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California Gov. Jerry Brown has denied parole to former Charles Manson follower Leslie Van Houten, 66, who is serving a life sentence for her part in the cult's notorious killing spree in Los Angeles in 1969.

In April, a California parole panel had recommended that Van Houten — the youngest of the cult leader's so-called family — be granted parole after decades of good behavior in prison, as we reported.

Appearing on stage together for the first time since Friday's vice presidential announcement, Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine made a push for voters of color by highlighting his record on diversity and civil rights.

Kaine also spoke about gun violence, job creation, equal pay and raising equal pay — all mainstays of Clinton's campaign.

Clinton said Kaine has "lived" the values of diversity. That, she argued, is in contrast the GOP ticket and last week's Republican National Convention. "Tim Kaine is everything Donald Trump and Mike Pence are not," she said.

A 65-year-old Russian adventurer has piloted a balloon around the world solo and non-stop in 11 days, claiming a new world record.

If the record is confirmed, Fedor Konyukhov has shaved a full two days off the previous record set by American adventurer Steve Fossett in 2002. The World Air Sports Federation, which makes the determination, congratulated Konukhov and said it was waiting for an official claim to ratify the record.

Hillary Clinton has chosen Tim Kaine to be her vice presidential running mate. The Virginia senator has been an elected official — including mayor, governor and senator — for over 20 years and was once the chairman of the Democratic National Committee. He was also on President Obama's shortlist of running mates in 2008.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

An attack on a protest march by Afghanistan's minority Hazara community in Kabul has killed dozens of people.

Afghan authorities said that at least 80 people were killed and 231 were injured in the attack, according to The Associated Press and Reuters.

For These Cosplayers, Geeky Costumes Are The Cat's Pajamas

6 hours ago

This weekend, San Diego will be invaded by comic book characters, all 12 Doctor Who doctors and lots of Lycra. The normal sights of Comic-Con International weekend, of course. Many enthusiastic Comic-Con-goers opt to dress in cosplay — for the uninitiated, that's a mashup of the words "costume" and "play" — inserting themselves into their favorite stories.

Meanwhile, two cosplayers in Seattle are avoiding the San Diego heat, staying at home instead and refining their art.

The suspect in the attack on a shopping mall in Munich on Friday is an 18-year-old German-Iranian high school student who lived in Munich and had a history of depression, Munich police said. The shooting rampage left at least 10 people dead, including the alleged attacker, and 27 injured, according to police.

The Uppermost Aristocracy of the Hoverfly Society

7 hours ago

You may have seen a hoverfly before. You also may have mistaken it for something else — a bee, or a wasp. They are masters of mimicry, imitating more dangerous insects to avoid predators.

Fredrik Sjöberg is not fooled by these disguises. He's spent the last thirty years hunting for hoverflies, and can distinguish between species based on tiny differences in antennae color or wing shape.

Sjöberg is an amateur entomologist, but a committed one.

"You want to know something that no one else knows," he explains, "you want to become the real expert."

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Eleven U.S. Army soldiers are headed to the Summer Olympics in Brazil next month on a mission that doesn't have anything to do with security. They're all U.S. Olympians, including some who only recently became American citizens.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the#NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

Limericks

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Lightning Fill In The Blank

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Prediction

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The NPR Politics team was on the road this week, bringing you stories from the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Math is "contemptible and vile."

That's not from a disgruntled student. It's from a textbook.

The author, 16th century mathematician Robert Recorde, nestled the line just after his preface, table of contents and a biblical quote citing God's command to measure and number all things.

Recorde didn't believe in math's awfulness — quite the opposite. He was simply reflecting popular opinion on his way to a spirited defense of math. Why?

Fran Beesley was still in her bathrobe early one morning in June when she emerged from her home to find a Japanese family taking photos of her flowerbeds.

She lives in a 1970s-style one-story bungalow in the rural village of Kidlington, about a 90-minute drive northwest of London. It's a quiet place. Doesn't get many visitors. Beesley is retired and cares for her invalid husband. They're both in their 70s.

What are the biggest social and economic problems the world faces today? And how close are we to ending them?

Those are the questions that the U.N. Economic and Social Council aims to answer in its first report on the Sustainable Development Goals, released this past week.

The SDGs, as they're known, are 17 global goals to end extreme poverty, fight inequality and tackle climate change by 2030. The U.N.'s member states approved them last September.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is promising a military shake-up after last week's failed coup attempt. More than 7,000 soldiers are already in custody, including nearly 100 generals.

Turks were thrilled to see last Friday's coup effort thwarted, but some are wondering if the armed forces are in any condition to deal with the many challenges facing the country — fighting the Islamic State, battling Kurdish militants and managing chaotic borders with Iraq and Syria.

When you're pregnant, going to the doctors can be exciting. You get to find out if you're having a boy or a girl. Maybe hear the baby's heart beat.

But in southern Africa, many women find out something else.

Sociologist Alison Groves recently ran a study in a town outside Durban, South Africa. They followed about 1,500 pregnant women. The results left her speechless.

While many pundits and political observers were quick to praise Hillary Clinton's pick of Tim Kaine as her running mate on Friday, the choice wasn't met with universal acclaim.

One important group — progressives and backers of Clinton's former rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders — were not as pleased with the selection of the Virginia senator who has cultivated a reputation of working across the aisle over the course of his political career.

"My name is Becki," says a young woman standing in a convention center turned comic book bazaar. Then she flips a mane of orange hair and launches into Scottish accent. "And today, I am Merida from Brave."

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