Jake Brownell / KRCC

The year after the end of the Civil War, the U.S. Congress authorized the creation of six segregated African American army regiments. They were placed in the largely unsettled Rocky Mountain West, far from the southern states where many of them had been enslaved. More than 150 people attended a ceremony Thursday to commemorate this piece of Western history.

Jake Brownell / KRCC


Thursday marks the 150th anniversary of the creation of the so-called Buffalo Soldier regiments of the U.S. Army. The segregated units, composed of African-American men, were formed just a year after the end of the Civil War, and played a role in the establishment of the American West. A local group has spent the last two years working to honor the soldiers and their contributions to American history.  

Holly Pretsky / KRCC

More than 100 Colorado Springs community members gathered together Saturday night in Memorial Park for a vigil following the recent deaths of Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, and five Dallas police officers.

Holly Pretsky / KRCC

Law enforcement leaders and others in Colorado Springs and El Paso County held a press conference today in response to incidents of violence across the country this week and in the past, including the shootings in Dallas last night that left five officers dead.


Tuesday at 7pm, Colorado College will host a conversation between authors Helen Thorpe and Jeff Hobbs. Helen Thorpe’s writing has appeared in the New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Slate, and elsewhere, and her books—Soldier Girls, and Just Like Us—have been widely praised by critics. Jeff Hobbs is the author of The Tourists: A Novel, and more recently, the New York Times bestseller, The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace. In advance of their upcoming talk, Thorpe interviewed Hobbs for KRCC about his book, which explores issues of race, class, and social inequality, through the life and untimely death of Hobbs’ good friend and college roommate.

For more information on the event, which is free to the public and will take place in Gaylord Hall on the Colorado College campus, click HERE.

Wednesday Newscast, 10/28/15, 5:32 PM

Oct 28, 2015

Newscast for Wednesday, October 28, 2015, 5:32 PM:

On this episode of Wish We Were Here, we bring you the story of Ron Stallworth. In the 1970s, he became the first black detective ever to serve in the Colorado Springs Police Department. He's also the author of Black Klansman, a memoir about one of his most memorable investigations, which you'll hear about in this episode.

Music in this episode is mostly from the amazing Free Music Archive. You'll hear pieces by Lee Rosevere, Sarin, Podington Bear, Deadly Combo, Chris Zabriski, Kevin McLeod, Antony Raijekov, and All Shall Be Well. You'll also hear music by the Budos Band.

On the evening of June 17th, a young white man opened fire on a group of black churchgoers after bible study at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, SC, killing nine people.

Stephen Sartori

Celebrated novelist Zadie Smith will speak tonight from 7 to 9 p.m. in Armstrong Hall. Winner of numerous awards, Smith is the author of the novels “White Teeth,” “The Autograph Man,” “On Beauty,” and, most recently, “NW.” This event is part of the 2014 MacLean Symposium on Globalization, Culture, and Literature. Colorado College Professor Heidi Lewis spoke with Smith by phone.

For more information, click HERE.

Off Topic: Race, Racism, and White Privilege

Aug 5, 2013


Despite the long history of racism, white supremacy, and racial violence in this country--and despite the progress that has been made in combating the worst and most glaring examples of it--Americans still have a very difficult time speaking candidly about the contemporary realities of race in our society. However, In the wake of events such as the recent not guilty verdict in the George Zimmerman - Trayvon Martin case, it becomes urgently clear that we need to have real, substantive conversations about the undeniable effects of inequality in the United States.