Supreme Court To Decide If Mexican Nationals May Sue For Border Shooting

The cellphone video is vivid. A Border Patrol agent aims his gun at an unarmed 15-year-old some 60 feet away, across the border with Mexico, and shoots him dead. On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case testing whether the family of the dead boy can sue the agent for damages in the U.S. Between 2005 and 2013, there were 42 such cross-border shootings, a dramatic increase over earlier times. The shooting took place on the border between El Paso, Texas, and Juárez, Mexico....

Read More
91.5 KRCC

Colorado is roughly a third of the way through the four-month long legislative session. John Frank, a reporter for The Denver Post, and Peter Marcus with ColoradoPolitics.com sat down with statehouse reporter Bente Birkeland to take stock of the big issues this session.

Courtesy Jodene Parlapiano

After a 90-year absence, a Rockefeller has returned to Pueblo. Once considered the wealthiest family in the world, the Rockefellers are often blamed for the 1914 Ludlow Massacre - a notorious event in labor history when striking coal miners and their families were killed in southern Colorado.

Looking Up: Width & Wisdom

22 hours ago
NASA, ESA, and L. Lamy (Observatory of Paris, CNRS, CNES) / nasa.gov

This week on Looking Up Hal takes us planet hopping. The final destination will be the planet Uranus.

Some things in the southern Colorado sky are very easy to spot – the moon, super-bright Venus and pretty bright Mars. But other things are much harder to spot, especially when city lights make viewing harder. So today I want to tell you about a little trick you can use this week to find one of the more difficult to spot items, the planet Uranus, using the much brighter and easier to spot planet Mars, in the early evening sky. 

On the day before President Trump's inauguration, the outgoing Obama administration passed a last-minute directive, banning the use of lead ammunition and fishing sinkers on federal land.

Recently, the deteriorating health of a bald eagle showed the effects of lead poisoning. Obama's regulation is intended to protect wildlife from exactly that.

But hunters are hoping Trump will soon overturn it.

Last week, an officer from the Pennsylvania Game Commission brought a bald eagle to the Carbon County Environmental Education Center in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

At 98, Riichi Fuwa doesn't remember his Social Security number, but he remembers this: "19949. That was my number the government gave me," he said. "19949. You were more number than name."

That was the number that Fuwa was assigned when he was 24 years old, soon after he was forced off his family's farm in Bellingham, Wash., and incarcerated at the Tule Lake camp, just south of the Oregon border in California's Modoc County.

COLORADO SENATE REPUBLICANS

A Colorado newspaper is fighting claims that it peddles fake news stories. The publisher of Grand Junction's Daily Sentinel is accusing a state lawmaker of defamation and threatening a lawsuit. If filed, legal experts said it would be the first of its kind, potentially setting a legal definition for what is considered fake news and what is not.

Cameron Witting / Monterey International

Six time Grammy Award Winners The Blind Boys of Alabama will be headlining this year's Blues Under the Bridge Festival on Saturday July 29th!  Also, playing this years festival are rockabilly/blues group the Paladins, harp player Bob Corritore and guitarist Big Jon Atkinson, Erica Brown with the Movers and Shakers out of Denver, and local favorites the Sugar Sounds.  

Tickets will be going on sale soon, and 91.5 KRCC will be announcing pre-festival parties and concerts leading up the full day festival in the next couple of weeks.

Chef Terence Rogers of TBD Foods in Denver is bringing back casual, in-home dinner parties with an intimate setting located right inside his own quaint Cheesman Park apartment.  We got to attend the winter smoke-out dinner on Friday, February 3, enjoying a self-serve, barbecue-inspired dinner at a table of six.

The Environmental Protection Agency has a pretty simple mission in principle: to protect human health and the environment. It's a popular purpose too. Nearly three out of four U.S. adults believe the country "should do whatever it takes to protect the environment," according to a 2016 survey by the Pew Research Center.

Political support for the EPA, though, is less effusive.

This weekend marks 75 years since President Roosevelt's executive order that sent Japanese-Americans to internment camps.

Roy Ebihara and his wife, 82-year-old Aiko, were children then, and both were held in camps with their families.

At StoryCorps, 83-year-old Roy told Aiko about what happened in his hometown of Clovis, N.M., in the weeks just before the executive order was issued.

Pages

Station News

Peak Curiosity from 91.5 KRCC

_

You can help 91.5 krcc

Be informed & connected

Get 91.5 KRCC's Weekly Newsletter

Stay on top of NPR and local news, culture, events and music.