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11:30 am
Wed September 4, 2013

From McDermott, An Extraordinary Story Of An Ordinary 'Someone'

The main character of Alice McDermott's Someone grew up in 1920s and '30s New York.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 1:27 pm

Endurance, going the distance, sucking up the solitude and the brine: I'm not talking about the glorious Diana Nyad and her instantly historic swim from Cuba to Key West, but of the ordinary heroine whose life is the subject of Alice McDermott's latest novel, Someone. "Ordinary" is a word that's used a lot to describe McDermott's characters, mostly Irish and working class, mostly un-heroic in any splashy way.

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The Two-Way
11:24 am
Wed September 4, 2013

As Pentagon Adds Bombing Options, Kerry Warns Assad

As Secretary of State John Kerry spoke to the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Wednesday, "Code Pink" protesters behind him held up "bloody hands" to express their opposition to the prospect of U.S. military strikes on Syria.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

"We are not asking America to go to war," Secretary of State John Kerry told the House Foreign Affairs Committee early Wednesday afternoon, as he and other top administration officials continued to push Congress to support President Obama's call for military strikes aimed at the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

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Parallels
11:14 am
Wed September 4, 2013

'We Are Next': Greek Jews Fear Rise Of Far-Right Party

Mois Yussuroum, a 94-year-old retired dentist, fought the Nazis as part of the Greek resistance during World War II. "Of the 650 Greek Jews who fought in the resistance, I'm the only one still alive," he says.
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:22 pm

No one has ever doubted Mois Yussuroum's patriotism. As part of the Greek resistance during World War II, he fought Benito Mussolini's fascist army and then the Nazis.

"The other resistance fighters didn't know I was Jewish," he says, since he used the name "Yiorgos Gazis" in case he was captured. "But my superiors did know, and they gave me many responsibilities, including making me a garrison commander."

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U.S.
11:04 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Program Fights Gun Violence Bravado With 'Story Of Suffering'

Dr. Amy Goldberg explains the medical treatment Adams received after he was shot. Part of her demonstration involves placing stickers on a student volunteer to mark bullet entry and exit points.
Courtesy Jessica Kourkounis

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 3:06 pm

In 2004, 16-year-old Lamont Adams was shot more than a dozen times near his home in North Philadelphia. He was taken to Philadelphia's Temple University Hospital, where trauma unit head Dr. Amy Goldberg fought to save his life. Goldberg lost that battle and Lamont died shortly after arriving at the hospital, but after treating so many gun injuries and watching so many victims die, Goldberg decided to make a change.

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Lights Out In Venezuela; President Blames Opposition Saboteurs

Fans wait for play to resume Tuesday at a FIBA World Cup qualifying basketball game in Caracas, Venezuela. A blackout left about 70 percent of the country without electricity.
Ariana Cubillos AP

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 3:57 pm

Venezuela's President Nicholas Maduro said a massive power outage that plunged most of the country into darkness Tuesday, causing traffic chaos in the bustling capital of Caracas, was due to sabotage.

Officials said 70 percent of the country was without electricity, shutting down traffic lights and partially disrupting the underground transport system.

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Parallels
10:40 am
Wed September 4, 2013

U.S. Competitiveness Up, Ranking Fifth, Survey Says

As the economy continues its recovery, the World Economic Forum's latest survey said U.S. global competitiveness is up after four years of decline.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 12:44 pm

U.S. competitiveness among global economies suffered after the 2008 global economic crisis. Four years after the crisis, the U.S. slipped in the World Economic Forum's annual competitiveness ranking. This year it's back up a bit: The U.S. rose to fifth position overall from seventh last year, in the forum's latest survey, which was released Wednesday.

Here's what the survey says about the U.S., the world's largest economy:

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The Salt
10:37 am
Wed September 4, 2013

A Greener Way To Cool Your Foods On The Way To The Grocery Store

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 3:13 pm

Your produce and frozen foods could soon arrive at grocery stores in trucks that release fewer emissions. Researchers are developing a clean technology to keep your food cool while it travels.

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Shots - Health News
10:33 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Chronic Illnesses Outpace Infections As Big Killers Worldwide

Percentage of deaths each year due to neonatal disorders around the globe.
Courtesy of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 2:41 pm

People around the world are getting healthier and living longer.

Infectious diseases are declining around the globe. But at the same time, chronic health problems are on the rise, particularly in developing nations.

These are some of the key findings in the latest reports released by the World Bank and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

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The Two-Way
10:13 am
Wed September 4, 2013

So McCain Plays Games On His Phone When He's Bored; Do You?

Those are the hands and phone of Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. He gets bored sometimes, the lawmaker says. So, during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing Tuesday, he played a little poker.
Melina Mara The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 10:32 am

We were shocked, shocked to see a photo taken by The Washington Post's Melina Mara of Sen.

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All Tech Considered
10:10 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Data Marketers Know What You Bought Last Summer

The online purchases you make help form a data profile that marketers use to sell you more stuff. A new site lets you see what data the marketers have on you.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 2:09 pm

If you've ever wondered just how much marketing companies know about you, whether it's your education or income or purchase preferences, today you can see for yourself.

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Beauty Shop
10:03 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Who Are The Smartest People On Twitter?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, Sheila Bridges stood out for many reasons in her chosen field of interior design. Her celebrity client list, being African-American, but then she began to stand out in a way she did not want - she started losing her hair. We'll talk about how that changed her life and her focus. She talks about that in her new memoir "The Bald Mermaid." And we'll have that conversation in just a few minutes.

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Politics
9:58 am
Wed September 4, 2013

What Does America Think Of President Obama's 'Red Line?'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're going to spend a good amount of time today hearing various points of view about how the U.S. and the international community should respond to events in Syria. Later, when we head into the Beauty Shop, we'll ask our panel of women journalists and commentators for their thoughts. And we also want to ask them about a list published by a business magazine of the smartest women on Twitter that was notably lacking in diversity. That's in just a few minutes.

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The Two-Way
9:58 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Texas, Mississippi National Guard Won't Process Same-Sex Claims

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, pictured last month in Orlando, Fla., has said the Texas National Guard must follow state law despite a Department of Defense policy directive on same-sex marriage benefits.
Phelan M. Ebenhack AP

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 3:39 pm

The Texas and Mississippi National Guards are refusing to process benefits claims for same-sex couples, despite a Department of Defense directive to the contrary.

Maj. Gen. John Nichols, commander of the Texas forces, made the announcement Tuesday, saying the state's Family Code conflicts with the Defense directive that was issued last month in response to a Supreme Court decision striking down a key provision of the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA.

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The Two-Way
9:34 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Sprinter Usain Bolt Says He'll Retire After 2016 Olympics

Usain Bolt of Jamaica sprints to victory and a new world record in the men's 4x100 meter relay at the 2011 IAAF World Athletics Championships in Daegu, South Korea.
Mark Dadswell Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 10:16 am

Usain Bolt, the Jamaican sprinter widely regarded as the fastest man alive, says he's thinking about hanging up his running shoes after the 2016 Olympics in Brazil.

The 27-year-old holds world records in the 100 and 200 meters and has six Olympic gold medals. But Bolt says that before retiring, he'd like to win gold in Rio de Janeiro as well as at next year's Commonwealth Games and best his own world record in the 200.

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Parallels
8:56 am
Wed September 4, 2013

In Damascus, Anxiety, School Shopping And Soldiers Everywhere

Syrian boys walk on the rubble of a building in Damascus that was hit by what activists said was shelling by government forces. The threat of a possible U.S. strike has added to the sense of unease in the Syrian capital.
Bassam Khabieh Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:29 am

The author is a Syrian citizen in Damascus who is not being further identified for safety reasons.

A threatened U.S. military strike against Syria, now on hold, has left much of Damascus in limbo, filled with unease and uncertainty.

Since President Obama said that the Syrian government must be punished for allegedly using chemical weapons against its civilians, the capital has turned into one huge military barracks.

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The Two-Way
8:09 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Ohio Is Publicly Shaming Another Convicted Idiot

Richard Dameron tells Cleveland's WKYC-TV he's sorry for drunkenly dialing 911. A judge says he has to stand outside a police station each day this week to show that to the city.
WKYC.com

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 10:10 am

Drive by the police station in Cleveland's second district this week and you'll likely see 58-year-old Richard Dameron standing outside with a sign that reads:

"I apologize to officer Simone & all police officers for being an idiot calling 911 threatening to kill you. I'm sorry and it will never happen again."

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The Two-Way
7:49 am
Wed September 4, 2013

'I Always Reserve The Right' To Act, Obama Says Of Syria

President Obama during his news conference Wednesday in Stockholm.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 10:08 am

Although he says he did not ask Congress to authorize the use of force against Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime "as a symbolic gesture," President Obama reiterated Wednesday that "I always reserve the right and responsibility to act on behalf of America's national security."

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The Two-Way
6:23 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Okla. Court Puts Hold On Return Of 'Baby Veronica' To S.C.

An October 2011 photo of "Baby Veronica," provided by her adoptive mother, Melanie Capobianco.
Melanie Capobianco AP

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 9:54 am

The complicated and emotional case of a Native American girl who was adopted by a couple in South Carolina but has been living for more than 18 months with her biological father in Oklahoma has taken another turn.

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The Two-Way
5:39 am
Wed September 4, 2013

In Europe, Obama Will Seek Support For Syria Strike

President Obama as he emerged from Air Force One early Wednesday in Stockholm.
Kevin Lamarque Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 9:49 am

President Obama landed in Sweden on Wednesday — the start of a European trip that will take him to Russia for a summit of world leaders at which he'll try to build support for his plan to strike targets inside Syria.

As The Washington Post says, it's a "high-stakes trip ... that could show whether the United States has broad international backing for action."

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The Two-Way
5:13 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Book News: Malala, Girl Shot By Taliban, Calls Books 'Weapons That Defeat Terrorism'

Malala Yousafzai, shown here in March 2012, was shot in the head by the Taliban for supporting education rights for girls.
T. Mughal EPA/Landov

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
5:06 am
Wed September 4, 2013

UMass Breaks Record For Largest Fruit Salad

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Politics
4:58 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Sen. McCain Caught Playing Poker During Syria Hearing

During the more than three hour hearing on Tuesday, Sen. John McCain started playing poker on his phone. A photographer for The Washington Post snapped the photo. McCain confessed on Twitter, and said, "Worst of all I lost."

The Two-Way
4:53 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Social Media Erupt On News Of Ariel Castro's Death

It took neighbors' help for Amanda Berry to escape through the bolted storm door of the Cleveland home where authorities say she and two other women were held captive for nearly a decade. After she emerged, the women and Berry's daughter were rescued. Later, the home was destroyed.
David Maxwell EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 9:46 am

As Americans wake up Wednesday to the news that Ariel Castro is dead, many are turning to Twitter and other social media to share their thoughts.

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Sports
4:43 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Pirates End Decades Of Losing Seasons

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:50 am

The Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Milwaukee Brewers Tuesday night for the team's 81st win of the season. That win guarantees the Pirates will not have a losing season this year — as it has since 1993.

Business
4:42 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Latino Buying Power Gets Movie Studios' Attention

Instructions Not Included, a film starring and directed by Eugenio Derbez, was made specifically for a Mexican and U.S. Latino audience.
Pantelion Films

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 9:12 am

One of the surprise movie hits this past weekend was almost entirely in Spanish. Instructions Not Included made an enormous amount of money per screen, more than $22,000, playing in fewer than 350 theaters. The boys in One Direction had the number one film, but they pulled in less than $6000 per screen. That's a huge victory for star Eugenio Derbez, a household name in Mexico, and for Pantelion films, which has been trying to find a Spanish-language hit in the U.S. film market for a few years now.

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Around the Nation
4:42 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Water Dispute Heightens Tensions Between U.S., Mexico

Mexico and the United States are supposed to share water according to a 70-year-old treaty that aims to protect each nation's needs. But prolonged drought is testing that relationship. Mexico is behind by 38 percent on its deliveries.

Around the Nation
2:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Las Vegas Gambles On Unique Business Incubator

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 9:12 am

The Downtown Container Park will set up budding entrepreneurs in repurposed shipping containers. The park will have 35 containers and a bunch of modular cubes like you'd normally see at a construction site — all to house local businesses.

NPR Story
2:40 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Congress Should Examine Fine Print When Voting On Syria

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And as Congress prepares to vote on authorizing force, Yale Law Professor Stephen L. Carter has some advice.

STEPHEN L. CARTER: The one thing I would strongly recommend is that members of Congress actually read the resolution before deciding whether to vote for it or not.

MONTAGNE: He says it's hard to approve of a president waging war while still limiting the power the president is given.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:40 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Obama Considers Training Options For Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama has promised limited military action against Syria. He says missile strikes are not about regime change and there will be no boots on the ground. But even as the Congress debates the president's plans for action, the White House is looking at broader options.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports the president may call on the U.S. military to help build up the Syrian opposition.

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NPR Story
2:40 am
Wed September 4, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:42 am

Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne have the Last Word in business.

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