Women's Issues

A program to provide long acting reversible contraceptives to low-income women has been funded for another year. About a dozen health and community foundations have stepped up to provide the funds, something the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment had been working overtime to try and secure.

Tuesday Newscast, 8/25/15, 5:32 PM

Aug 25, 2015

Newscast for Tuesday, August 25, 2015, 5:32 PM:

Despite state lawmakers failing to pass a bill to fund the effort, a program to provide long acting reversible birth control to young, low-income women in Colorado is being extended for another year.

The long acting contraceptives, according to state figures, have helped cut teen pregnancy rates in the state by 40 percent. Abortions have gone down too.

D. Utterback

Democrats at the state capitol scuttled an abortion rights bill just before the senate was about to debate it on the floor. It was broadly written and would have banned Colorado from "enacting any policy that denies or interferes with and individual’s reproductive healthcare decisions.” As part of our Capitol Conversation series, Bente Birkeland analyzes the political motivations behind the measure and why Democrats reversed course so quickly.