Get to Know the Candidates for Colorado Springs City Council

Ballots are out for the 2017 municipal election in Colorado Springs, and all six City Council districts are in play.  91.5 KRCC sat down with the candidates, and our interviews can be heard in their entirety below. Before you vote, learn where the candidates in your district stand on issues ranging from taxes to infrastructure to their hopes for the future of Colorado Springs.

Official election day is April 4.

Didn't get a ballot or need to know more about how to vote? Visit the city's FAQ site.

Andrea Chalfin / 91.5 KRCC

Left-of-center candidates made out well in this month's Colorado Springs City Council election. Progressive favorites Richard Skorman, Yolanda Avila, and Jill Gaebler beat their more conservative challengers, and left-leaning David Geislinger was elected following an unopposed campaign. Together, along with at-large representative Bill Murray, these four could comprise a new, more liberal majority on Colorado Springs City Council. 

Andrea Chalfin / 91.5 KRCC

The ballots have been cast and the results are coming in. Numbers indicate a near 32% voter turnout across the city.   Current as of 12:53 AM (Wed):

Laura Bittner / Flickr/Creative Commons

Colorado Springs city elections are on April 4th. In addition to all six city council districts, there are three questions on the ballot.

Here's some information on those issues:

Colorado Springs City Council District 6 is the smallest council district by population, but the biggest geographically. It encompasses large swaths of undeveloped land on the city's east side, including the Banning Lewis Ranch property, as well as the Colorado Springs Airport, Peterson Air Force Base, and the northeastern neighborhoods of Stetson Hills, Ridgeview, Norwood, Old Farm and more. The district is poised for a lot of new development, which was a recurring theme in our conversations with candidates for the District 6 city council seat.

City of Colorado Springs

Colorado Springs City Council District 5 lies in the center of Colorado Springs. It's home to the Olympic Training Center, Palmer Park, the old North End, and the Knob Hill neighborhood.

Incumbent Jill Gaebler is facing a challenge from Lynette Crow-Iverson.

The City of Colorado Springs

Colorado Springs City Council District 4 is in the southern part of the city, bound by Powers on the east, Platte to the north, and encompassing the southern part of Circle Drive.

There are three people vying for the seat, including incumbent Helen Collins.  Collins declined to be interviewed for this piece.  Her challengers, in the order they appear on the ballot, are Yolanda Avila and Deborah Hendrix.

Coloradosprings.gov

Colorado Springs City Council District 3 comprises the Westside, Downtown, the Broadmoor, Cheyenne Canyon and the Nevada Ave/HWY 115 corridor spanning south to Fort Carson. Councilman Keith King has represented the district for the last four years, but decided not to run for reelection, leaving an open contest for his vacated seat. 

The City of Colorado Springs

District 2 in Colorado Springs is located in the northernmost part of the city.  It borders the Air Force Academy, moves north past Interquest Parkway, and hits the eastern border at a portion of Powers and Black Forest Roads.  Current seat-holder Larry Bagley is not seeking re-election, and the district has only one candidate. 

The City of Colorado Springs

District 1 in Colorado Springs is situated northwest of downtown.  It borders the Air Force Academy and contains Garden of the Gods and the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs.

Incumbent Don Knight, retired from the Air Force and defense industry, is facing a challenge from local businessman Greg Basham.  91.5 KRCC sat down with Knight and Basham separately to talk with them about the challenges facing their district and the city, taxes, and their visions for Colorado Springs.