wildlife

Jason Turner / Photo courtesy: Pueblo Nature and Raptor Center

A member of the endangered California condor species was found far from home in a backyard near Colorado Springs.  The large bird was taken to the Nature and Raptor Center of Pueblo after being picked up by the Ellicott Wildlife Rehabilitation Center and transported via Colorado Parks and Wildlife volunteers.

Diana Miller, director of the Pueblo Nature and Raptor Center, said the bird was in good condition, despite being a little thin.

It was sent Tuesday morning to the Peregrine Fund in Arizona to be reintroduced into the wild.

Sally King / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A new study released by the U.S. Geological Survey looks at the effects of climate change on certain species in the American Southwest.  KRCC’s Eliza Densmore reports.
 

The study focuses on twelve bird and reptile species in the southwest and how they’re expected to endure changes in breeding ranges and habitats.

Recent budgetary shortfalls have forced Colorado Parks and Wildlife to end the Big Game Access Program. KRCC’s Rachel Gonchar reports.
 

The Big Game Access Program, or BGAP, was intended to evaluate the potential of landowners leasing properties in southeastern Colorado to allow for big game hunting.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife spokeswoman Abbie Walls says she’s unsure of what the budget shortfall means to the future of BGAP.

The Colorado Parks and Wildlife commission talked drones at their meeting last week in Lamar. As KRCC’s Maggie Spencer reports, any potential vote won’t happen until next year.
 

The Commission is looking ahead with regards to the use of drones in hunting. Spokesman Randy Hampton says they’ve not seen it in the field yet, but the commission is looking to implement proactive regulation.

The use of drones to help hunt wildlife may soon be illegal.  KRCC’s Eliza Densmore reports.
 

The use of unmanned aerial vehicles to help locate and kill game is not regulated, but the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission is expected to take up the issue before the practice becomes popular.

Director of the Colorado Outfitters Association Dick Ray says he sees the possible move as proactive and that drones take away from the true purpose of hunting.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Colorado Parks and Wildlife has selected 18 wetland restoration projects around the state to receive a total of $700,000 in grant money. KRCC’s Eliza Densmore reports on two in southern Colorado.

The East Plum Creek restoration project near Castle Rock is receiving $50,000 to help with bank widening, revegetation, and erosion prevention and another $12,400 will go to the Dinosaur Island Trench Project west of Lamar.