Local Programs

Local programming.

Close Encounters

Jun 29, 2015
NASA

This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

A rare and remarkable thing is going to happen in Southern Colorado skies tomorrow, June 30th, and you have a front row seat to watch it happen.

"VEGA - 4 1/2 Stars" - says Carl Sagan

Jun 22, 2015
en.wikipedia.org

  This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

There is a very bright star in the southern Colorado skies right now that you may have visited or read about, at least in science fiction stories, the star Vega! 

Vega has been visited by Capt. Kirk in Star Trek, and most famously as the location of an alien civilization’s transportation hub in both the book and the movie Contact.

Heart of the Scorpion

Jun 15, 2015
earthsky.org

  This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

Did you know that there is a time bomb waiting to go off in the night sky right now? And it’s a big one – the supergiant star Antares! 

Glamorous Glob

Jun 8, 2015
NASA

  

  This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

Did you know that you have a planetarium in your pocket? If you have a smart phone, you have the universe at your fingertips. 

There are wonderful and free interactive sky maps available for both iPhone and Android users. You can use these programs to find interesting things in the sky by simply holding your phone over your head and letting it guide you to some of the wonders of our universe.

Another Mooningless Title..

Jun 1, 2015
NASA

This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

The planet Saturn has 67 known moons, more than any other planet in the solar system so far. Two of the most interesting are the biggest, Titan, and one of the smallest, Enceladus.

Titan is the second largest moon in the solar system, and is even larger than the planet Mercury. Titan is bright enough to be seen in relatively small telescopes.

Furiously Fast

May 25, 2015
NASA

  This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

The absolute favorite of many astronomers is visible in the sky right now, the planet Saturn. It is hard to express how beautiful Saturn is through a telescope, so you really do want to come to one of our public star parties and take a peek. Saturn’s beauty will take your breath away. It has rings!

Spike to Spica

May 18, 2015
nasa

  This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

A few episodes ago we talked about the star Arcturus, and how you could find it by following the curve of the handle of the Big Dipper across the sky. Today let’s talk about what happens if you keep following that same curve past Arcturus. You can speed on, to Spica

Regal Regulus

May 11, 2015
clipart.com

  This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

As you look up in the southern Colorado sky, did you know that you can see a lion? 

Size Doesn't Matter When You're This Hot!

May 4, 2015
M. Procell

  This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

There is a planet in our solar system that is close enough to us, and bright enough, to be easily seen, yet very few people have actually seen it. Can you guess which one it is? 

It’s Mercury, the closest planet to the sun. And it is that closeness that makes Mercury so hard to spot.

Don't ya know... it's time to change.

Apr 29, 2015
Kurt M. Bunch www.shugas.com

Change is good!  Thank you to the 1100 plus of our friends, old and new, who have already contributed to KRCC's Spring Membership Drive.

If you haven't had a chance to donate yet, we still need your help.  Jeff usually complains about "humpin' ice around" at our concerts.  Let's make him complain about humpin' even more of your cash around instead!

Arc to Arcturus

Apr 27, 2015
NASA

  This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

Did you know that in 1933, the light from a star was used to turn on the lights at the Chicago World’s Fair? 

KRCC Wins Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards

Apr 23, 2015
www.trdna.org

KRCC learned today that we received two Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for work produced by KRCC News Director Andrea Chalfin and Noel Black and Jake Brownell, producers of KRCC's program Wish We Were Here.  

KRCC has been a part of life in the Pikes Peak region and southern Colorado/northern New Mexico for almost 65 years. From vinyl to digital, car stereos to smart phones, we've continued to meet the times head on while bringing you the diverse, quality programming and events that enrich your life.  While we always ask members their three favorite programs, we invite all listeners to take this comprehensive survey to help us make the critical programming and events decisions that will shape KRCC in the years to come. Thank you!

Wobbly Pole Dancer

Apr 20, 2015
clipart.com

This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

If you had to pick the most important star to humans in the northern hemisphere over the past few thousand years, which star would you pick? I don’t think there is much doubt it would be Polaris, the pole star.

Polaris is very near due north for anyone north of the equator. As such, it has been a vital navigational aid for everything from ships at sea to escaped slaves before the Civil War, seeking a path north to freedom.

Bear Asterism

Apr 13, 2015
clipart.com

  This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

The best known grouping of stars for most of us is the Big Dipper. This collection of stars in the northern sky looks like, well, a big dipper, with a long handle and a scoop up front. 

TWO FOR ONE - Sirius

Apr 6, 2015
clipart.com

  This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal  Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

Umbral-ievable

Mar 30, 2015
Mike Procell

  This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Jim West, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

This coming Saturday, April 4th, we get to see one of the more rare events in the night sky – a total lunar eclipse. 

Andromeda... coming soon!!!

Mar 23, 2015
Allan Runyan

This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!   On a clear day in Southern Colorado you can see for miles, to Pikes Peak, the Spanish Peaks and beyond. But have you ever wondered what is the most distant thing you can see with your naked eye?The answer is up in the western sky right now – the Andromeda Galaxy!

Milky Way Cool...

Mar 16, 2015
M. Procell

This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

Where do you live? Often there are several ways to answer that question. Your street, your city, your state and more. Where we live in the Universe is the same kind of thing. We live on Earth, which revolves around the sun as part of our solar system. But our sun is one of approximately 200 BILLION stars that make up our galaxy, the Milky Way. 

Moon Half Full Or Half Empty?

Mar 9, 2015
photo by Mike Procell

This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up in the night’s sky!

If I asked you to guess where you can take a walk and know that your footprints will last for a very long time, what would you guess?

If you guessed the surface of the moon, you’d be right! The moon is the only place in the universe, other than the Earth, where humans have walked. Because there is no wind or rain on the Moon, the footprints left by the Apollo astronauts will last for millions of years!

Better Call Sol

Mar 2, 2015
M. Procell

This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up!

Astronomers use telescopes to look at distant stars. But how big a telescope do you think you would need to be able to see the closest star to us here on the Earth? 

Okay, it’s a trick question – the answer is none! Our own sun is the closest star to us. And while it is about 93 million miles away, astronomically speaking that is right next door!

Radio Colorado College is pleased to introduce KRCC PRESENTS, a new weekly time slot dedicated to original programming produced right here in the Pikes Peak Region. Beginning this week, tune every Friday at 7pm and every Sunday at 4pm to catch an episode of one of three new KRCC shows:

Jupiter Ascending

Feb 23, 2015
clipart.com

This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal 

  Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up in the night sky!

If you look to the east an hour or two after sunset, you will see something shining brilliantly in the eastern sky – the planet Jupiter! In fact, Jupiter is the 4th brightest thing in the sky, after the sun, the moon, and the planet Venus.

Walking on Venus

Feb 16, 2015
clipart.com

This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up in the night sky!

Orion the Mighty Hunter

Feb 9, 2015
clipart.com

This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up in the night sky right now.

Of the 88 constellations in our sky, one of the brightest and easiest to find is also the most prominent in the winter sky – The constellation Orion

Orion is supposed to look like a mighty hunter, but to most people it looks a lot like a capital letter H. Orion, and the area around it, contains some of the brightest stars in the sky and some amazing other deep sky objects.

Comet Lovejoy

Feb 4, 2015
clipart.com

This is “Looking UP! in southern Colorado,” from the Colorado Springs Astronomical Society. I’m Hal Bidlack, and there are lots of reasons to look up in the night sky right now.

Noel Black

At an old prison in southeastern Colorado, an experimental new program is working to help chronically homeless people from around the state rebuild their lives. In episode 3 of Wish We Were Here, we tell the story of Fort Lyon, and ask whether it could be the beginning of the end of homelessness as we know it. 

Want more from Wish We Were Here? Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes HERE, and automatically get all the latest episodes and extras as they come out.

In the second episode of Wish We Were Here, we featured abridged excerpts of David Mason's excellent verse-novel, Ludlow. In this series of Wish We Were Here Extras, we bring you the full, unabridged text of Ludlow, as read by David Mason himself. 

Click HERE to listen to part one of Ludlow.  

Click HERE to listen to part two of Ludlow.

In the second episode of Wish We Were Here, we featured abridged excerpts of David Mason's excellent verse-novel, Ludlow. In this series of Wish We Were Here Extras, we bring you the full, unabridged text of Ludlow, as read by David Mason himself. 

Click HERE to listen to part one of Ludlow.  

Click HERE to listen to part two of Ludlow.

In the second episode of Wish We Were Here, we featured abridged excerpts of David Mason's excellent verse-novel, Ludlow. In this series of Wish We Were Here Extras, we bring you the full, unabridged text of Ludlow, as read by David Mason himself. 

Click HERE to listen to part one of Ludlow.  

Click HERE to listen to part two of Ludlow.

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