enumerates on the planets currently visible in our night sky.  

As residents of Southern Colorado we are afforded a spectacular view  for the next several weeks of six naked eye planets in our evening skies. Starting shortly after sunset you can tour the original planets known to our ancient ancestors.