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Looking Up: 8 Days A Week Was Not Enough...

Jul 16, 2018
By Firkin / Creative Commons Open Clipart

This week on Looking Up Bruce Bookout takes time to explain calender reformation. 

We again mark a calendar to help us break up our revolution around the sun into smaller more manageable portions. Calendars are funny things in that keeping them and naming their parts lends to strange things. 

Looking Up: A Spot That's Hard To Spot

Jul 9, 2018
NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington / nasa.gov

It's a good week to try and find the closest planet to our sun.

Often times, the brightest objects in the sky are our fellow planets. Jupiter, Saturn, and especially Venus blaze in the night sky. But the most elusive of all the planets to see might well be one that isn't farthest from the Sun, but rather is closest, the remarkable planet Mercury.

Looking Up: At The Shadow The Time Will Be...

Jun 25, 2018
by oksmith; A public domain image uploaded to https://commons.wikimedia.org by user AzaToth / Creative Commons Open Clipart

This week on Looking Up Bruce Bookout sheds some light and some shadow on the origins of the sundial.

As we have discussed before, timekeeping is an essential part of Astronomy.  The ancients relied on very low tech for many methods to tell time.  One effective method divides the day into relevant parts. Let’s shine a little light on the Sundial.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

President Trump Monday announced his intention to create a "space force" that would oversee the military's activities off-world.

"When it comes to defending America, it is not enough to merely have an American presence in space," Trump said at a meeting of the National Space Council, which oversees the nation's space policy. "We must have American dominance in space. So important."

Looking Up: Miss Beehiven

Jun 18, 2018
Copyright: Jimmy Westlake (Colorado Mountain College) / nasa.gov

This week on Looking Up Venus entertains the Beehive Cluster in a celestial gathering of lovely and luminous objects.

Have you been wondering what that really bright star-like thing is in the western sky after sundown? Well, it’s the planet Venus, the third brightest thing in our sky, after the Sun and the Moon.

NASA/Penn State University / wikipedia / public domain

This week on Looking Up we are introduced to Barnard's Star.

There is a lovely constellation in the Southern Colorado sky right now, with the awkward name of Ophiuchus. And in Ophiuchus is a remarkable star with the unusually possessive name of Barnard’s Star.

courtesy U.S. Air Force

Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson is a 1982 graduate of the Air Force Academy. Now she's responsible for the more than 670,000 active-duty Air Force personnel and their families. She also oversees the military branch's more than $132 billion budget. Wilson was in town recently for the Air Force Academy graduation and the change in command at NORAD and NORTHCOM. While here, she sat down with 91.5 KRCC's Andrea Chalfin to talk about space.

Looking Up: Will Work For Helium

Jun 4, 2018
Till Credner, AlltheSky.com / wikipedia

This week on Looking Up we comb through Leo the Lion's mane and discover a star by the name of Algenubi. 

We’ve talked before about constellations that really don’t look like what they’re named after, and some that do. The constellation Leo falls into that second group, as the bright star Regulus anchors the neck, so to speak, of the lion, with five stars above making what looks like a backwards question mark, or more correctly, the head and mane of the lion. And the very last star in that mane, out at the end, is the very cool star with a very long name, Al Ras Al Asad Al Janubiyyah, known today simply as Algenubi.

Looking Up: The Ethos Of...

May 28, 2018
Andrew Dunn / Wikimedia Commons

This week on Looking Up Bruce Bookout enlightens us as to what the study of archaeoastronomy actually is. 

One of the newer disciplines in science is the field of Archaeoastronomy.  We have been speaking to this subject during my tenure on “Looking Up”, but have never actually defined it. Archaeoastronomy is the study of astronomical practices, celestial lore, mythologies, religions and world-views of ancient cultures.  In many ways it is an “Anthropology of Astronomy”.

Looking Up: Big Little Ceres

May 21, 2018
Gregory H. Revera, NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA / wikimedia commons

This week on Looking Up we check in on one of our solar system neighbors... Ceres.

Can we talk Ceres for a minute? Or, more precisely, 90 seconds? You see, Ceres, the largest asteroid in the Solar System, is particularly well positioned to observe this week, and you should take a look – Ceres-ously!

Looking Up: In The Court Of The Planet King

May 14, 2018
NASA, ESA, and J. Nichols (University of Leicester) / nasa.gov

This week on Looking Up we learn about the second biggest object in our solar system - Jupiter.

May is a great month in the southern Colorado sky if you like things that are really big. What's the biggest thing in our neck of the woods? I'll give you a hint, it's the Sun, which contains 99.98% of all the mass of the entire Solar System - planets, asteroids, comets, dust, the works.

Looking Up: Zub A Dub Dub, 3 Stars In A...

May 7, 2018
Francois du Toit / nasa.gov

This week on Looking Up we learn about an interesting star system, and also how to pronounce Zubenelgenubi.

There is a very interesting star to see in the southern Colorado sky right now, and it’s pretty easy to find this month. Why? Because it has a giant ball of gas nearby as a marker. That’s right, the massive planet Jupiter, the brightest thing in our sky after the Moon and Venus is just below the difficult to pronounce star that is in the constellation of Libra.

Wikimedia Commons

On Looking Up this week, Bruce Bookout speaks about the mythical Thunderbird and the thunderous Navajo legend behind it. 

The mythology of the thunderbird is wide and various across America and Canada. Navajo legend holds that the Thunderbird carries all the clouds in its tail and rain under its wings. Thus when the Thunderbird constellation is shining brightly in the spring sky, the rainy season has arrived.

Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET

SpaceX has launched NASA's planet-hunting satellite TESS into outer space Wednesday evening from Cape Canaveral.

Tess — short for Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite — will spend two years searching for planets near bright, nearby stars. The satellite was launched on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

The launch window was narrow — just 30 seconds — and TESS was to be deployed into orbit about 48 minutes after launch.

The government could be heading into another shutdown Thursday, but some of the places deemed too essential to close are seldom heard of, like this windowless office in Boulder. 

It’s a weather prediction center, but not the usual kind. Instead of talking about snow or rain, these forecasters talk about plumes of molten plasma. The winds they watch travel at a million miles an hour. This office specializes in space weather.

Rocket Project to Launch in Pueblo

Jul 27, 2015

A testing and manufacturing center for rocket propulsion is launching in Pueblo.
 

The project from Centennial-based United Launch Alliance is for a next generation rocket called the Vulcan. The company is looking to commercialize space access and help make it more cost-efficient.

The facility will create 34 new jobs in Pueblo that are expected to generate around $19 million yearly in revenue for the local economy. 

Pueblo Economic Development Corporation President Jack Rink says the impact could be even bigger.