cannabis

Ali Budner / 91.5 KRCC

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell may seem like an unlikely champion for an illegal substance, but the Kentucky Republican just added the legalization of marijuana’s non-psychoactive cousin, hemp, to the Senate farm bill. The industrial hemp business is increasingly seen as an economic savior and substitute for vulnerable industries like mining, especially in Colorado, the first state in the nation to make hemp legal at the state level.

Teri Verbickis / Creative Commons 4.0

This month, Colorado became the first state in the nation to allow school nurses to administer medical marijuana to students. But not all nurses may be on board.

Ali Budner / 91.5 KRCC

It's officially Hemp History Week. The U.S. Senate unanimously passed a resolution that recognizes the “full growth potential of the industrial hemp industry.” But at the state level, real progress for the hemp industry is still all over the map.

As more states legalize marijuana, there's growing interest in a cannabis extract — cannabidiol, also known as CBD.

It's marketed as a compound that can help relieve anxiety — and, perhaps, help ease aches and pains, too.

Part of the appeal, at least for people who don't want to get high, is that CBD doesn't have the same mind-altering effects as marijuana, since it does not contain THC, the psychoactive component of the plant.

Recently, Mason Jar Event Group hosted their winter cannabis pairing dinner at art gallery Boulder Creative Collective. Chef Jamey Fader, executive chef at Lola in Denver, cranked out courses while attendees enjoyed marijuana bud, concentrate and edible products from featured sponsors. Talking to the Report, Mason Jar made it clear the dinner’s are a unique opportunity to bring first-timers and aficionados together to appreciate cuisine and Colorado cannabis the way it is intended, in a group setting.

courtesy Colorado State University - Pueblo

The new Institute of Cannabis Research at Colorado State University Pueblo recently launched with about $1.1 million in state and local funding.

Kristen Wyatt / Associated Press

Three varieties of industrial hemp seed are the first to attain certification from the state for widespread use.  They meet the requirements to produce mature plants with less than 0.3% THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana.