Andrea Chalfin / KRCC

Colorado Springs residents can expect to see road repairs taking place after ballot measure 2C was approved with 65% of the vote. 

The measure allows for a .62% sales tax increase to go toward road maintenance, and is expected to draw around 50 million dollars a year in revenue.

Mayor John Suthers said he plans to appoint a five person advisory committee to review progress, and added that the Public Works Department will issue occasional updates.

Sample Ballot / El Paso County Clerk & Recorder

The highest profile item on this year's ballot in Colorado Springs is Issue 2C. The mayor and city council are proposing a .62% increase in the sales tax to help pay for road repairs. Opponents of the tax say there's enough money already in the city's budget.

The proposed tax increase is estimated to add $50 million dollars a year, in each of the next five years, to the road repair fund. And, according to Councilwoman Jill Gaebler, the extra money is needed because the city has fallen behind. She says part of the problem is a lack of funding and part is the city's growth.

Local tax and spending issues, as well as city council and mayoral races largely dominate Colorado's 2015 election. There is only one statewide question, which asks voters whether the state can keep marijuana tax money it's already collected to pay for school construction, law enforcement and other programs.

If that's a question that sounds familiar – that's because it is. Proposition BB will actually be the third time Colorado voters have weighed in on taxing marijuana.

Thursday Newscast, 9/24/15, 5:32 PM

Sep 24, 2015

Newscast for Thursday, September 24, 2015, 5:32 PM:

Tuesday Newscast, 9/22/15, 5:32 PM

Sep 22, 2015

Newscast for Tuesday, September 22, 2015, 5:32 PM:

A group opposing a proposed sales tax measure for road repairs in Colorado Springs has launched its campaign.

The ballot initiative, if passed, would institute a sales tax increase of approximately $50 million a year for five years to help pay for road repairs.

Laura Carno is spearheading the opposition, and says the city could be more efficient and find alternative ways to pay for the repairs.

Wednesday Newscast, 9/16/15, 5:32 PM

Sep 16, 2015

Newscast for Wednesday, September 16, 2015, 5:32 PM:

Tuesday Newscast, 9/1/15, 5:32 PM

Sep 1, 2015

Newscast for Tuesday, September 1, 2015, 5:32 PM:

Wednesday Newscast, 8/26/15, 5:32 PM

Aug 26, 2015

Newscast for Wednesday, August 26, 2015, 5:32 PM:

Colorado Springs City Council gave preliminary approval to place two measures on November's ballot that would benefit roads and parks. 

Mayor John Suthers formally presented his proposals at Tuesday's council meeting, one of which will ask residents for a .62% sales tax increase for road repairs.  It would sunset in five years and generate around $50 million each year.

Critics say that money can be found in the existing budget, but Suthers says that's just not realistic.

Tuesday Newscast, 07/14/15, 5:32 PM

Jul 14, 2015

Newscast for Tuesday, 7/14/15, 05:32

Bente Birkeland / RMCR

As a result of Colorado's booming oil production, energy companies are paying more in severance taxes – money they pay the state for taking minerals out of the ground. Half of it is supposed to go to back to local communities, both directly and through grants. But thanks to market forces and political conditions in Denver, it's not always a stable source of funding.


As they prepare to write the annual budget, there's mixed news for Colorado lawmakers. The latest revenue forecast shows the economy will remain strong, but there is a lot of uncertainty going forward, especially when it comes to low oil prices and how it ripples through the state's economy.


Colorado’s legislative session wrapped up with a quiet final day, as lawmakers put the finishing touches on several bills and gave tributes to outgoing members. And as Bente Birkeland reports, one of the least controversial measures passed after last minute negotiations.

The market for legal recreational marijuana in Colorado is booming, and the state is expecting millions of dollars more in tax revenues that initially projected. That has lawmakers grappling with the best way to spend all of that additional cash.


Gay and lesbian couples who are legally married in another state may soon be able to file a joint tax return in Colorado. Birkeland has more from the state capitol.

Colorado voters support taxing recreational marijuana, but gave a crushing defeat to a proposed billion-dollar tax increase for public schools. In this special election edition of Capitol Conversation, Bente Birkeland analyzes the long- term impacts of the election results with political reporters.

Colorado voters gave a mixed reaction at the ballot box on a pair of statewide tax increases during yesterday’s election. As Bente Birkeland reports, voters didn’t want to tax themselves to pay for education, but were overwhelmingly willing to tax recreational marijuana to help rebuild schools.

Supporters of Amendment 66 waged a vigorous get out the vote campaign flush with outside money from the likes of Bill Gates and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

It wasn’t enough to convince voters to say “yes.”

Education Campaign Kicks Off

Aug 5, 2013

Supporters of a tax increase for K-12 schools turned in petitions today to try and get the measure on the November ballot. They submitted twice the amount required by law. Bente Birkeland has more from the state capitol.

Education Tax Ballot Initiative

Aug 2, 2013

A roughly billion-dollar education tax increase is likely to go before voters this fall. It’s part of a larger package of education reforms state lawmakers passed last session. Bente Birkeland talks to supporters about the challenges ahead, and how they hope the initiative won’t meet the same fate as a similar proposal.