labor

Friday Newscast, 2/5/16, 7:04 AM

Feb 5, 2016

Newscast for Friday, February 5, 2016, 7:04 AM:
 


Friday Newscast, 1/29/16, 7:04 AM

Jan 29, 2016

Newscast for Friday, January 29, 2016, 7:04 AM:
 


Monday Newscast, 1/4/16, 5:32 PM

Jan 4, 2016

Newscast for Monday, January 4, 2016, 5:32 PM:
 

Friday Newscast, 10/16/15, 5:32 PM

Oct 16, 2015

Newscast for Friday, October 16, 2015, 5:32 PM:
 

This episode of Wish We Were Here was originally broadcast in November of 2014  

On April 20th, 1914, just north of Trinidad, Colorado, one of the bloodiest, most overlooked events in the history of the American labor movement set the stage for creation of the 8-hour workday, the weekend, and the right of workers to organize.

100 years later, we remember the Ludlow Massacre and its legacy. With the help of former Colorado Poet Laureate David Mason, and a host of historians, archeologists, economists, and musicians, we remember this pivotal moment in American history. 

Jodene Parlapiano

This Sunday marks the 100th anniversary of one of the most deadly days in labor history -- the Ludlow Massacre. Southern Colorado coal miners went on strike for safer working conditions in September of 1913.  It ultimately led to violent conflict between the miners and the companies they worked for. On that day in April a century ago,  21 people died - including women and children.