history

Martha Perez-Sanz / KRCC (file photo)

Students in La Junta plan to visit Bent’s Old Fort Wednesday in order to virtually recreate its environment. KRCC’s Dana Cronin reports.
 

Students from Otero Junior College and La Junta High School are expected to take measurements of the site in order to recreate it on the popular computer game Minecraft.

Bente Birkeland / RMCR

Governor John Hickenlooper has apologized on behalf of the state of Colorado for the Sand Creek Massacre. The Massacre happened in the early morning of November 29th, 1864.  U.S. Calvary soldiers converged on a sleeping group of mostly women, children and elderly Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians. The 150 year-old event is one of the most notable incidents of violence against Native Americans in the history of the west.
 

Shanna Lewis / KRCC

The start of a massive repair project on the Arkansas River levee in Pueblo is being delayed until December due to historic preservation concerns and some delays in the funding.
 

The project’s consulting engineer Kim Kock says the state historic preservation officer has said the levee could be deemed historic because it was constructed in response to the deadly 1921 floods and used methods of that time period.

Public Domain

Crew members from the USS Pueblo are holding a reunion in Southern Colorado after the ship was captured by North Korea nearly half a century ago.  KRCC’s Rachel Gonchar has more.
 

Originally an Army freight vessel, the USS Pueblo was transferred to the United States Navy and became an American spy ship. It was renamed after Pueblo County in the 1960’s. In January 1968, North Korean patrol boats captured the ship while it was cruising alone off the North Korean coast.

Courtesy: Bessamer Historical Society

Part of a small neighborhood near the former Colorado Fuel and Iron steel mill in southeast Pueblo could become a national historic district. As a post-World War II working class neighborhood, it’s not the kind of place you’d normally expect to get this kind of recognition. It’s long been known as Old Bojon Town after the Eastern European immigrants who came to work at the mill.

Jodene Parlapiano

This Sunday marks the 100th anniversary of one of the most deadly days in labor history -- the Ludlow Massacre. Southern Colorado coal miners went on strike for safer working conditions in September of 1913.  It ultimately led to violent conflict between the miners and the companies they worked for. On that day in April a century ago,  21 people died - including women and children.
 

Martha Perez-Sanz / KRCC

La Junta, Colorado is about the 30th stop en route to Los Angeles from Chicago on Amtrak’s Southwest Chief. As the Southwest Chief’s rails are aging and expensive repairs are needed, La Junta is at risk of being removed from the train’s historic route.
 

Downtown La Junta is sprinkled with cafes and small artisan shops. There’s the Otero Museum, which documents the history of the region, and the Koshare Indian Museum, which hosts native dance programs. Bent’s Old Fort is just eight miles from downtown.

Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [LC-USF343-001617-ZE] / Library of Congress

John Steinbeck’s classic the Grapes of Wrath turns 75 on Monday.  The novel takes place during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, and follows the Joad family as they leave Oklahoma and head to California.  Portions of Colorado were also a part of the Dust Bowl, and certainly the state is no stranger to blowing dust.

Colorado Poet Laureate David Mason penned Ludlow, a “novel-in-verse” based on the Ludlow Massacre.  The event took place 100 years ago this month and left its mark on Colorado and on labor relations across the country. 

Mason, also a Colorado College English Professor, came by the KRCC studios for a conversation that aired live on sister station KGNU in Boulder, and they’ve shared the audio with us.  KGNU’s Maeve Conran speaks with Colorado Poet Laureate and Ludlow author David Mason (30 minutes):

Brenda Biondo Brings America's Playgrounds to the People

Mar 12, 2014

We're excited to see that ForeEdge books will publish Manitou Springs-based photographer Brenda Biondo's book, Once Upon a Playground, this May (visit this Blurb book for a preview of her beautiful photography).

Colorado Springs has its own fascinating history with playgrounds--check out this video we produced back in 2010 on Colorado Springs native and artist, Fred Schumm, and his space age creations.

The State Historical Fund, or SHF, has awarded nearly $9 million total in grants for preservation projects all over the state.  KRCC’s Eliza Densmore reports.
 

The Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum, the Fine Arts Center, and the Canon City Carnegie Library are among the southern Colorado structures that recently received funds.

Steve Turner, Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer, says often the buildings chosen for the grants are among the most loved places in a community.  "They also are frequently really the civic heart of a community," Turner said.

Hampton Sides is the author of many acclaimed books including Ghost Soldiers,  Blood and Thunder, and the forthcoming book In the Kingdom of Ice. Sides will read at Colorado College tonight, October 3, 2012 at 7 p.m. in the Gates Common Room in Palmer Hall on the Colorado College Campus as part of the Visiting Writers Series. Professor Steven Hayward of KRCC’s Off Topic spoke with him about his writing.

Palmer High School Student, Graham Gale, came to us with an idea to combine two of her interests - local history & public media - for a school project. Graham visited the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum and found the scrapbook of a young woman who lived in the rather different Colorado Springs of 100 years ago.