education

Holly Pretsky / KRCC

Waiting in line at a soup kitchen or riding a bus may not be typical medical school curriculum, but that's exactly what some med students did last week.

Shanna Lewis / KRCC

While crews are out mopping up hot spots and reinforcing the Hayden Pass Fire perimeter in Fremont and Custer counties, there's a diverse group of young people working behind the scenes to keep the base camp running.

Holly Pretsky / KRCC

President Barack Obama spoke Thursday at the Air Force Academy commencement celebration. For many graduates, it was a day they will never forget.
 


The deadline for the first marijuana tax funded scholarship in Pueblo is fast approaching, but there haven't been many applicants yet.

Bente Birkeland / RMCR

The Governor's commission studying American Indian representations in public schools released its report this week. The group recommends that public schools do not use American Indian mascots, but if they do, they should partner with a tribe to make sure it is done in a respectful way. Right now thirty Colorado schools use some type of American Indian mascot or imagery.

The commission went to four schools to bring American Indian and non-American Indian people together, community members, school boards, and students. This follows failed attempts at the statehouse to ban these types of mascots.

Tuesday Newscast, 4/19/16, 7:04 AM

Apr 19, 2016

Newscast for Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 7:04 AM:
 


KRCC

A bill that would force school districts to allow medical marijuana on school grounds is making its way through the state legislature. As part of our Capitol Conversation series, Bente Birkeland speaks with other statehouse reporters about the issue.

Monday Newscast, 1/4/16, 5:32 PM

Jan 4, 2016

Newscast for Monday, January 4, 2016, 5:32 PM:
 

Monday Newscast, 12/14/15, 5:32 PM

Dec 14, 2015

Newscast for Monday, December 14, 2015, 5:32 PM:
 


Lt. Governor Joe Garcia to Step Down

Nov 10, 2015
Bente Birkeland / RMCR

Colorado's Lt. Governor Joe Garcia announced Tuesday that he is stepping down from the position next year, after five years on the job. He also heads the Colorado Department of Higher Education and will leave that post to helm a higher education policy group for the western U.S., called the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education.
 


Milken Family Foundation

A middle school teacher in Pueblo County is one of up to 40 nationwide to win a Milken Educator Award.

Former Staff Sergeant Ryan Moore has taught for seven years after spending six in the Army.  The 8th grade science teacher at Liberty Pointe International in Pueblo West was surprised by the award, which comes with an unrestricted $25,000. 

Moore says his teaching philosophy is based on relationships.

"Through relationship teaching, you learn about these kids, you learn about their home lives, you learn about their struggles, you learn about their successes," says Moore.  "And when you do that, teaching becomes easy because you know how to reach them.  And it also becomes easy because you want to help these kinds once you know them."

Moore says he genuinely loves his work and the people at his school. 

Milken Educator Awards come from the Milken Family Foundation, which cites Moore's classroom imagination and leadership as some of the reasons for the award.

Monday Newscast, 10/12/15, 5:32 PM

Oct 12, 2015

Newscast for Monday, October 12, 2015, 5:32 PM:
 

Friday Newscast, 10/9/15, 5:32 PM

Oct 9, 2015

Newscast for Friday, October 9, 2015, 5:32 PM:
 

Wednesday Newscast, 10/7/15, 5:32 PM

Oct 7, 2015

Newscast for Wednesday, October 7, 2015, 5:32 PM:
 

Tuesday Newscast, 9/22/15, 6:04 PM

Sep 22, 2015

Newscast for Tuesday, September 22, 2015, 6:04 PM:

Monday Newscast, 9/21/15, 6:04 PM

Sep 21, 2015

Newscast for Monday, September 21, 2015, 6:04 PM:

Tuesday Newscast, 9/15/15, 5:32 PM

Sep 15, 2015

Newscast for Tuesday, September 15, 2015, 5:32 PM:
 

Thursday Newscast, 9/10/15, 6:04 PM

Sep 10, 2015

Newscast for Thursday, September 10, 205, 6:04 PM:
 

clipart.com

Students are heading back to school, but the road to graduation for this year's incoming crop of seniors varies by high school. The reason? Unlike other states, Colorado does not have a set requirement for what it takes to receive a diploma.

Creating a standard is an ongoing debate and one that state lawmakers tried to answer in 2007 and 2008 when they approved legislation requiring a minimum statewide requirement.
 

Tuesday Newscast, 8/18/15, 5:32 PM

Aug 18, 2015

Newscast for Tuesday, 8/18/15, 5:32 PM:

  • Several school superintendents came to the state capitol on Monday to talk about the challenges of preparing young children for kindergarten.
     
  • Colorado lawmakers are starting to quantify the state's racial profiling by law enforcement in the aftermath of high-profile clashes between the public and officers around the nation.
     
clipart.com

A measure to eliminate immunity for public schools for shootings, deaths, sexual assaults and other series injuries that happen to students on school grounds was signed into law on Wednesday. Previously schools had absolute immunity.

The law would cap damages at $900,000 for multiple injuries per incident. Governor Hickenlooper says the state has experienced its fair share of tragedies in schools and hopes the law will make students safer.

clipart

A measure to eliminate immunity for public schools for school shootings, death, sexual assaults and other series injuries that happen to students on school grounds cleared the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday. It passed on a vote of 10-3.

Currently public schools are not liable. Legislative leaders in both parties are sponsoring the change, spurred in part by the death of Claire Davis in 2013. Davis attended Arapahoe High School in Littleton when a fellow student shot and killed her before turning the gun on himself.

Two former governors, Roy Romer and Bill Owens, joined current Gov. John Hickenlooper at the state capitol to urge lawmakers not to go too far in reducing the numbers of standardized assessments school children take. This comes as legislators are debating several bills to lower the number of exams.

Republican Bill Owens said it's important to have standards and test against those standards to see if students are learning what they should, and to evaluate schools and teachers.

"Our friends from the left and the right for differing reasons, don't want to test, don't want to measure, don't want to have accountability," said Owens. "This is stunning to me."

file

UPDATE 04/15/15 - The House passed the bill; it's expected to fail in the Senate.

ORIGINAL POST 04/14/15: Democrats in the House unexpectedly delayed a vote on an American Indian mascot bill after they realized Republicans had enough votes to kill it.  

clipart

A bi-partisan measure aimed at reducing the number of tests Colorado public school students take is in limbo at the state legislature. The sponsors delayed the first hearing and don’t know when it will be rescheduled – if at all.

On average, students in Colorado classrooms take more than two-dozen assessments before they graduate, and in some cases up to four times a year according to the Colorado Education Association.  Critics say it actually means less time for overall learning.

D. Utterback

Governor John Hickenlooper recently sat down with reporters to discuss how the legislative session is going so far. Lawmakers are just past the midpoint of the four-month long session.

Which bills are being delayed?

How is the Governor handling split legislative control?

Here are a couple highlights from the conversation:

Kristen Wyatt, Associated Press

Martha Perez-Sanz / KRCC (file photo)

Students in La Junta plan to visit Bent’s Old Fort Wednesday in order to virtually recreate its environment. KRCC’s Dana Cronin reports.
 

Students from Otero Junior College and La Junta High School are expected to take measurements of the site in order to recreate it on the popular computer game Minecraft.

Bente Birkeland / RMCR

It has been more than a year since recreational marijuana stores opened in Colorado and retail sales began. Schools are grappling with the best way to discusses marijuana in the classroom amidst changing attitudes. 

While schools aren’t required to separate out marijuana incidents from other illicit drugs such as cocaine, anecdotal evidence compiled by Rocky Mountain PBS I-News suggests more students are using marijuana.

Clipart.com

Even after a full year of being able to purchase recreational marijuana – questions still remain for the state of Colorado. Is its use dangerous, should there be tighter labeling on pot edibles – and is its easy access impacting middle and high school students? Recent data compiled by the Department of Education and Rocky Mountain PBS I-News show incidents of student drug use last year hitting a ten-year high, but state officials don’t have a clear picture if the two are related.

While much of the attention the 2014 election season has been focused on Colorado's Senate and gubernatorial races, voters will also be deciding the fates of four statewide ballot questions. One of those questions seeks to expand gambling at racetracks to help fund K-12 education.

If approved, Amendment 68 would allow horse race tracks in Arapahoe, Mesa and Pueblo counties to offer slot machines, roulette, craps, and card games such as blackjack and poker. Arapahoe Park in Aurora is at the center of the campaign.

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